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I'm in need of a quality electric heater for a customers lobby/waiting room and I'm hoping someone can point me in the direction of one that will not be too noisy or of poor quality.

The area is about 12'x12' and does not have a double door so every time a customer walks in the cold air comes with them. They originally wanted baseboard but I don't think they can keep up with the drafts, also the waiting room chairs will be in front of the baseboard heater and may get some melted scarves or coats that might come in contact with them while waiting.

Currently I'm looking at in wall 208/240 volt heaters with a built in fan and thermostat. (the ones that can be installed in a stud bay) I'm thinking the forced air will help with the rush of cold air every time the door opens.

Anyone with some experience with the good and the bad of these so I don't instal something I will regret later.

Thanks, John.
 

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I'm in need of a quality electric heater for a customers lobby/waiting room and I'm hoping someone can point me in the direction of one that will not be too noisy or of poor quality.

The area is about 12'x12' and does not have a double door so every time a customer walks in the cold air comes with them. They originally wanted baseboard but I don't think they can keep up with the drafts, also the waiting room chairs will be in front of the baseboard heater and may get some melted scarves or coats that might come in contact with them while waiting.

Currently I'm looking at in wall 208/240 volt heaters with a built in fan and thermostat. (the ones that can be installed in a stud bay) I'm thinking the forced air will help with the rush of cold air every time the door opens.

Anyone with some experience with the good and the bad of these so I don't instal something I will regret later.

Thanks, John.
Try this John....
 

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The forced air may actually make the inrush of cold air worse. Air moving in the room will cause lower pressure, and may cause more air to be sucked in.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
For those with experience with both, how does the Cadet brand compare to Qmark in quality.

Thank you for all of the suggestions.

John.
 

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Thank you, I'm probably going to just grab the 2000 watt cadet that Black Dog recommended, worst case I'll just replace it with one larger.
 

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The forced air may actually make the inrush of cold air worse. Air moving in the room will cause lower pressure, and may cause more air to be sucked in.
Well, yes...and no.

With a ducted forced air system you are spot-on. It will create a pressure differential that can make the draft situation worse....IF the return air register is in that vestibule. If there is only a feed register pushing warm air INTO the room, you are incorrect..the pressurized warm air coming in will push the cold air out. :thumbsup:

The units suggested in the thread do not intake or draw air from another room...they recirculate the same air in the same room, just like a standard space heater would..the difference being these are built into the wall.

It will (especially at 2000w) heat up the vestibule nicely, but since it does not in any way pressurize the room it will do nothing to either draw in a draft or force the cold air out if the space.

I have two of the Cadet in-walls in my under-renovation master suite, both at 1600w each..the room is 25x22 and they get it up to temp pretty fast..and unlike my baseboards in the living room (two 1500w units) which are on almost constantly, the Cadets only come on a few minute every other hour to keep the space warm.

Some tips to the OP for installing those units:

1: When mounting them to the studs, the side that will end up directly on the stud should be shimmed slightly to leave a small air gap so the hot metal is not in direct contact with the stud. (The housings do get pretty warm/hot in use.)

2: I routed my NM cable in from the next bay over, coming up from the bottom of the heater to stay away from it as much as possible. I do not recommend running your cable down in the same bay as the heater..the bay space can get heated up a bit. Hot enough to damage the NM? Probably not, but better to err on the side of caution.

3: I also installed a fire block about 4" above the heaters (well in one of them..the other ended up about an inch or two away), again just to be cautious. I also cut the wall insulation back away from the bottom of the heater about 2-3 inches.

I may have pics of the rough in on those which I'll post up in my thread about the house renovations... ("My Own Private Idaho" in the residential forum)
 

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Quellet

I have a Quellet in wall heater that has been in use for 8 years with no problems. Only problem is thermostat only goes to 90 deg and wife says that is not enough. :eek:
 
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Also take a look at these that you can mount at the top of the wall. They will keep the room toasty and are silent. [url said:
http://www.radiantsystemsinc.com/[/url]
That look pretty good! Have you installed any? If so, how did the customers like them?
 

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Electric heat is far too expensive to be a viable option here in .22/kw land, but I've had success with the Marley/Farenheat brand they sell at HD and a few of the local suppliers.
 

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That look pretty good! Have you installed any? If so, how did the customers like them?
i've installed maybe 6 or so units of different lengths. They recommend something like 10 watts/sq ft.

No complaints from customers.

The one thing i do not like is coming up with a clean way to wire them as they sit about an 1 1/2 off the wall. One inspector said "hey, no exposed romex" :laughing: so i had to come up with some BS sleeve or something rediculous.
 

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The units suggested in the thread do not intake or draw air from another room...they recirculate the same air in the same room, just like a standard space heater would..the difference being these are built into the wall.

It will (especially at 2000w) heat up the vestibule nicely, but since it does not in any way pressurize the room it will do nothing to either draw in a draft or force the cold air out if the space.
I understand what units are being suggested. I shouldn't have used the term forced air. Recirculated air that is moving will cause a lower pressure and may suck in cold air.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernoulli's_principle
 

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I have installed quite a number of the Cadet heaters in various different wattages and voltages...people love them and can actually lower their bills because they can heat the areas they are in, rather then heating the whole hole house every time the main thermostat activates. As with all heat insulation, weather stripping and good windows is the key.
 
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