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I am typically all residential, but this shouldn't be a problem. The business owner said the salesperson told him it would require a 60 amp breaker. I'm wiring an Ingersoll Rand TS4N5 air Compressor. The plate says 230V and 21.5 FLA. Why would I need a 60 amp breaker?

It's going to be placed within 25' of the breaker box, so I was going to put a double pole 30 and use #10. Even if I did 1 1/2% it would be a 40 amp breaker. How should I wire this thing? Thanks so much! -John
 

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I have that compressor in my shop. I ran 10's on a 40. It kept tripping out once it had pressure in it. I ended up running 6 on a 60 amp breaker and never looked back. P.S. It is a great compressor.
 

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Electrical contractor 37 years. Electrical inspector 2 years
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If the tag says minimum circuit ampacity ____. Maximum CB or fuse size, then you use that. If not then I you have to use NEC 430.248 and add 25% regardless of what the tag says. Is the building 208 volts or 240 volts.

FYI : A NEMA motor rated hp is a measure of work while an IEC motor hp is a measure of how much energy it uses. That is why a NEMA 5 hp motor is bigger and draws more amperes than a IEC motor.
 

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Depends if it has an unloader or not. If it don't, it'll start under full head pressure, and the 60a. would be my choice.
 

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I am typically all residential, but this shouldn't be a problem. The business owner said the salesperson told him it would require a 60 amp breaker. I'm wiring an Ingersoll Rand TS4N5 air Compressor. The plate says 230V and 21.5 FLA. Why would I need a 60 amp breaker?

It's going to be placed within 25' of the breaker box, so I was going to put a double pole 30 and use #10. Even if I did 1 1/2% it would be a 40 amp breaker. How should I wire this thing? Thanks so much! -John
Air compressors notoriously start under a very heavy load. This is normal, and also why they don't repeatedly cycle. You can use a smaller breaker and swap it out if you get nuisance trips, but it sounds like your sales rep has seen this before and knows these units take a good 300% to start.
 
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