Electrician Talk banner

1 - 20 of 42 Posts

·
Registered
Licensed Electrical Contractor (20 years)
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know a gas water heater is suppose to be 18 inches off the floor due to gas.
I've never heard of outlets needing to be 18 inches above the floor. Have any of you heard of this?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
405 Posts
I've never heard that, but it makes sense. Do you know which code? Electrical? Building? Fire?
I believe it to be in the NEC somewhere. I'm too lazy at the moment to look it up. Perhaps I am wrong, but every receptacle I see in a garage is at approximately 48 inches and I always install them at that height.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,263 Posts
I believe it to be in the NEC somewhere. I'm too lazy at the moment to look it up. Perhaps I am wrong, but every receptacle I see in a garage is at approximately 48 inches and I always install them at that height.
If anyone can quote a reference, that would be great.

We put them at 48” in new construction, but in remodel work I can easily see them getting put wherever is easiest/convenient.
 

·
Registered
Licensed Electrical Contractor (20 years)
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The inspector is saying 18 inches.
This is residential. I've not heard of that. I don't think it's in the NEC.
 

·
Registered
Electrician
Joined
·
1,565 Posts
As far as the NEC goes I don't think it is addressed anywhere. I think the mechanical code requires sources of ignition to be above 18". Sources of ignition would be a pilot light, ignitor, or appliance. Some consider the receptacle as a source of ignition but I'm not sure how the code is actually worded.
 

·
Registered
Power distribution and controls
Joined
·
432 Posts
I have always put repesticals @ 24-30" aff in garages. My new home I put ALL of the interior repesticals in horizontally at 24" I am old and do not like bending over that far.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
275 Posts
I know a gas water heater is suppose to be 18 inches off the floor due to gas.
I've never heard of outlets needing to be 18 inches above the floor. Have any of you heard of this?
Is this a dwelling unit?
There is no height requirement for receptacles in dwelling unit garages.
If your in a commercial auto repair shop then that is a different story.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Administrator
Retired EC
Joined
·
22,931 Posts
Absolutely no height restrictions unless it is commercial repair garage as stated above
 

·
Registered
Electrical contractor 37 years. Electrical inspector 2 years
Joined
·
1,364 Posts
I've always placed them at switch height.
I think the 48 inches came about for convenience. It is not required for residential. People store things against the walls blocking outlets. At 48 inches there is less of a chance of being blocked.
 

·
Old Grumpy Bastard
GOV/MIL contracting
Joined
·
61,598 Posts
I know it's in the code they shall not be more than 66" above the floor but I've always taken them as an ignition source and put them at 48".
 

·
Moderator
Estwing magic
Joined
·
25,671 Posts
Up here in the frozen north I have never seen a gas water heater lifted off the floor unless it was above a T-bar ceiling. There is no minimum receptacle height around gas appliances either as far as I know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,664 Posts
Even if it's not a requirement for residential garages it should be. I think it's a valid concern. Consider something like a faulty plug in power supply that catches fire at 12" off the floor and gasses that might collect low on the floor.
As for water heaters that's the plumbers concern. I always hated having to hoist water heaters up on a platform when replacing them.
In the US it's 18 inches off of the ground, as per the NFPA and the National Fuel Gas Code.
 

·
Moderator
Estwing magic
Joined
·
25,671 Posts
Even if it's not a requirement for residential garages it should be. I think it's a valid concern. Consider something like a faulty plug in power supply that catches fire at 12" off the floor and gasses that might collect low on the floor.
As for water heaters that's the plumbers concern. I always hated having to hoist water heaters up on a platform when replacing them.
In the US it's 18 inches off of the ground, as per the NFPA and the National Fuel Gas Code.
Even if it's not a requirement for residential garages it should be. I think it's a valid concern. Consider something like a faulty plug in power supply that catches fire at 12" off the floor and gasses that might collect low on the floor.
As for water heaters that's the plumbers concern. I always hated having to hoist water heaters up on a platform when replacing them.
In the US it's 18 inches off of the ground, as per the NFPA and the National Fuel Gas Code.
Youre supposed to fill it with water AFTER you get it up there. 🤣
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
493 Posts
Commercial repair garages
20-100 Scope (see Appendix B)
Rules 20-102 to 20-112 apply to commercial garages where vehicles powered by gasoline, propane, or other
flammable fuels are serviced or repaired.
20-102 Hazardous areas
(1) For each floor at or above grade, the entire area up to a level 50 mm above the floor shall be considered a
Class I, Zone 2 location except that adjacent areas shall not be classified as hazardous locations, provided
that they are
(a) elevated from a service and repair area by at least 50 mm; or
(b) separated from a service and repair area by tight-fitting barriers such as curbs, ramps, or partitions at
least 50 mm high.
(2) For each floor below grade, the entire area up to a level 50 mm above the bottom of outside doors or other
openings that are at, or above, grade level shall be considered a Class I, Zone 2 location except that, where
adequate ventilation is provided, the hazardous location shall extend up to a level of only 50 mm above
each such floor.
(3) Any pit or depression below floor level shall be considered a Class I, Zone 2 location that extends up to
50 mm above the floor level.


That's all we've got in the CEC

Sent from my SM-G975W using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,263 Posts
Even if it's not a requirement for residential garages it should be. I think it's a valid concern. Consider something like a faulty plug in power supply that catches fire at 12" off the floor and gasses that might collect low on the floor.
As for water heaters that's the plumbers concern. I always hated having to hoist water heaters up on a platform when replacing them.
In the US it's 18 inches off of the ground, as per the NFPA and the National Fuel Gas Code.
One thing that has irritated me is codes for the trades not being universal across the board. Like if something is a mechanical code, it should also be a electrical code, plumbing code and building code IF it applies to them. If an ignition source under 18” is considered a fail in the mechanical codes, and if a receptacle is considered an ignition source, then why hasn’t some genius put it in our code book??

How about the “No water lines over electrical equipment” code? Is that in the plumbers code book too?
 
1 - 20 of 42 Posts
Top