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So a home owner got a list of things to fix. One of them is a switch is too close to a shower. So I have two quick options. One is get a GFI switch (they exist but hard to get), and the other is put a GFI breaker on whatever CCT feeds that switch. My only concern is what there maybe a whole bunch of other things on that CCT, I haven't investigated yet. Can anyone think of any reason why an inspector wouldn't like a GFI breaker protecting more then just the washroom?
 

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I'd scope it out first just to verify anything has to be done at all
 

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If there is a smoke alarm on the circuit, that would violate 32-110.
32-110 Installation of smoke alarms and carbon monoxide alarms in dwelling units

The following requirements apply to the installation of permanently connected smoke alarms and carbon
monoxide alarms indwelling units:
(a) smoke alarms and carbon monoxide alarms shall be supplied from a lighting circuit, or from a circuit that
supplies a mix of lighting and receptacles, and in any case shall not be installed
(i) where prohibited by Rules 26-720 to 26-724; and
(ii) where the circuit is protected by a GFCI or AFCI;

Other than that, I see no other rules, unless the circuit is afci protected, then you would have to install a dead front. Has anyone heard of issues with afci and gfci on the same circuit?
 

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If there is a smoke alarm on the circuit, that would violate 32-110.
32-110 Installation of smoke alarms and carbon monoxide alarms in dwelling units

The following requirements apply to the installation of permanently connected smoke alarms and carbon
monoxide alarms indwelling units:
(a) smoke alarms and carbon monoxide alarms shall be supplied from a lighting circuit, or from a circuit that
supplies a mix of lighting and receptacles, and in any case shall not be installed
(i) where prohibited by Rules 26-720 to 26-724; and
(ii) where the circuit is protected by a GFCI or AFCI;

Other than that, I see no other rules, unless the circuit is afci protected, then you would have to install a dead front. Has anyone heard of issues with afci and gfci on the same circuit?

I hadn't thought of that. Does the NEC have something similar?
 

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If there is a smoke alarm on the circuit, that would violate 32-110.
32-110 Installation of smoke alarms and carbon monoxide alarms in dwelling units

The following requirements apply to the installation of permanently connected smoke alarms and carbon
monoxide alarms indwelling units:
(a) smoke alarms and carbon monoxide alarms shall be supplied from a lighting circuit, or from a circuit that
supplies a mix of lighting and receptacles, and in any case shall not be installed
(i) where prohibited by Rules 26-720 to 26-724; and
(ii) where the circuit is protected by a GFCI or AFCI;

Other than that, I see no other rules, unless the circuit is afci protected, then you would have to install a dead front. Has anyone heard of issues with afci and gfci on the same circuit?
none....install gfci receptacles on afci circuits all the time

been doing it for years
 

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none....install gfci receptacles on afci circuits all the time

been doing it for years
Ive had to do it a few times when I wire sunrooms. There seems to be a real misconception with some inspectors wether or not its a room or a screened in porch.

I always thought the defining line was wether it was heated (living space) or not (enclosed porch). Its not that cut and dry in some areas though.
 

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Ive had to do it a few times when I wire sunrooms. There seems to be a real misconception with some inspectors wether or not its a room or a screened in porch.

I always thought the defining line was wether it was heated (living space) or not (enclosed porch). Its not that cut and dry in some areas though.
around here most make you afci if it has windows, heated or not
 

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Ive had to do it a few times when I wire sunrooms. There seems to be a real misconception with some inspectors wether or not its a room or a screened in porch.

I always thought the defining line was wether it was heated (living space) or not (enclosed porch). Its not that cut and dry in some areas though.
depending on the job, I may pull an outside receptacle off an afci circuit and toss a gfci receptacle in instead of running a new circuit
 

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if it has a roll up door, its a garage
No, I was asking if a garage had a window in it, if your inspectors would make you put an arc fault breaker on it.

Not a garage roll up door. I must have not made that question clear enough.
 

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No, I was asking if a garage had a window in it, if your inspectors would make you put an arc fault breaker on it.

Not a garage roll up door. I must have not made that question clear enough.
now that's just being silly

you were talking about sunrooms or porches
 

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now that's just being silly

you were talking about sunrooms or porches
OK, OK. :laughing:

I was talking about sunrooms, your post about whether if it had a window or not just got me wondering how far they were taking that rule.

I think if its heated or not should be the deciding factor.
 

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I believe the 2014 will require afci if the switch controlling the lighting is in a room that requires afci protection
 

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Semi-Ret Electrician said:
In the US a shower switch (not actually located in the shower) or even a recessed shower light doesn't have to be on a GFCI but I do it all the time.
Except most fixtures say that when installed above a shower/tub they need to be gfci protected. Bastards. OP, what about a dead front gfi? That's gotta be cheaper than a gfi breaker, and will ease your mind for nuisance tripping.

Eta: forgot to add cutting in a 2 gang box for the dead front gfi next to the switch.
 

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and getting back to regularly schedule programming......

could you get away with a gfci switch?


if not, can you cut in a box above or below the existing switch box and install a dead front/blank face gfci?
 

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So a home owner got a list of things to fix. One of them is a switch is too close to a shower. So I have two quick options. One is get a GFI switch (they exist but hard to get), and the other is put a GFI breaker on whatever CCT feeds that switch. My only concern is what there maybe a whole bunch of other things on that CCT, I haven't investigated yet. Can anyone think of any reason why an inspector wouldn't like a GFI breaker protecting more then just the washroom?
Has he been smoking crack with your mayor?
 

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Ive had to do it a few times when I wire sunrooms. There seems to be a real misconception with some inspectors wether or not its a room or a screened in porch.

I always thought the defining line was wether it was heated (living space) or not (enclosed porch). Its not that cut and dry in some areas though.
around here most make you afci if it has windows, heated or not
depending on the job, I may pull an outside receptacle off an afci circuit and toss a gfci receptacle in instead of running a new circuit
Interesting. What if it was a garage with a window in it?
A sunroom would require AFCI protection. A porch, GFCI protection. The difference between the two can be determined by whether it was a habitable room or not.
 

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I believe the 2014 will require afci if the switch controlling the lighting is in a room that requires afci protection
yep, they added the word devices--

(A) Dwelling Units. All 120-volt, single-phase, 15- and
20-ampere branch circuits supplying outlets or devices installed
in dwelling unit kitchens, family rooms, dining
rooms, living rooms, parlors, libraries, dens, bedrooms,
sunrooms, recreation rooms, closets, hallways, laundry areas,
or similar rooms or areas shall be protected by any of
the means described in 210.12(A)(1) through (6):

Let's remember the OP is in Canada
 
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