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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone used the housings that are supposedly air-tight? I am in my own home build and want to eliminate the poly pans/acoustical sealing for the pots as I have always done in the past if possible. Interested if anyone has experience and if these cans are worth using or should I stick to the old poly method.

I am looking at using Lithonia lighting.

They make a standard 6" housing L7XLED-T24 housing that is Airtight/IC rated however you have to buy an optional gasket.
They also make a premium 6" housing LC6LED-T24 which comes with a plastic frame and electrical j-box and has a foam gasket pre installed for the drywall to seal against.
The trim/light is a P-Series led module which would also use a foam gasket to aid in sealing.
 

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I've used quite a few air-tight IC rated cans.. they seem to work just fine.

That said, for my own house I would still go with boots and tape them up real nice. The air seal on the building envelope is way more important than insulation even. So make sure everything is sealed perfectly!
 

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I've used quite a few air-tight IC rated cans.. they seem to work just fine.

That said, for my own house I would still go with boots and tape them up real nice. The air seal on the building envelope is way more important than insulation even. So make sure everything is sealed perfectly!
Frunk is right - did I say that out loud?
Air loc/air tight still let air thru. The governing bodies just feel the amount is such a small amount, they ignore it.
My house, bag it!

.
 

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Just my 2 cents here.
In ont. our building inspectors I deal with don't all recognize the air tight approval anyway.
American approvals don't mean much to the building department for some reason.
I have had that argument many times.
I don't care about the bags all that much.
If you figure in all the other holes you have in your home it is minimal air leakage compared to, exhaust fans in bathrms, range hoods , air exchangers, and yes even your clothes dryer.
Some brands of pots have much larger holes for leakage than others for sure, but still nothing compared to other equipment.


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Estwing magic
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Blue boot it for two reasons - one, so-called air tight cans are sieves and, two, if you get condensation on those cans it can leak down and leave water marks on your ceiling.
 

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What are these boots that you all are taking about? It's been a while since I've done residential, I feel like I'm missing out on the latest and greatest residential innovations.
 

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I,d be more concerned that the insulation is covered everywhere evenly . They like to cheat you the farther away from the attic access you get, the less depth you get.
If you get good coverage over your lights no worries of condensation either.
Water doesn't drip out if your exhaust fans does it?
And they are piped straight outside.


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I,d be more concerned that the insulation is covered everywhere evenly . They like to cheat you the farther away from the attic access you get, the less depth you get.
If you get good coverage over your lights no worries of condensation either.
Water doesn't drip out if your exhaust fans does it?
And they are piped straight outside.


Sent from my iPhone using electriciantalk.com
contractor buddy of mine used to mark the depth of the insulation on the trusses.
Easy to see if the insulators tried to cheat him.
 

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Estwing magic
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I,d be more concerned that the insulation is covered everywhere evenly . They like to cheat you the farther away from the attic access you get, the less depth you get.
If you get good coverage over your lights no worries of condensation either.
Water doesn't drip out if your exhaust fans does it?
And they are piped straight outside.


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Exhaust fan doesn't produce heat.
 

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What are these boots that you all are taking about? It's been a while since I've done residential, I feel like I'm missing out on the latest and greatest residential innovations.

 

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Just my 2 cents guys .
Done it in my own home with out boots and no regrets other than blinking lights.
Can't seem to get any one to use the dimmers!
Heat builds up after being in for hrs and occasional trip thermal.
Not often but once in a blue moon.


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mytiburon said:
Has anyone used the housings that are supposedly air-tight? I am in my own home build and want to eliminate the poly pans/acoustical sealing for the pots as I have always done in the past if possible. Interested if anyone has experience and if these cans are worth using or should I stick to the old poly method. I am looking at using Lithonia lighting. They make a standard 6" housing L7XLED-T24 housing that is Airtight/IC rated however you have to buy an optional gasket. They also make a premium 6" housing LC6LED-T24 which comes with a plastic frame and electrical j-box and has a foam gasket pre installed for the drywall to seal against. The trim/light is a P-Series led module which would also use a foam gasket to aid in sealing.
I used air tight cans, with shower trims and caulked all drywall penetrations, foil taped and caulked all boxes at rough. Day of extra work on my personal house. 5 star plus energy rating equals lifetime of savings. You can buy a lot of caulking and foil tape for 100$ and if you got tin knocker buddies get the good tape for free
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Lots of various opinions, interesting enough I found a special bulletin regarding these online from Airdrie from their home inspectors (because some inspectors were not allowing them) and they had to clear up confusion.They had 3 methods of installing recessed lighting into ceilings. Their preferred method (oddly enough) is air tight/ic fixtures directly into insulation, they said most people do not install properly at trim stage with gaskets and that is why they do not seal properly. This option has best insulation. Second best was a poly pan, this was second because pan displaces too much information and more likely to leak air over pan seems. Option 3 was regular old sheet of poly. I will link article later if I can find it again.
 

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I used air tight cans, with shower trims and caulked all drywall penetrations, foil taped and caulked all boxes at rough. Day of extra work on my personal house. 5 star plus energy rating equals lifetime of savings. You can buy a lot of caulking and foil tape for 100$ and if you got tin knocker buddies get the good tape for free
What this guy said, he knows what he's talking about.

Spend the time, do the extra work up front. A good seal is the most important factor to energy efficiency (or lack of) these days. You can have R50 insulation, but if air is blowing through the cracks and holes.. it won't matter.

Googling/Youtube some videos on "passive house" and not that you need to build to the same standard as them, but use some of their techniques for making a home much more energy efficient, for little to no cost up front.

For my own home I would use IC/AirTight cans in a boot taped COMPLETELY sealed, and then stuff more insulation in the voids of the boots between the can and plastic. I've been researching house construction methods for a while now because I want to build in a couple years and build some form of an eco-energy / carbon neutral / passive type house. They're going to the be the standard in 10 years as energy rates go up and incomes keep getting more strapped. People won't be able to afford $500+/mo energy bills in winter/summer.
 
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