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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It seems like there are more jobs available for people now than in the months prior. Also the requirements seem to be less stringent. Many electrical contractors that post on places like Indeed are not asking for licenses and just want warm bodies. Over the past year or so most of the contractors were asking for mandatory background checks but they don’t seem to be putting that in the description as much anymore.

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Connecticut is offering $1,000 to 10,000 jobless workers that find full-time work and hold the job for at least 6 weeks. Oklahoma and Montana have similar plans to pay $1,200 to 20,000 jobless workers who can hold on to a full time job for at least 4 weeks.

Businesses are also offering signing bonuses to go to work for them. Like Amazon, Ollie’s Bargain Outlet, Sheetz convenience stores just to name a few.
 

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The big box store I work at has they are hiring message broadcast over intercom like every 15 minutes, as well as they are hiring in spanish. So yeah businesses are desperate for people to stop watching netflix in their underwear and get back to work.

Although some politicians and news media want us closed up tight again? To that I don't see how the economy could survive another closing.

Glad to see it open and pray it stays open.
 

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Some people who held public-facing jobs have decided they don't want another one similar. At the beginning of the shutdowns last year, a lot of workers ran and took non-shut down jobs and will remain there. Workers in the public facing jobs have seen some of the worst of society.
 

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Some people who held public-facing jobs have decided they don't want another one similar. At the beginning of the shutdowns last year, a lot of workers ran and took non-shut down jobs and will remain there. Workers in the public facing jobs have seen some of the worst of society.
That was a big motivator for me to look towards Trades as my 2nd Career. No pandemic can stop people needing stuff fixed or installed.
 

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Newsflash - If there ever was a time to go out and get a job, ITS RIGHT NOW!!!

All the construction/trade companies in this area are offering sing on bonuses for anyone who makes it past 90 days. Employers are hiring guys with little to no experience for what it took some of us years to make. They seriously just need people who will show up to work every day and WORK!! I can’t believe so many people are still unemployed.

Might as well get it while the getting is good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
This is just my own personal observation of what is happening. Millennials just don't want to work for low wages preforming tasks that require physical effort. The new model is to go to school and get a masters degree and make the big bucks. Most of them fail to reach their goals and end up discouraged and upset that they can't land high paying jobs so they kind of give up. They want to do their own thing like u-tube videos or selling stuff on e-bay. They see other millennials making ridiculous amounts of money and try to copy them but end up failing. Millennials want to combine their passion with profit and work on projects they feel passionate about, rather than helping someone else reach their profit benchmark. Unfortunately most of them fail but continue trying new things to achieve their goals thinking that some day they will get rich working for themselves.
 

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This is just my own personal observation of what is happening. Millennials just don't want to work for low wages preforming tasks that require physical effort. The new model is to go to school and get a masters degree and make the big bucks. Most of them fail to reach their goals and end up discouraged and upset that they can't land high paying jobs so they kind of give up. They want to do their own thing like u-tube videos or selling stuff on e-bay. They see other millennials making ridiculous amounts of money and try to copy them but end up failing. Millennials want to combine their passion with profit and work on projects they feel passionate about, rather than helping someone else reach their profit benchmark. Unfortunately most of them fail but continue trying new things to achieve their goals thinking that some day they will get rich working for themselves.
Well that's one way of looking at it, from a boomer-esque bubble. But the reality that Millennials live in is different from yours and mine.

The new model was thrust upon every generation after Reganism went into full swing with Clinton's passage of NAFTA. No factories, no unions, and no benefits or pensions - and the Millennials not having these things or the advantages of those things being commonplace are blamed on their own lack of trying, their unwillingness to try, when it's really just the reality they're living in and no fault of their own. "I did it so you can to" doesn't apply, they're not living in the same world you are.

They fill out applications with questions like:
“Why should we hire you over all our other applicants?”
“Describe yourself in three words.”
“How badly do you want this job?”


They were TOLD you have to go to college or you will fail. Or at least learn a trade as a fallback - but let's face it - you can't fairly define everyone as lazy because they aren't interested in bending pipe or climbing roof trusses. Most of us grew up in a time when you could drive a truck, or work in a factory or an assembly line, and still buy a decent house and have medical coverage and maybe a pension, maybe not. At least IRAs and Savings accounts paid a decent interest.

They pushed everyone into college under the threat of a lifetime of failure, w/o considering that many college grads, especially those who should never have gone to college and didn't do particularly well in school, but are were perfectly suited to bolt seats into cars or pack products onto pallets or build furniture - wouldn't qualify to work at jobs that demand degrees even if they have the degree. Every country needs simple, easily trainable jobs for the mediocre - that pay realistic livable wages, and those jobs were lost.

With so many college grads vyying for fewer college degree required positions, corporations simply started demanding applicants have degrees for positions that traditionally never required them. Because why not, plus, an employee with a student loan debt is easily controllable. Easier to manipulate when they don't have the financial power to tell an overbearing boss or a crazy schedule or demands for constant overtime be worked under a salary a scheme can't yell you to GFY.

Many give up when they can't land high paying jobs with their degree because that issue was a new thing for degreed graduates. In the 80's and 90's there were more graduates of law schools than there were practicing lawyers. The ones not landing lawyer jobs become paralegals, pushing the paralegals w/o degrees out of the field. More college grads does not mean more positions for them to take, and that was the great lie that sparked the Occupy Wall Street movement.

It's very easy to look at one person in the millennial position and figure out where they failed and what they have to do to "pick themselves up by their bootstraps and become a success like dad" but, you can't apply that solution to an entire generation whose country sold them and every successive generation out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
Well that's one way of looking at it, from a boomer-esque bubble. But the reality that Millennials live in is different from yours and mine.

The new model was thrust upon every generation after Reganism went into full swing with Clinton's passage of NAFTA. No factories, no unions, and no benefits or pensions - and the Millennials not having these things or the advantages of those things being commonplace are blamed on their own lack of trying, their unwillingness to try, when it's really just the reality they're living in and no fault of their own. "I did it so you can to" doesn't apply, they're not living in the same world you are.

They fill out applications with questions like:
“Why should we hire you over all our other applicants?”
“Describe yourself in three words.”
“How badly do you want this job?”


They were TOLD you have to go to college or you will fail. Or at least learn a trade as a fallback - but let's face it - you can't fairly define everyone as lazy because they aren't interested in bending pipe or climbing roof trusses. Most of us grew up in a time when you could drive a truck, or work in a factory or an assembly line, and still buy a decent house and have medical coverage and maybe a pension, maybe not. At least IRAs and Savings accounts paid a decent interest.

They pushed everyone into college under the threat of a lifetime of failure, w/o considering that many college grads, especially those who should never have gone to college and didn't do particularly well in school, but are were perfectly suited to bolt seats into cars or pack products onto pallets or build furniture - wouldn't qualify to work at jobs that demand degrees even if they have the degree. Every country needs simple, easily trainable jobs for the mediocre - that pay realistic livable wages, and those jobs were lost.

With so many college grads vyying for fewer college degree required positions, corporations simply started demanding applicants have degrees for positions that traditionally never required them. Because why not, plus, an employee with a student loan debt is easily controllable. Easier to manipulate when they don't have the financial power to tell an overbearing boss or a crazy schedule or demands for constant overtime be worked under a salary a scheme can't yell you to GFY.

Many give up when they can't land high paying jobs with their degree because that issue was a new thing for degreed graduates. In the 80's and 90's there were more graduates of law schools than there were practicing lawyers. The ones not landing lawyer jobs become paralegals, pushing the paralegals w/o degrees out of the field. More college grads does not mean more positions for them to take, and that was the great lie that sparked the Occupy Wall Street movement.

It's very easy to look at one person in the millennial position and figure out where they failed and what they have to do to "pick themselves up by their bootstraps and become a success like dad" but, you can't apply that solution to an entire generation whose country sold them and every successive generation out.
I agree with what you're saying. I shouldn't be making blanket statements about Millennials. The hiring process is much more difficult for them than it was in the past.
I think my point is that they see some of their friends making lots of money doing very little and they are striving for that but it seems to elude them. You can't blame them for trying especially when it's so hard to earn enough to live a decent life working in a factory turning wrenches all day.
 

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All the construction/trade companies in this area are offering sing on bonuses for anyone who makes it past 90 days.
But I bet they're not giving bonuses to their long-term employees.........

If I were a loyal employee who had stayed with a company for years and I saw a new hire get a bonus simply for being hired, and I got nothing, I'd most likely be a bit resentful

If these hiring bonuses continue and the existing employees get nothing, we may see some sort of a backlash........
 

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This is just my own personal observation of what is happening. Millennials just don't want to work for low wages preforming tasks that require physical effort. The new model is to go to school and get a masters degree and make the big bucks. Most of them fail to reach their goals and end up discouraged and upset that they can't land high paying jobs so they kind of give up. They want to do their own thing like u-tube videos or selling stuff on e-bay. They see other millennials making ridiculous amounts of money and try to copy them but end up failing. Millennials want to combine their passion with profit and work on projects they feel passionate about, rather than helping someone else reach their profit benchmark. Unfortunately most of them fail but continue trying new things to achieve their goals thinking that some day they will get rich working for themselves.
This has been my experiance with ALL the younger kids we have tried to hire. I have had my best luck with guys 30 or older. They show up, work, and actually enjoy electrical work and/or learning new aspects of the trade. Now this doesn't mean they are all bad but its a lot harder to find ones that want to do manual labor and not just sit at a computer.
Well that's one way of looking at it, from a boomer-esque bubble. But the reality that Millennials live in is different from yours and mine.

The new model was thrust upon every generation after Reganism went into full swing with Clinton's passage of NAFTA. No factories, no unions, and no benefits or pensions - and the Millennials not having these things or the advantages of those things being commonplace are blamed on their own lack of trying, their unwillingness to try, when it's really just the reality they're living in and no fault of their own. "I did it so you can to" doesn't apply, they're not living in the same world you are.

They fill out applications with questions like:
“Why should we hire you over all our other applicants?”
“Describe yourself in three words.”
“How badly do you want this job?”


They were TOLD you have to go to college or you will fail. Or at least learn a trade as a fallback - but let's face it - you can't fairly define everyone as lazy because they aren't interested in bending pipe or climbing roof trusses. Most of us grew up in a time when you could drive a truck, or work in a factory or an assembly line, and still buy a decent house and have medical coverage and maybe a pension, maybe not. At least IRAs and Savings accounts paid a decent interest.

They pushed everyone into college under the threat of a lifetime of failure, w/o considering that many college grads, especially those who should never have gone to college and didn't do particularly well in school, but are were perfectly suited to bolt seats into cars or pack products onto pallets or build furniture - wouldn't qualify to work at jobs that demand degrees even if they have the degree. Every country needs simple, easily trainable jobs for the mediocre - that pay realistic livable wages, and those jobs were lost.

With so many college grads vyying for fewer college degree required positions, corporations simply started demanding applicants have degrees for positions that traditionally never required them. Because why not, plus, an employee with a student loan debt is easily controllable. Easier to manipulate when they don't have the financial power to tell an overbearing boss or a crazy schedule or demands for constant overtime be worked under a salary a scheme can't yell you to GFY.

Many give up when they can't land high paying jobs with their degree because that issue was a new thing for degreed graduates. In the 80's and 90's there were more graduates of law schools than there were practicing lawyers. The ones not landing lawyer jobs become paralegals, pushing the paralegals w/o degrees out of the field. More college grads does not mean more positions for them to take, and that was the great lie that sparked the Occupy Wall Street movement.

It's very easy to look at one person in the millennial position and figure out where they failed and what they have to do to "pick themselves up by their bootstraps and become a success like dad" but, you can't apply that solution to an entire generation whose country sold them and every successive generation out.
It amazes me how you stick up for ANYONE in the union or make out EVERYONE who is not in a union to be a victim in most of your posts. And EVERY contractor or company is evil, money hungry, and could care less about their employee's. However if someone speaks ill about a group/generation (not all, but the majority) who don't want to work, collect free money or start at the top of their field from day one you get upset that they are being generalized and need to be protected. We all generalize at times (and so do you).

I agree with Easy and have had a hard time finding someone who wants to work that is younger than 30. I'm not saying they don't exist but it is much harder finding someone that age now who wants to work. I had one kid (20 years old), who showed up 15 min late on day one (starting at $30 an hour plus benefits that start after 3 months) he quit on day 1 saying there was too much driving. I had him meet us at a job that was 45 minutes away in the morning and probably an hour on his way home. Keep in mind we are in Los Angeles and the job was about 20 miles or less from our office. His tasks for that day were to help carry tools (everyone carries tools) and pull wire. He had a 30 min lunch, and two 15 min breaks to do what ever he wants to do. We had to tell him 4 times to get off his phone when not on his breaks, he would roll his eyes. Other young people we tried had similar work ethic issues. Every body works steady and NOT in a rush of any kind on our jobs. Our main goal is to hire someone with a good attitude who wants to learn. EVERYONE is treated with respect from day one.
 

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This has been my experiance with ALL the younger kids we have tried to hire. I have had my best luck with guys 30 or older. They show up, work, and actually enjoy electrical work and/or learning new aspects of the trade. Now this doesn't mean they are all bad but its a lot harder to find ones that want to do manual labor and not just sit at a computer.


It amazes me how you stick up for ANYONE in the union or make out EVERYONE who is not in a union to be a victim in most of your posts. And EVERY contractor or company is evil, money hungry, and could care less about their employee's. However if someone speaks ill about a group/generation (not all, but the majority) who don't want to work, collect free money or start at the top of their field from day one you get upset that they are being generalized and need to be protected. We all generalize at times (and so do you).
Fair enough - I stick up for people. I'll wear that criticism like a badge of honor. I don;t claim all nonunion workers are exploited - most are. I do find it amazing and highly suspect that all the nonunion participants here claim they're not the ones exploiting or being exploited though, that's just and AMAZING coincidence. So forgive me for harboring reservations whenever ant nonunion employer bellows and boasts about how well they treat their workers.

And no, graduates do not demand to start at the top of their fields - but graduates filling upper level positions are being offered ridiculously low starting wages and that is a fact. The posts right on this board from recruiters who refuse to disclose what they're paying but boast about serving "fortune 500 customers" are an example of how corporations today will tell you anything and give you anything except a good realistic wage, as if pulling wire for a contractor working at Bristol-Meyers-Squibb puts food on the table or pays the rent.

I'm not going to sit by and listen to people who claim 2 entire generations are lazy unmotivated kids with unrealistic hopes. 1/2 the daily traffic in my town on tertiary highways and probably yours as well are millennials and Gen Z's running from job 1 to job 2 or job 3 - full time jobs are unheard of because Home Depot and Walmart and many many other employers don't want the burden of mandatory health care coverage triggered.
I agree with Easy and have had a hard time finding someone who wants to work that is younger than 30. I'm not saying they don't exist but it is much harder finding someone that age now who wants to work. I had one kid (20 years old), who showed up 15 min late on day one (starting at $30 an hour plus benefits that start after 3 months) he quit on day 1 saying there was too much driving. I had him meet us at a job that was 45 minutes away in the morning and probably an hour on his way home. Keep in mind we are in Los Angeles and the job was about 20 miles or less from our office. His tasks for that day were to help carry tools (everyone carries tools) and pull wire. He had a 30 min lunch, and two 15 min breaks to do what ever he wants to do. We had to tell him 4 times to get off his phone when not on his breaks, he would roll his eyes. Other young people we tried had similar work ethic issues. Every body works steady and NOT in a rush of any kind on our jobs. Our main goal is to hire someone with a good attitude who wants to learn. EVERYONE is treated with respect from day one.
That is an amazing story Moto. Amazing. There's posts on the IBEW board of all these people vyying to get into the L.A. local IBEW and I know the apprenticeship doesn't start at 30 an hour. I'm sure you agree that you've got to kiss a few frogs before you find your princess. Not every one of our apprentices works out either in fact, 50% don't make it to the journeymanship. Though it may annoy you the the cream rises to the top, you can't deny that a lot of people you encounter are likely just waiting for a real serious job, and you're left choosing amonge the crumbs left behind by the better opportunities. This has been a thing nonunion employers have had to contend with LONG before Covid or unemployment augmentation.
 

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It seems like there are more jobs available for people now than in the months prior. Also the requirements seem to be less stringent. Many electrical contractors that post on places like Indeed are not asking for licenses and just want warm bodies. Over the past year or so most of the contractors were asking for mandatory background checks but they don’t seem to be putting that in the description as much anymore.

View attachment 157427
Here is the answer from the grandaughter of one of my neighbors... "Yeah, my company tried to call me back,, but why should I go back when the government sends me a check every month?" I wonder how our kids are going to be able to deal with our incredible national debt?!
 

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Chief Flunky
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Here is the answer from the grandaughter of one of my neighbors... "Yeah, my company tried to call me back,, but why should I go back when the government sends me a check every month?" I wonder how our kids are going to be able to deal with our incredible national debt?!
Easy. At some point and we are peering over the edge your country becomes a credit risk and suddenly you can’t sell bonds except at crazy interest or for pennies in the dollar. Then it eats you alive as interest rates rise and suddenly you can’t service the debt without inflating it away. You can’t buy imports anymore because your currency is worthless and you can’t export for the same reason.

Eventually interest rates and inflation come back down but not before wiping all the excess debt off the books. This has played itself out many times in many countries. It really doesn’t matter what the government or the citizenry does…the debt WILL be paid. It’s basic economics.

Ok so another example. In most states you might get $300 a week from state unemployment. Right now Biden is paying $300 a week too for a total of $600 a week. Divide by 40 hours…that’s $15/hour assuming you can get a full time job. The only way unemployment works is if you are limited on how long you can collect and limited on what percentage of your income or at least less than minimum wage you can collect or people won’t want to work and just find ways around the system.
 

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Ok so another example. In most states you might get $300 a week from state unemployment. Right now Biden is paying $300 a week too for a total of $600 a week. Divide by 40 hours…that’s $15/hour assuming you can get a full time job. The only way unemployment works is if you are limited on how long you can collect and limited on what percentage of your income or at least less than minimum wage you can collect or people won’t want to work and just find ways around the system.
There is another basic problem... We had a thread on ET about a year ago where I shared that I ran a SH for 5 years, Over that period of time I had hired 7 different millennials (At $15 an hour plus full benefits) and every one of them quit within 6 months.... each one had the same complaint, "the work was too hard." I ran into one of them several months later and he was selling popcorn at a theatre!!!! :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes:
 
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