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meaning....

when installing your circuits, is there a trade practice of making sure your furnace is on one side, water heater on the other.

2 poles at the top or at the bottom or do you just make sure the amperage is as close to even on both sides.
 

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Because there are some panels that specify where a 100 amp breaker has to go (top position nearest main) I load the largest breakers to the smallest, top to bottom respectively.

I believe the theory is that you keep the largest breakers that draw the most current closer to the main, that way the rest of the buss doesn't heat up.
 

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Whidbey said:
Because there are some panels that specify where a 100 amp breaker has to go (top position nearest main) I load the largest breakers to the smallest, top to bottom respectively. I believe the theory is that you keep the largest breakers that draw the most current closer to the main, that way the rest of the buss doesn't heat up.
Thats how i was always tought. Not sure if it actually does anything besides looks like you know what youre doing.
 

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I generally put all my 240 volt on one side. Higher amps always start at the top ie first goes 90 for the heat, 40 oven 30 A/C ect. Then 20 amps then 15 amps last. Reason for heavier loads on one side lighter on the other being less stress on the buss tabs.

But that's my unwritten rule. Truth is it doesn't matter. Panel cover might ask for something rarely but other than that the NEC doesn't care.
 

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I do it like the other guys said, starting with larger breakers on top and 15's on bottom, but I do try to keep circuits that correspond in a certain area together in the panel as much as possible. I Also try to leave top spaces open in case they add an interlock, or anything else in the future.
 

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This is ridiculous. If there is a manufacturer who says that higher amperage breakers have to be close to the main, I want to know who it is. If a panel can't handle completely random breaker placement, I won't buy it.
 

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Many panel will give a max amperage allowed per stab. Thus in most residential panels you cannot have a dp 100 across from a dp 60. I think max is 125 amps in most cases.
 
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If you think about it then you will realize that the further down the bus that the larger loads are placed will create more heat for the entire length of the bus. Not a code issue but that is why I usually install my 240 larger loads at the top.

I also do it like that because I like the uniformity of it. Big deal right....:no:
 
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If you think about it then you will realize that the further down the bus that the larger loads are placed will create more heat for the entire length of the bus. Not a code issue but that is why I usually install my 240 larger loads at the top.

I also do it like that because I like the uniformity of it. Big deal right....:no:
I have to agree with that, spot on:thumbup:
 

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Other than the concept of not putting 2 real high ampacity breakers across from each other, I don't see much validity to the concept of keeping big breakers near the main, except in theoretical practice.

Anthropogenic Panel Warming? :laughing:

Maybe someone has some graphs or charts or something to prove it's real.
 

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If you think about it then you will realize that the further down the bus that the larger loads are placed will create more heat for the entire length of the bus. Not a code issue but that is why I usually install my 240 larger loads at the top.

I also do it like that because I like the uniformity of it. Big deal right....:no:
Yes there is voltage drop on the length of the bus and that voltage drop will produce heat, but on the very short distance, I would doubt that the voltage drop would even be a tenth of a volt. I would expect the heat produced within the breaker itself would exceed that that is produced by the voltage drop along the length of the panel bus.
 

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I dunno. What about a 200A panel feeding a 150A sub?
I did not say that the panel couldn't handle it-- I install many 200 amp panels with fed thru lugs-- that is 200 amps feeding another panel. The fact is that in a residence the loads are not usually a big issue except for perhaps large heating units.

I was trying to give a reason why someone may put the large loads up top
 

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There's no real rule but when I was doing residential I tried a few different strategies.

One was, group all the kitchen circuits together - range, fridge, microwave, dishwasher, warming drawer, countertop receps and lighting circuit. Everything else if possible I would try to group by floors, but wasn't too hardcore about it. I figured this would be easier for the homeowner to find something.

Another was to put all the 2-pole breakers on top and all the single pole 15s on the bottom. Looked a little bit neater, but not sure if anyone noticed. It may have been a little bit faster.

Most commercial/industrial new construction jobs are going to come with a panel schedule, so you can't really get creative there. Maybe on a renovation or a panel change.
 
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