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I like ceiling fans & EMT
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How often do they have contractors over?!
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
How about putting a double gang box on the inside.
Install a regular standard receptacle, pig tail off to a GFCI receptacle, then feed the outside receptacle off the GFCI receptacle.
Swap the outside GFCI for a standard receptacle.
Trip the GFCI on the inside receptacle.
Only you can reset it from inside.
The outside receptacle is protected.
You still have a standard receptacle that stays ON.

Or add a switch on the wall above the inside receptacle and drop a two wire down to the receptacle. Switch the wire going outside.
I did the switch thing so we don't have to go outside to plug or unplug the Christmas lights.
Good idea with the switch, etc., on the inside. What about limiting current? The GFCI is required by code and is common sense, but they would like to limit current so that someone doesn't try to run heavy duty tools/equipment on that line. Their computers need to be running 24/7 and if the outside outlet overloads the line and trips the breaker the computers will not automatically power up
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
You guys are tough.

The limiting factors as listed were the difficulty in pulling another line to this location. A mistake was made and I am thinking it through to avoid a pain in the but fishing, cutting, and wall/ceiling repair job.

Yes they can, and do provide the contractors with a 20 amp extension cord, but it appears many of you have never worked with contractors. I have seen them jumper into the bus bars from the meter. So the burden is on this side to protect the "critical" office equipment. If a person runs their small business in an office at home then it IS critical. Maybe you only play video games on your PC but there are some high functioning smart people who make a living and rely on PCs and even servers. Yes a server in a home office!

Being an engineer I am a problem solver and as mentioned focus primarily in control systems where the rules are quite different than residential electrical. I am at least smart enough to put this out there and risk embarassment and snide remarks to see if it is a fix that is overdone, if it is even legal, if it makes sense, if there is a better way to do it since the collective wisdom of this group is immense.

For those who posted considerate ideas thank you. For the insulters and those who pile on, I am glad I don't work with you. And I am sure that others wish they didn't.

Thanks,
Greg
 

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I like ceiling fans & EMT
Former commercial, occasional (small) residential
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757 Posts
I dont think the majority here are trying to insult you. But to most of us it looks like you're trying to fix a problem that does not exist.

Wouldnt power outages take them out more frequently than an errant contractor? Perhaps a battery backup for the computers would solve multiple issues.
 

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Estwing magic
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You guys are tough.

The limiting factors as listed were the difficulty in pulling another line to this location. A mistake was made and I am thinking it through to avoid a pain in the but fishing, cutting, and wall/ceiling repair job.

Yes they can, and do provide the contractors with a 20 amp extension cord, but it appears many of you have never worked with contractors. I have seen them jumper into the bus bars from the meter. So the burden is on this side to protect the "critical" office equipment. If a person runs their small business in an office at home then it IS critical. Maybe you only play video games on your PC but there are some high functioning smart people who make a living and rely on PCs and even servers. Yes a server in a home office!

Being an engineer I am a problem solver and as mentioned focus primarily in control systems where the rules are quite different than residential electrical. I am at least smart enough to put this out there and risk embarassment and snide remarks to see if it is a fix that is overdone, if it is even legal, if it makes sense, if there is a better way to do it since the collective wisdom of this group is immense.

For those who posted considerate ideas thank you. For the insulters and those who pile on, I am glad I don't work with you. And I am sure that others wish they didn't.

Thanks,
Greg
Huh? We’re being nice to you. Normally, we throw engineers under the bus around here. 🤣

In Canada, exterior receptacles at ground level need to be on a dedicated circuit so what you’re planning is non-compliant here. It also sounds like you need a dedicated service receptacle for contractor use for a reason that hasn’t been explained. That means two circuits. Maybe the best way to do it is to exit the house close to the panel and run conduit on the outside of the house to the receptacle locations.

If you want this done right, the first thing you do is see what colour the customer’s gold card is. Money is a great problem solver.
 

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DIYer Extrodinaire
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You guys are tough.

The limiting factors as listed were the difficulty in pulling another line to this location. A mistake was made and I am thinking it through to avoid a pain in the but fishing, cutting, and wall/ceiling repair job.

Yes they can, and do provide the contractors with a 20 amp extension cord, but it appears many of you have never worked with contractors. I have seen them jumper into the bus bars from the meter. So the burden is on this side to protect the "critical" office equipment. If a person runs their small business in an office at home then it IS critical. Maybe you only play video games on your PC but there are some high functioning smart people who make a living and rely on PCs and even servers. Yes a server in a home office!
From an engineeering standpoint, this still makes no sense.

You have a contractor with tools/equipment that require more than ~10A
Your solution is to limit them to 10A.
How does the work get done ?

There is DIY, but then there is DIY as cheap as I can possibly do.

Either run a new circuit outside, It's not that hard to do.
Or run a new circuit to their PC.

A)Unless they have Italian granite walls, it's NOT hard to do.
b) drywallers are cheap
 

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I like ceiling fans & EMT
Former commercial, occasional (small) residential
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There has got to be more to the story.

Maybe the neighbors are stealing their power and he's willing to let them have up to 10 amps.

Maybe the yard guys are using plug in tools and the HO thinks they're costing them too much in electricity.

They are also concerned about "noise on the line"-- what noise comes from 20a but not 10?
 

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Hackenschmidt
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The further you follow this one down the rabbit hole, the more I think this is a high school kid.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Appreciate the help from those who actually have something to contribute. Due to serious illness I have foggy head which means sometimes I need some quick feedback from capable people. I wanted to see if there was some simple fix that I wasn't considering. It is an odd situation and not as easy to fix as might normally be done. It is now much more clear what the options are, so my instincts were right in asking the question.

THIS POST HAS GENERATED PLENTY OF USEFUL FEEDBACK AND SOME GOOD IDEAS. THANK YOU TO THOSE WHO CONTRIBUTED TO A POSITIVE DISCUSSION. IT IS MUCH APPRECIATED.

Due to long term illness, my patience is thin (think of having the flu every day) so when people pop off without even reading the actual details it is beyond annoying. I won't call you out by name but if you read the thread from start to finish a couple names consitently provide absolutely no valuable commentary. And they actually confuse the issue because of not reading the initial post.

It is a very simple situation. There is no rabbit hole and it was explained in detail in the first post. For those who speak first without bothering to read what was given in Post #1:
  1. Customer was smart enough to have an outside outlet put in during a stripping and replacement of the exterior surface of the home.
  2. The oversight was not taking into account that it was from the same line as half the home office/computers.
  3. To put in a new run that doesn't look like a backwoods fix is tough because it has a cathedral ceiling and and an addition that makes the connecting attic nearly impossible to access.
  4. The 10 amp current limiting was ONLY to prevent tripping the breaker while this exterior outlet is connected to the line for home office/computers. I understand that a battery backup should be in the system regardless of what else is or isn't wired into the same line. Even a dedicated line.
  5. The contractor issue is that even if they are provided a 20 amp GFCI connection, it is conceivable that they will go ahead and use the other outlet because why wouldn't they? And if they trip the breaker it would then cause problems potentially. (FYI - I have purchased and had installed dozens of UPS units in critical situations and they can cause as many problems as they solve.)
Thanks to all
 

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I like ceiling fans & EMT
Former commercial, occasional (small) residential
Joined
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757 Posts
You still havent answered the question that a lot of us have asked, which is, how often do they have contractors over with 20a tools? In the entirety of houses I've lived in, and every commercial property I've worked on, I cant recall a contractor or yard worker with a tool tripping a breaker, unless it was a GFCI breaker.

I think the outlet cover with a lock was the best idea.
 
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