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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
small job I was working on this week. we had to move a ses about 8 feet away.
prints called for a nema type 3r enclosure over the original feeder conduits with splices inside.
not the best pic included. but the inspector failed the modifications made to the box. foreman cut a window in the bottom. this is on a slab outside.
the original install had obviously duct taped all the conduits together for their stub up. there was no way to get connectors etc onto the conduits without jackhammering the concrete and then somehow trying to get seperation and keep them straight.
so my question for the community is: how would you of done it and handled the situation? as a apprentice this kind of situation makes me question if I want to move up in rank and take on that kind of stress, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
forgot to note. the top of the box had to remain below 22 in. because they eventually are building a floor over it with a access hatch. (choir room)
 

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I would have cut the opening so that it fit exactly around the conduits, then sealed the box up around the conduits.

Everyone wants more money but nobody wants the pressure and headaches. Sometimes it's worth it, sometimes it's not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I would have cut the opening so that it fit exactly around the conduits, then sealed the box up around the conduits.

Everyone wants more money but nobody wants the pressure and headaches. Sometimes it's worth it, sometimes it's not.
agree. these county "general" inspectors were looking for blood though. I dont think he would of passed it even then. he called in his superior who just agreed with him and said quote "he is supremely correct in that this is a safety issue" , "it could flood and water would get underneath and then end up going into the conduits".
my foreman asked why the gear sections are not held to this standard then. as most do not have sealed bottoms etc. all the guy could say is we arebt goi g to get into that.
 

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Sad, to say but what is really unsafe about concrete in the bottom of a box? I'm not saying I'd have done it that way, but if it's sealed to the floor, and we all know concrete is non-combustible. Rough it was poor at best, proper separation needs to happen for proper fitting install etc.

If I had encountered this situation I'd have called the AHJ and asked them just to see if they would have wanted to bust out some concrete or would be ok with box cut to fit.

TWN
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Sad, to say but what is really unsafe about concrete in the bottom of a box? I'm not saying I'd have done it that way, but if it's sealed to the floor, and we all know concrete is non-combustible. Rough it was poor at best, proper separation needs to happen for proper fitting install etc.

If I had encountered this situation I'd have called the AHJ and asked them just to see if they would have wanted to bust out some concrete or would be ok with box cut to fit.

TWN
that would of been a great idea. not sure what is going to happen now. just kind of feel bad for the church. no power this sunday. its going to be dark in that building and over a 100 degrees this sunday.
 

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I assume all of the conductors have the "w" rating (wet location).

If splices rated for wet locations were used, and the ground bar had been up high on one of the sides of the box, I would have fought the inspection by calling the state.
 

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fistofbolts said:
"he is supremely correct in that this is a safety issue" , "it could flood and water would get underneath and then end up going into the conduits"
Wait a minute. His argument for it not being safe is that it MIGHT flood......... INSIDE the church, and water could enter the box and conduits. I would say he is "supremely" a total dill hole!!! Nothing is safe from "what if's".
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I assume all of the conductors have the "w" rating (wet location).

If splices rated for wet locations were used, and the ground bar had been up high on one of the sides of the box, I would have fought the inspection by calling the state.
thanks. they were the right splices. I will give a update when I find out what happens. I just cant see ripping this all apart and somehow getting a new box in. that poor church could be down a week further. what a mess.
 

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Yeah maricopa can be real ****s, actually that goes for all the counties, inspectors don't know anything.

I'd argue it though, open bottom equipment is allowed and there isn't anything preventing us from making knockouts and cutouts in enclosures. Unless that box had a label saying don't cut a big square hole here which I kinda doubt :laughing:
 

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Conduits enter service sections all the time thru open bottoms.

Did he cite a code section?

I think you could have sold it to a supervisor or at least talked him into a temporary clearance.

Tell him it's a weep hole :laughing:
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Conduits enter service sections all the time thru open bottoms.

Did he cite a code section?

I think you could have sold it to a supervisor or at least talked him into a temporary clearance.

Tell him it's a weep hole :laughing:
he called his super out that was supposedly the electrically knowlegable one. and he was even more of a ass. they want that reinspection fee
 

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This seems fairly stupid to me! On construction sites I've been on there are splitters against the bottom corner of walls where 2 of the 4 sides are nothing but the cement. Never been an issue.
 
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