Electrician Talk banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What does an estimator do and how do they get compensated? What's average pay for estimators in CA. The company I worked for just offered me this position, I'm making decent money in the field and I'm a little concern about making the transition into the office. Any suggestions? I'm 23 should I be more concern about getting more experience in the field or should I go for the opportunity?
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
415 Posts
From what little I know about contracting, it appears that the company is impressed with your talent and sees potential in you. All the successful contractors have top notch estimators. I'd consider taking the position.
Can't help you on the compensation question.
 

·
RIP 1959-2015
Joined
·
39,618 Posts
What does an estimator do and how do they get compensated? What's average pay for estimators in CA. The company I worked for just offered me this position, I'm making decent money in the field and I'm a little concern about making the transition into the office. Any suggestions? I'm 23 should I be more concern about getting more experience in the field or should I go for the opportunity?
Take the job and learn all that you can about it then you'll really have an upper hand if you ever go out on your own.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
290 Posts
Congrats on the offer! I would say take them up on it. I have never heard of someone your age getting offered that position so your impressing someone. It would be a definite change from what your doing but if they want to train you it would great experience for you down the road. A couple estimators I met in the past were salary, made more anually them most made in the field.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,629 Posts
I tried it and was bored. Liked the pressure in the field. Thought some of the bidding process where I worked took to much time and was totally inaccurate. Was thirty six at the time. Probably got ten more aches and pains since and might have tried it again if given the same opportunity. Hind sight is 20/20. Lost some jobs since new p.m. Got in.kinda wished I stuck it out. Who knows. Opportunity knocks. Just wish it wasn't such a guess. RFI ing the engineers puts everyone bidding to the same advantage. You just try to do the best with what you can. Hope this helps. Probably better benefits being company. I work union, so many times I am getting better pay than pm.no bonus though. Ask about gain share, and bonus.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
144 Posts
How you go on this is kind of dependent on how close to licensure you are, and your long term goals. If you're close to licensure you might want to get your ticket punched first.

As an estimator you calculate the materials required to perform a job, and how many man and equipment hours it will take to install those components. That gives you the bare cost, and then you add overhead and profit onto that determine the estimate or bid price for the project. The estimator makes or breaks the company. They get it right the company makes money and grows. They get it wrong and the company dies.

Pay varies by company, and the estimator's skill. As the junior you would probably be on a salary. It will probably be about ten or fifteen percent above what you are making with your bags on. But long hours when you are getting ready to put in a bid are the norm, plan on a fifty plus hour week. As you learn and start bidding jobs on your own the pay gets better. Best case scenario: You get to the point where you get salary, plus a percentage of profit on the jobs you bid, and/or a part of the company.

Top notch estimators are critical to a companies success. They can almost always call the hall and get journeymen, and masters. Top notch estimators are rare.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
MWayne said:
From what little I know about contracting, it appears that the company is impressed with your talent and sees potential in you. All the successful contractors have top notch estimators. I'd consider taking the position. Can't help you on the compensation question.
My old man taught me to always wear my tool bag and when given a task not to have a plan but a purpose. I decided to go for it, hopefully I can acquire good skills.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,221 Posts
As a younger guy, I would prefer to build skills with my ass in the field.. as an older guy, I would prefer to build skills with my ass in a chair.

If you take it and it winds up really being your cup of tea, speak up and get out of it as soon as you can. They could be picking you because you're the best (they have) for the position, but the position may not be the best for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
906 Posts
I agree they see something in you that would make a good estimator.
It's not for everyone, but for me, it gave me a long career. My skills made me high in demand, and every new job was a big advance in pay.
My last job lasted 18 years as Chief Estimator at a large Dallas commercial firm.
I was one of the highest paid salaried employees....plus bonus!
Estimating is a science these days. It takes years to learn.
I say if you have an opportunity to learn estimating, especially under the guidance of a senior estimator....go for it.
In 20 years your back and knees will thank you.......Good luck
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top