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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been asked to run a panel to a shed for someone to run two kilns one is 45 amps and one is 40 amps a total of 85 amps and they also want to run just a few lights and a TV. I was thinking a 100 amp sub panel would be OK but something is telling me that that the kiln circuits have to be rated for a continuous load.
 

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We did some for a local school last summer and they were figured continuous. Depending on the size of the pottery they were baking, they said they would run constantly anywhere from 7-14 hours....fwiw.
 

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I've done a couple kiln installs for some universities and most of the time the manuals say the min/max overcurrent device as well as the min size conductors. Not sure if Art. 422 in the code would address kilns specifically, might be worth a look.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
They used to run both kilns on a 100 amp service at their previous home so I am thinking to make an affordable install we can run a 90 amp sub panel out there and say good enough. If I step up to 100 amps I would need to go to #1 wire and nobody around here carries it. All the supply houses say that everyone is still using #2 for 100 amp sub panels.
 

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They used to run both kilns on a 100 amp service at their previous home so I am thinking to make an affordable install we can run a 90 amp sub panel out there and say good enough. If I step up to 100 amps I would need to go to #1 wire and nobody around here carries it. All the supply houses say that everyone is still using #2 for 100 amp sub panels.

#2 is only good for dwelling diversity. Often it works for sub panels even though its not code compliant since they rarely go over 1/2 the rating. If this ever went close to 100 I would think the wire would get really hot if covered by insulation without anything tripping. That and the fact the dwelling column is practically based on the 90*C table while the breaker is only good for 75*C.
 

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#2 is only good for dwelling diversity. Often it works for sub panels even though its not code compliant since they rarely go over 1/2 the rating. If this ever went close to 100 I would think the wire would get really hot if covered by insulation without anything tripping. That and the fact the dwelling column is practically based on the 90*C table while the breaker is only good for 75*C.
am i in the wrong table? my book says good 115 at 75, for #3
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
correction, #2
#2 AL

I can't imagine what their old 100 amp service looked like trying to run these things. They had their whole house and the two kilns running along with everything in the house and they were using what looks like one on a dryer receptacle and one on a range receptacle with just larger breakers.

Sounds like they were in an apartment and just did whatever they felt like doing.
 

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#2 AL

I can't imagine what their old 100 amp service looked like trying to run these things. They had their whole house and the two kilns running along with everything in the house and they were using what looks like one on a dryer receptacle and one on a range receptacle with just larger breakers.

Sounds like they were in an apartment and just did whatever they felt like doing.
yeah probably started smelling that burning tire smell and said time to leave:laughing::laughing::laughing:

any how put them on a 125 amp rated panel with the correct sized conductors.
my old master always said:
its cheaper to be on the safe side than to have to pay for the aftermath of cutting corners
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Yeah going to price out a 125 amp panel with 1/0 wire and see if I get it. Building about 100' from the house and have to run about 50' of SER to get out of the house and switch to URD in conduit to the building. I am thinking about $1,600 and about a days worth of work maybe two.
 

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rrolleston said:
Yeah going to price out a 125 amp panel with 1/0 wire and see if I get it. Building about 100' from the house and have to run about 50' of SER to get out of the house and switch to URD in conduit to the building. I am thinking about $1,600 and about a days worth of work maybe two.
Is the conduit run already in place? $1600 seems quite generous on your part if not, just thinking of trencher rental and the time it'll take. I'm asking because I'm just a gubbamint maintenance electrician and don't know pricing. Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Trenching will be done by him at a later time. I am going to just run the conduit across the lawn until spring use leave extra wire at the garage when it thaws he will pay me to extend the conduit and lay it in the trench and reconnect.
 

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Trenching will be done by him at a later time. I am going to just run the conduit across the lawn until spring use leave extra wire at the garage when it thaws he will pay me to extend the conduit and lay it in the trench and reconnect.

Sounds like an overhead service drop will be cheaper and easier.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Sounds like an overhead service drop will be cheaper and easier.
It homeowner don't mind taking responsibility for the digging I don't mind working with them. I would go overhead but the cost of setting up a mast weatherhead and splicing the wires costs a decent amount too.
 

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Trenching will be done by him at a later time. I am going to just run the conduit across the lawn until spring use leave extra wire at the garage when it thaws he will pay me to extend the conduit and lay it in the trench and reconnect.

That has to be the oddest job proposals I read on this cartoon page.
 
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