Electrician Talk banner

1 - 20 of 32 Posts

·
Petulant Moderator
Estwing magic
Joined
·
24,833 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
A French study has concluded that “high output” (whatever that means) LED lighting can cause retinal damage over a prolonged period of time. The issue seems to be at the blue part of the spectrum. The yellow part doesn’t appear to be a concern.

It might be something to carry around in your bag of information when discussing colour temperature with customers, especially if you’re dealing with health freaks.
 

·
Senile Member
I make all the electrons line up for their Flu shots
Joined
·
32,175 Posts
All I know about the subject is if I sit here too long in front of this stupid led laptop screen watching Ben Gravy surf video's then all the speed and other warning sign's on the streets are real blurry when I get my ass off the couch and start driving.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,961 Posts
My 8-year-old is terrified of blue light.


Which is a problem because the major component of the lighting for my 225 gallon SPS coral growing tank is ~420nm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,294 Posts
Could you link that for us.
90% of our airfield is LED and friggin bright.


Tim.
 

·
Super Moderator
Pres., GPS Timers
Joined
·
6,336 Posts
Here's a Harvard article on blue light.

They don't mention physical harm so much as the body's physiological response to thinking it's daytime due to the spectrum of the artificial light.

I've found that if at sunset I turn off all indoor lights, it gets my body accustomed to knowing it's night time and not being wide awake at 11:30 when going to bed.

https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/blue-light-has-a-dark-side
 

·
Super Moderator
Pres., GPS Timers
Joined
·
6,336 Posts
Tim:

Is your airfield lighting actually Blue LED or white LED with blue lenses on the fixtures?
 

·
Super Moderator
Pres., GPS Timers
Joined
·
6,336 Posts
Yeah, research sponsored by the Incandescent Lighting Council:vs_laugh:
Is it? I haven't read it yet. I just came across it when searching for the article above it.

My first thought was that LED lights are in urban areas which is where all the vehicle and industrial exhaust is. Kind of like saying salt in water results in shark bites. It's not the salt that does it, it's the shark.
 

·
Petulant Moderator
Estwing magic
Joined
·
24,833 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
I’m not saying I agree with the study. No doubt another study will come out with something different. Information is always good to have when talking with people, though. Sometimes “Umm, duh, erm, I dunno” doesn’t work too well.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
4,673 Posts
Is it? I haven't read it yet. I just came across it when searching for the article above it.

My first thought was that LED lights are in urban areas which is where all the vehicle and industrial exhaust is. Kind of like saying salt in water results in shark bites. It's not the salt that does it, it's the shark.
I was just being silly. But I don't trust studies by the "Trust us, we're scientists!" crowd anymore.
 

·
Modérateur
Joined
·
8,693 Posts
Tim:

Is your airfield lighting actually Blue LED or white LED with blue lenses on the fixtures?
I know my airport area do have mixed bag of Blue Led and white led with blue lenes but the lens verison is not too bad afaik .,, but straight bleu led yes they are strong light strength.

Majorty of the time the bleu lights are at med setting ( same instensty as taxiway ) the only time it come on full blast is during pretty good amount of rain then yes it will crank it up but have to be aware of glare.

And the other factor will play is FAA or other avation regulations reguarding of luminaires on airports so they are pretty specific on the type and brightness.

for non taxiway / runways area we have to use super sharp cutoff luminaires to keep the glare down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,961 Posts
My 8 year old is going to love this thread, he is months ahead of you guys on the blue LED are death subject. I’ll let him post his opinion if he chooses to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,218 Posts
I’m not saying I agree with the study. No doubt another study will come out with something different. Information is always good to have when talking with people, though. Sometimes “Umm, duh, erm, I dunno” doesn’t work too well.
Yeah, but sometimes Umm, duh, erm, I dunno, can get yer ass out of a pinch point that too much information got it into.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 99cents

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,294 Posts
The RWY and approaches are White, taxi edge lights are Blue, taxi centerline are Green, entrance to an apron and RWY guard lights are Amber, stop bars are Red. The lenses are colored but the LEDs are also the same color as the lens, not interchangeable.
Brightness setting are B1-B5, B-1 is basically dim and B-5 will cut through fog and snow.


Tim.


Tim.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
If blue light is a health problem, I fear we ought not go out in the day, at least when the skies are clear.

There's two main issues here: (1) does blue light damage the human eye? and (2) can exposure to blue light in the evening interfere with sleep?

The answer to (1) is no unless it is at blinding intensities. If you dig into the science (you can read an expert who did the digging here) the studies of concern turn out to have involved blinding monkeys with blue lasers.

The answer to (2) is well, we're still looking into it. My opinion is that it probably has some effect, but does not usually cause disabling sleep disorders. It is true that the cells in the retina the regulate pupil size and affect sleep rhythms, which have the jaw-cracking name of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) are most sensitive in the blues and violets. Problem is, other things influence the circadian cycle, and people whose circadian cycle is not affected by light still sleep. If blue light in the evening caused disabling sleep disorders, how could people live in the far north?
 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
Top