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I'm not sure if this is the right topic for this but I'm a second year apprentice and I've recently been thrown onto some solo piping projects, 3/4" and 1" runs down a corridor, placing boxes outside the suites and piping the pipes stubbing out of the suites into said boxes. I've been doing pretty good so far I think but there's a few things I keep having problems with.

http://imgur.com/a/hbK6z

One is determining what angle to kick a 90 degree bend (First picture). I can usually figure roughly what it is but it's mostly guess work I'd like to cut down on, plus if I'm guessing that means I have to cut it and squeeze it up in the ceiling to be able to see if it works or not.

The other (second picture) is when I come up to pre installed run of offsets that I want to match, how can I know what angle and distance the offsets were bent at so when I add my pipe it will look nice and parallel next to them?

I've drawn the pipe I'm installing in red.

The measurements are not actual, I couldn't remember what they were, just arbitrary easyish numbers to use.
 

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Every apprentice should have this book in their back pocket:

http://ecmweb.com/benfield-conduit-bending-manual
...compared to the bending apps available today , that book is one of the worst bending books I've ever put my hands on. Bending apps show how to place bender on conduit (which direction the head faces) , which may seem minimal to you or myself, but to someone teaching themselves how to bend conduit it means a world of difference. JMO
 

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Treat your kick just like an offset.

With an offset you know you want the end of the pipe to rise by a certain number of inches, just like your kick.

Put your 90 against a wall and measure from the wall [backside of your 90] to where you want to put your offset bend.

After you bend it, put a level on your 90 and measure how far it rises off the floor to be sure you have the correct offset before hauling it into the ceiling.
 

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I'm not sure if this is the right topic for this but I'm a second year apprentice and I've recently been thrown onto some solo piping projects, 3/4" and 1" runs down a corridor, placing boxes outside the suites and piping the pipes stubbing out of the suites into said boxes. I've been doing pretty good so far I think but there's a few things I keep having problems with.

http://imgur.com/a/hbK6z

One is determining what angle to kick a 90 degree bend (First picture). I can usually figure roughly what it is but it's mostly guess work I'd like to cut down on, plus if I'm guessing that means I have to cut it and squeeze it up in the ceiling to be able to see if it works or not.

The other (second picture) is when I come up to pre installed run of offsets that I want to match, how can I know what angle and distance the offsets were bent at so when I add my pipe it will look nice and parallel next to them?

I've drawn the pipe I'm installing in red.

The measurements are not actual, I couldn't remember what they were, just arbitrary easyish numbers to use.
I've never seen anyone learn successfully from a book or an app.

My tips to one and all:

1) You must have a traditional folding ruler. It's funny, but most NECA employers expect their IBEW troopers to have one. It's with this device that one can easily determine what angle of bend you're dealing with.


Courtesy IBEW.

2) I, myself always bring my laser to my jobs. I pull the location of the edge of the j-box// pull can down to the floor -- and mark it in pencil.

The first time out, you'll be clumsy and slow. The payoff is immense. For you pull ALL of the terminal locations down to the floor. Suddenly, EVERY other measurement becomes a snap.

Starting with how much distance is required for the quarter-turn bend into the box.

3) I'm SO LAZY that I purchased a Hilti PD-10. ( Yes, this dates me. )

This means that I can pull distances down to the floor half the time.

Since it's a pretty good bet that you'll never lay your hands on one, I'll skip the technique... quick and lazy that it is.

&&&&&&&

In this instance, I'd bend the 90 and then eyeball the kick, and then trim the EMT.

The parallels would be performed per the IBEW trick in the video.
 

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For a kick you use the same multiplier used for an offset. Say you want a 3 inch kick, measure from BACK of 90 6" and bend a 30* @ center of bend. Works very well when doing rmc.
 

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Old Grumpy Bastard
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...compared to the bending apps available today , that book is one of the worst bending books I've ever put my hands on. Bending apps show how to place bender on conduit (which direction the head faces) , which may seem minimal to you or myself, but to someone teaching themselves how to bend conduit it means a world of difference. JMO
So on a day the kid leaves his phone home or loses it he's not a conduit bender.
 

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I love my phone app. I've been using less conventional degrees for offsets when it suits me to make pulls easier and skipping unnecessary pull points.

I could get a multiplier chart, but it's still a cheat sheet.

A digital level is great with less conventional bends. Especially for large conduit or exposed work.
 

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Today I somewhat match the offset of a 1.5" rigid conduit. First I found its centers. Then I used my digital level to find out exactly what degree the bends were.

10* on both bends give 1/10 of a degree or 2, BUT the conduit was not plumb, and was forced to lean towards the vertical support which I was not interested in matching.

My first (oversized) hole was already made and unfortunately it was done on center of the larger conduit, NOT on the same plane so the offsets couldn't be exactly the same. 10* and a larger offset lengthened my distance between bends way too far. So I pulled out my phone app and adjusted the angle so the center to center distance was about the same, which gave me 13*.

Bent both my 3/4" rigid with my digital level going 2.5* over to comp for spring back, no tweaking and tossed them up. They look pretty good and didn't take much time.
 

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When I come into this situation I will measure to centre of the bends and than put my marks on the centre mark of the bender. Eyeball the degrees and then tweak them to get it perfect.
 

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Old Grumpy Bastard
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A Nice idea to simplify bending for a newbie and once you get use to it it should speed up bending, but a TERRIBLE video, dump the broad and get an electrician to actually bend the conduit. The marketing guy should be fired.
Sex sells for the young guys running on hormones. They'll buy it and learn how to use it one day when it's slow.
 
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Old Grumpy Bastard
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I learned on my own and.... I didn't learn much. I will be buying this. lol
It would be impressive if she actually bent the pipe.




Oh and if she had a fuller shirt....just saying...
 
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I do it same way I do offsets. I neasure how much kick I need how much room to do it in and try to choose an angle that is the smallest one that fits plus allowing to increase or decrease the kick amount while using same start point for multiple bends. The multipliers for offsets work for kicks too. For example 6" kick can be done with measuring fropm back of 90 12" and pulling 30 degrees. Just keep in mind the larger your pipe the smaller degree of bend you will have to use due to the radius. I had a no dog 6 " level made specifically for pipe it has 5, 10, 15, and 30 degrees along with plumb it includes the multipliers on the level. or there are the multiple apps available.
 
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