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Thanks for the clarification. So it is just for the possibility of future upgrades, there are no safety issues attached to the idea, unless we consider the fact that it would help prevent handyman hacks from using the ground as a neutral for occ. sensors and such.
The reason that the NEC requires the grounded conductor at the switch boxes was a safety issue. UL had listed products, such as occupancy sensing switches, that used the Equipment Grounding Conductor as the grounded conductor. The standard permitted up to 0.5mA of current per device on the EGC. This puts current on a conductor that is only intended to carry fault current and is a shock hazard, just like an open neutral, if some one opens the spliced EGCs.

UL told the NFPA that if the NEC would require the neutral in the switch boxes, they would change the standard and prohibit the use of the EGC as a neutral.
 

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There are a couple minor code violations I see in the picture, that I'm sure have been talked to death at this site, but not having a neutral is not yet one of them here in Canada! ;)

Borgi
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Interesting. I only see one. What am I possibly missing?
something to do with the two wires running through the sides of the box? are those holding it in place? the box did seem too move a bit too much when i was screwing the switch in.
 

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something to do with the two wires running through the sides of the box? are those holding it in place? the box did seem too move a bit too much when i was screwing the switch in.

Those are nails....usually 3.5" common nails....driven through the box into the stud. Perfectly acceptable and it was very common especially before cordless drills were around for driving screws.

Only violation I see is the box is not out far enough......even that is a stretch of the imagination. Hard to be sure with that picture.

12-3016 Flush boxes, cabinets, and fittings


(1) The front edges of boxes, cabinets, and fittings installed in walls or ceilings shall not be set in more than
6 mm from the finished surface and, where the walls or ceilings are of wood or other combustible material,
shall be flush with the finished surface or shall project from the surface.


 

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Hard to see, but If my eyes aren't deceiving me, that's Romex. And if so, it doesn't look like the ground is bonded to the box with an approved grounding screw.
 

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I heard it was code, I heard it wasn't. Still not sure.

But I never bring a neutral to my dead ends..

Yet again I am kind of a hack. So what do I know.

It is a requirement yes. However, the exceptions to the requirement make it so you hardly ever a need to do it.
 

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IBEW L.U. 1852
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Hard to see, but If my eyes aren't deceiving me, that's Romex. And if so, it doesn't look like the ground is bonded to the box with an approved grounding screw.
Its what we call Loomex (spelling??) here in Canada......same thing as Romex. Its actually NMD-90 is the proper code designation for us. I'm pretty sure Loomex is a brand name.

The cable is definitely bonded properly and those are the proper ground screws that would have been in that box from the factory. CSA approved.
 
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Its what we call Loomex (spelling??) here in Canada......same thing as Romex. Its actually NMD-90 is the proper code designation for us. I'm pretty sure Loomex is a brand name.

The cable is definitely bonded properly and those are the proper ground screws that would have been in that box from the factory. CSA approved.

Ugh. Just when I think I start to understand Canada.

You guys are so weird with your Loomex and 347v boxes.
 

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The picture makes it difficult to see exactly the distances involved, but no good inspector would call you on either.

The box looks to be set in too far. I dislike it when you mount the box properly and then the drywaller, or finisher, somehow makes the box look set in. I seen somewhere on line that you can buy boxes that are adjustable for this very reason. Can't remember where, or how much. ;)

The ground is around the screw ok, but I don't think there is six inches left there.

Like I said, minor issues that would never get called out. Just having some fun :)

Borgi
 

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The picture makes it difficult to see exactly the distances involved, but no good inspector would call you on either.

The box looks to be set in too far. I dislike it when you mount the box properly and then the drywaller, or finisher, somehow makes the box look set in. I seen somewhere on line that you can buy boxes that are adjustable for this very reason. Can't remember where, or how much. ;)

The ground is around the screw ok, but I don't think there is six inches left there.

Like I said, minor issues that would never get called out. Just having some fun :)

Borgi
If you're that concerned about the distance, just use gangable 1104's and screw them on from the inside. 6" of ground wire for a switch?
 

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If you're that concerned about the distance, just use gangable 1104's and screw them on from the inside. 6" of ground wire for a switch?
Actually, I would have no problem fixing the box in the picture as the nails are inside, but it's not set in enough for concern. If it was, I could also use a box extension. Depending on time. ;)

Yes, switch boxes included. The rule doesn't say otherwise, that I am aware of. Just says outlet box. Plus, as you are aware, newer switches have a ground screw on the switch itself.

I may be mistaken, if I am please enlighten me.

Borgi
 
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