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If an electrical control panel is built on site is it required to be listed/inspected? Also is it required to built to a certain standard other than CEC?
 

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check out this recent discussion
 

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really depends on what the customer wants
 

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I don't know about Canada. I asked the inspector once about it in passing and he scratched his head and figured if it was all listed components installed to code, he didn't have a problem with it. From researching it a little further I believe this to be generally accurate.
 

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I was told, IF you have 120v in the panel, then you need certification, otherwise said certification is not required
 

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Not if designed and signed off by an engineer.
 
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I asked a BC inspector this a few years ago. He said officially yes even a lighting contactor in a 6x6 requires a sticker. Unofficially they don't call it for site built panels of reasonable size (whatever the heck that means).
 

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If you get a yes/no answer to this, please let us know. My limited experience has been some inspectors want to see it and others will take your word on having used approved material. The common thread among inspectors is how much power is available? at what voltage? With inspectors, I've found it easier to ask permission than beg forgiveness...
 

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If your authority is willing to accept the assembly of approved equipment directly, you wouldn't need the full control panel approved. If they won't, then you do.

In some regions, you're allowed basic things directly, ie a basic enclosure with a maximum number of fuses or terminals, then other AHJs may a better understanding of control panels are are more willing to do it directly, then again others may not. Really can be quite varied.
Most times an inspector sees a power monitoring device in a panelboard they'll ask to get the new assembly approved (Special Inspection). But it ultimately depends on them.

If anyone has a clearer distinction i'd be happy to hear it.

If your site has a maintenance program, they should have some definition of what assembly will can be added without review, that's likely your best bet. In general though, i'd tell people if you think it's stupid easy and you're getting a permit anyway, let the AHJ tell you. The cost/time is often not too bad and you'd have to pay the majority of the costs anyway if you got it pre-inspected. In my experience, if your panel is making decisions internal to itself, ie deciding to actuate a relay or whatever, it likely needs to be approved as an equipment - less than that though... shrug.

Also, if it's class2 and the AHJ wants it approved - tell the AHJ it's class2, prove to him it's class2 and it doesn't involve anything safety related and ask him why. Most <30V things can be made class2 by design, and it would simplify so much of the extra-low voltage headaches people experience.
 
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