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IBEW L.U. 1852
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I've worked some long days in emergency situations. It sucks, but it happens. However, there is a huge difference between an emergency and a planned job. No way in hell would I work 16 hours on a planned job because the shop refuses to properly man the job. I would tell them to send more help. 10 hours, maybe 12 hours would be my limit. I don't care if the job gets done or not. If they can't man the jobs appropriately they shouldn't be taking them.
Well said sir. I wouldn't even dream of asking my crew to work 16 hours on a planned job.


FWIW....the longest I have done was 22 hrs for an emergency situation. Excavator hooked the main feeders for the hospital closest to me. The generator had to be refueled twice while we excavated, replaced the sections of damaged conduits, replaced the pad mount transformer and repulled and terminated it all. Brutal.
 

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My old employer would pull the same thing Harry's did but never at noon always about 30 mins. before we left for the day. I was always one of the last asked as they usually knew I would. But there were some times they counted on me and I made plans oh well.
But let me get it straight a 15 minute break uuuummm no! The shops I worked at we had two 15s and at least a 30 minute lunch on planned stuff. In emergency situations we would try to breaks as well. Also generally if we had to bust out an emergency they would generally spring for a nice dinner or something at a later date as a thank you.

I do think that they are taking advantage of you though and understaffing jobs like that with fast paced deadlines is a recipe for someone to be hurt or worse.
 

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Overtime is expected everyday here. You have to ask to get off on time :mad:
Was this made known when you took the job, or did it evolve over time from them not hiring enough manpower, etc.

The reason I ask is because some companies, like Brian John's for example, overtime is just a necessary way of life due to the unpredictability and often times emergency nature of the work they do. These companies usually make it known up front that overtime will be necessary often and it is expected that the employee be available to work it. I personally wouldn't take a job like this for that reason, but some guys love it.

On the other hand if you work for a standard electrical contractor and got hired with the expectation of working 40 hrs with maybe some occasional ot, and now find yourself working ot consistently due to their lack of manpower, I would be pretty pissed off about that and would definitely be looking for a new job.
 

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RIP 1959-2015
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Well said sir. I wouldn't even dream of asking my crew to work 16 hours on a planned job.


FWIW....the longest I have done was 22 hrs for an emergency situation. Excavator hooked the main feeders for the hospital closest to me. The generator had to be refueled twice while we excavated, replaced the sections of damaged conduits, replaced the pad mount transformer and repulled and terminated it all. Brutal.
He would do it at noon on Friday and if you did not call in the PM would magically forget your pay check at the shop, otherwise he would bring them out to all the ongoing jobs, so then you would have to make it to the shop in time to get your check otherwise you would have to wait till Monday after work and again you would have to get to the shop in time.

There was no direct deposit back in those days and if you did not pick up your check by Monday he would put them in the snail mail and they would never show up until Friday....Whata prick.....:no::laughing:
 

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Was this made known when you took the job, or did it evolve over time from them not hiring enough manpower, etc.

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Job description was worded "occasional overtime required"

I hired on when there was a building boom going on. My crew was 12 guys and then the company went on a hiring spree making the crew size 35 guys. So initially the company kept up on the manpower. Over the last 15 years my crew went from 35 guys to 6. 2 of us retired 2 years ago and the company never replaced us. Last I heard, my old crew was absorbed into another crew for a total of 10 guys.

The only saving grace all those years was a clause in our contract stating "Mandatory Overtime for January thru May, September thru December maxed at 12 hours. June, July, August maxed at 15 hours". After those hours, OT was voluntary. Later contracts lower the mandatory hours to 9 and 12 respectively.
 

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I come from the industrial world, lots of shut downs and turn arounds, many many many 12 plus hour jobs. I worked for a company for two years that was 7 12s with scattered overtime. Longest I ever worked was 32 hrs straight starting up a dog food plant. Ugh, those were the days.
 

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I come from the industrial world, lots of shut downs and turn arounds, many many many 12 plus hour jobs. I worked for a company for two years that was 7 12s with scattered overtime. Longest I ever worked was 32 hrs straight starting up a dog food plant. Ugh, those were the days.
I can't see any benefit to working hours like that. An emergency or an occasional shutdown is one thing. But for 2 years? At some point having a life outside of work is more important than money.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
The main problem as I see it. The entire shift can be cut down by adding labor.
I've been on some long ass shifts, during emergency situations. Not by design.
I've already made it known at 16 hours I'm leaving weather the job is done or not. They could plan a relief shift, or break it up into 2 days.
Because the company we work for wants it done in one day, does not make it my problem.
And I will add if I were to be terminated for leaving I would have a new job within 2 days. But I doubt that will happen.
 

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Yeah, lots of companies have finally started implementing policies, realizing nothing gets done after 12 hours. And your right, social life is affected. Money isn't everything, I did it because back then, I was job scared, I thought if I didn't do it, another guy would. Let me tell you, after seeing a few fatalities over the years, my thoughts on work vs home, totally different
 

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Long shifts are pretty common for us during shutdowns and change overs, but I make sure we take proper breaks to wind down and keep our heads straight. It's just not safe nor productive to go go go all the time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
In "this particular case" the work is scheduled way in advanced. They decision is made to limit man power and make us work insane amount of hours. This is not a shutdown. This is not an emergency.
But when they arrive in the morning they want to bring the store on line and start to open as soon as possible.
Yet they refuse us asking for additional man power...
I have made it known I'm out after 16. Schedule more guys or a relief shift. I don't get anything but a paycheck after its all said and done.
And a huge pain in the ass during.
I would equate it to working for a house flipper.
 

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I often work 12-16 hour days, depending on how many things have blown up that week. I always expect to work late, and if I am home by 4pm, then I am happy. I have had a few days, where I have worked in excess of 27 hours. In those hours, several breaks were taken, and plenty of water is consumed. It is a mind game, and I love staying focused for that long. There is something about that feeling of accomplishment after a long shift sometimes, that I really enjoy. Yes I am crazy, and have only done it a few times, but they know I am capable of getting things done. The most important thing to remember when working long hours, is to pay attention, and have a good team who looks out for each other.
 

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We routinely work 10-12 hour days and have in an emergency worked longer. What i tell my crew is that if they work anything more than 13 that i don't want them back in without 8 hours rest. Not including the drive home. My manager has, in the past worked the crew 16 hrs and wanted them back to the site 4 hours later, and most of them live 30-45 minutes away.


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