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Hello everyone, I'm looking for a bit of guidance for some more senior electricians who have been in the industry for a while.

So a little about me I'm 31 and just started my apprenticeship. I did a 6 month pre-apprenticeship program and have been working for a large electrical company that mainly does large high rise residential jobs for the last 8 months.

The reason I got into the trade was I needed a change from working kitchen jobs which i was doing for over 15 years. I did enjoy cooking I just thought electrical would be a bit more stable and lead to financial security.

But so far I'm really not enjoying the work, and although I did reasonably well in my first year of school I found the math very difficult and frustrating.

And so far I'm not really enjoying the work, I have a condition called ankylosing spondilitis which is a form of arthritis and raynaulds which is a circulatory condition that causes my extremities to get really cold easily so in the winter and early spring/late fall working on the rough in crew my hands were going numb sometimes making it difficult to work. And doing some of the manual labor work is kinda hard on my body.

I'm also color blind. I have a hard time distinguishing the colors of some of the wires. Obviously red/blue/black/white not problem. But when it different wire companies are making different shades of colors and you have multiple colors in a box or pannel It can become difficult. Brown and red sometimes look very similar to me. Or the dark greens mess me up a bit too.

I basically got into this trade because I figured it would be a means to an end and I could one day get a well paying job that's not going to break my back and I can save money and afford my hobbies and possibly support a family one day. But I'm kinda worried that if I'm having such a hard time now it will be just as much of a struggle 10 years down the road.

Do you guys think the colorblindness thing screws me over in the long run? And the arthritis is under control with a wonderful medication but all the labor jobs and lifting seems to aggravate it from time. And with the circulation problem are there jobs I can get where I'm not exposed to the elements? or are most jobs going to be partially exposed to the weather?

All of this stuff has been weighing on my mind for a while now and I'm having thoughts of going back to kitchen work or taking something a bit more up my alley in school possibly. I would really appreciate any advice though.
 

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Depends what you're doing, it could be fun/interesting or it could suck. If you can see yourself enjoying the trade stay, if not quit :thumbsup:
 

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I learned a long time ago that following the money doesn't always equal a good or enjoyable job.

You should find what your interests are and apply your learning to that.

I've heard it said "find something you like to do and you will never have to work a day in your life"

If you like the electrical trade, there may be some part of it that fits you. But with your impairments, general construction/grunt work may not be for you. The color blindness doesn't help either.

Something like PLC programming may work for you.
 

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If I were you I'd move on. Why do something that you don't enjoy? Life is short and it moves fast, no point not enjoying every second of it. I do electrical work cause I love it, it's like being paid to play baseball for me. Only much less money and women.
 

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Hello everyone, I'm looking for a bit of guidance for some more senior electricians who have been in the industry for a while.

So a little about me I'm 31 and just started my apprenticeship. I did a 6 month pre-apprenticeship program and have been working for a large electrical company that mainly does large high rise residential jobs for the last 8 months.

The reason I got into the trade was I needed a change from working kitchen jobs which i was doing for over 15 years. I did enjoy cooking I just thought electrical would be a bit more stable and lead to financial security.

But so far I'm really not enjoying the work, and although I did reasonably well in my first year of school I found the math very difficult and frustrating.

And so far I'm not really enjoying the work, I have a condition called ankylosing spondilitis which is a form of arthritis and raynaulds which is a circulatory condition that causes my extremities to get really cold easily so in the winter and early spring/late fall working on the rough in crew my hands were going numb sometimes making it difficult to work. And doing some of the manual labor work is kinda hard on my body.

I'm also color blind. I have a hard time distinguishing the colors of some of the wires. Obviously red/blue/black/white not problem. But when it different wire companies are making different shades of colors and you have multiple colors in a box or pannel It can become difficult. Brown and red sometimes look very similar to me. Or the dark greens mess me up a bit too.

I basically got into this trade because I figured it would be a means to an end and I could one day get a well paying job that's not going to break my back and I can save money and afford my hobbies and possibly support a family one day. But I'm kinda worried that if I'm having such a hard time now it will be just as much of a struggle 10 years down the road.

Do you guys think the colorblindness thing screws me over in the long run? And the arthritis is under control with a wonderful medication but all the labor jobs and lifting seems to aggravate it from time. And with the circulation problem are there jobs I can get where I'm not exposed to the elements? or are most jobs going to be partially exposed to the weather?

All of this stuff has been weighing on my mind for a while now and I'm having thoughts of going back to kitchen work or taking something a bit more up my alley in school possibly. I would really appreciate any advice though.
tldr.
 

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If you think it sucks now, it only gets worse. I don't mind my job, it was never a dream of mine to be an electrician, but working in kitchens and other jobs, more than 2 at a time, just go make enough $ was getting old quick. I liked working with my hands, weeded out the trades I didn't want to do FOREVER and came up with electrical. It pays the bills, some jobs are alright, some jobs are nice, and some days just plain suck. I believe it's not about a job you'll love, but a job that you don't hate. I'm not one who lives to work, I work to live. HVAC work may be a trade you want to consider.
 

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Hello everyone, I'm looking for a bit of guidance for some more senior electricians who have been in the industry for a while.

So a little about me I'm 31 and just started my apprenticeship. I did a 6 month pre-apprenticeship program and have been working for a large electrical company that mainly does large high rise residential jobs for the last 8 months.

The reason I got into the trade was I needed a change from working kitchen jobs which i was doing for over 15 years. I did enjoy cooking I just thought electrical would be a bit more stable and lead to financial security.

But so far I'm really not enjoying the work, and although I did reasonably well in my first year of school I found the math very difficult and frustrating.

And so far I'm not really enjoying the work, I have a condition called ankylosing spondilitis which is a form of arthritis and raynaulds which is a circulatory condition that causes my extremities to get really cold easily so in the winter and early spring/late fall working on the rough in crew my hands were going numb sometimes making it difficult to work. And doing some of the manual labor work is kinda hard on my body.

I'm also color blind. I have a hard time distinguishing the colors of some of the wires. Obviously red/blue/black/white not problem. But when it different wire companies are making different shades of colors and you have multiple colors in a box or pannel It can become difficult. Brown and red sometimes look very similar to me. Or the dark greens mess me up a bit too.

I basically got into this trade because I figured it would be a means to an end and I could one day get a well paying job that's not going to break my back and I can save money and afford my hobbies and possibly support a family one day. But I'm kinda worried that if I'm having such a hard time now it will be just as much of a struggle 10 years down the road.

Do you guys think the colorblindness thing screws me over in the long run? And the arthritis is under control with a wonderful medication but all the labor jobs and lifting seems to aggravate it from time. And with the circulation problem are there jobs I can get where I'm not exposed to the elements? or are most jobs going to be partially exposed to the weather?

All of this stuff has been weighing on my mind for a while now and I'm having thoughts of going back to kitchen work or taking something a bit more up my alley in school possibly. I would really appreciate any advice though.
1. Bad reason to start any trade or job, you should have an interest in whatever job you look into.
2. Not really enjoying the work.. Well im not sure anyone "enjoys" work but I think we all enjoy our work, if not quit, thats goes for any job, lifes to short to be unhappy about something so easily changed.
3. Math can be learned
4. Again not enjoying the work...
5. Color blind, there is ways around these disabilities I.E label the wires..
6. another bad reason to choose a job
7. I dont see most disabilities (within reason for the smart @$$e$) as "crutches", I think they are commonly used as "crutches" but I think thats just a easily available excuse for applicable people, I have a buddy who is deaf (100% deaf since birth) and who has some kind of color blindness greens reds ect, he is offered a check from the govt, he never needs to work, he chooses to make no excuses for himself and has found ways to adapt and overcome to any disABILITY he's faced, no excuses.

My advice, find a new job.
 

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You said it yourself dude. You enjoy cooking. So go be the best cook you can possibly be. Let your position open back up for someone who wants it.
 

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Don't let the color blindness thing stop you. I was diagnosed at 17 years old as color blind and the only thing it has ever held me back from is becoming a painter.

Thank god for that:thumbsup:

I do find it pretty challenging when trying to terminate communication wires.:laughing:
 

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Hello everyone, I'm looking for a bit of guidance for some more senior electricians who have been in the industry for a while.

So a little about me I'm 31 and just started my apprenticeship. I did a 6 month pre-apprenticeship program and have been working for a large electrical company that mainly does large high rise residential jobs for the last 8 months.

The reason I got into the trade was I needed a change from working kitchen jobs which i was doing for over 15 years. I did enjoy cooking I just thought electrical would be a bit more stable and lead to financial security.

But so far I'm really not enjoying the work, and although I did reasonably well in my first year of school I found the math very difficult and frustrating.

And so far I'm not really enjoying the work, I have a condition called ankylosing spondilitis which is a form of arthritis and raynaulds which is a circulatory condition that causes my extremities to get really cold easily so in the winter and early spring/late fall working on the rough in crew my hands were going numb sometimes making it difficult to work. And doing some of the manual labor work is kinda hard on my body.

I'm also color blind. I have a hard time distinguishing the colors of some of the wires. Obviously red/blue/black/white not problem. But when it different wire companies are making different shades of colors and you have multiple colors in a box or pannel It can become difficult. Brown and red sometimes look very similar to me. Or the dark greens mess me up a bit too.

I basically got into this trade because I figured it would be a means to an end and I could one day get a well paying job that's not going to break my back and I can save money and afford my hobbies and possibly support a family one day. But I'm kinda worried that if I'm having such a hard time now it will be just as much of a struggle 10 years down the road.

Do you guys think the colorblindness thing screws me over in the long run? And the arthritis is under control with a wonderful medication but all the labor jobs and lifting seems to aggravate it from time. And with the circulation problem are there jobs I can get where I'm not exposed to the elements? or are most jobs going to be partially exposed to the weather?

All of this stuff has been weighing on my mind for a while now and I'm having thoughts of going back to kitchen work or taking something a bit more up my alley in school possibly. I would really appreciate any advice though.
Are you fu|<|<ing serious? You are gonna break your back everyday. If you cannot see colors you are at risk everyday, and a danger to others on your crew. It is vital to be able to see the difference in caution and danger tape. Construction is a boom bust cycle. No security and the money you make today will get you thru unemployment tomorrow till you find another job. My advice is play to your strengths. Everyone has to eat. Your good in a kitchen, perhaps chef is for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Hey thanks for all the advice guys. I'm going to tough it out for a little while longer and do some volunteer work in some fields that I might enjoy and see if that leads anywhere.

I Don't hate my job.. just some days are harder than others.. and I'm not looking for a shoulder to cry on or anything but I have been struggling with depression for a long time now and for the last few months have be particularly difficult and I lost a lot of confidence. So I think that has a little bit to do with me being so unhappy at work as well.

But to be honest does the bending and lifting and labor eventually get easier as your years in the trade go on? like does your workload get a bit lighter or do you find you are still busting your ass hauling stuff around all day like when you were first/2nd year apprentice?

Phatstax my color blindness isn't that bad where I cant distinguish between yellow and red caution tape. It's only come up twice where I couldn't tell between 2 wires. And I just had to ask someone. The last time was with a red and brown.
 

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The workload gets easier, but the body gets worse.. so it's basically the same.

Don't give up just for the heck of it, give up when you have a much better dream to chase. Work sucks, but finish your apprenticeship and maybe along the way you'll figure out a place in the career that you really enjoy. If not, then go try something else at least you'll always have your ticket.. and it's never too late to start something new.
 

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Hey thanks for all the advice guys. I'm going to tough it out for a little while longer and do some volunteer work in some fields that I might enjoy and see if that leads anywhere.

I Don't hate my job.. just some days are harder than others.. and I'm not looking for a shoulder to cry on or anything but I have been struggling with depression for a long time now and for the last few months have be particularly difficult and I lost a lot of confidence. So I think that has a little bit to do with me being so unhappy at work as well.

But to be honest does the bending and lifting and labor eventually get easier as your years in the trade go on? like does your workload get a bit lighter or do you find you are still busting your ass hauling stuff around all day like when you were first/2nd year apprentice?

Phatstax my color blindness isn't that bad where I cant distinguish between yellow and red caution tape. It's only come up twice where I couldn't tell between 2 wires. And I just had to ask someone. The last time was with a red and brown.
Welcome to the forum:thumbsup:

Working as an apprentice is the hardest work you'll do in your career, when you get to the point of being licensed you will not be given all the chit jobs because you'll be needed for what you know at that point, work hard, study even harder, take up a good exercise program, hulk your self up a little bit that will make your job easier too and build your confidence in yourself, everyone here has a list of aliments that are a struggle each day, so you're not alone, every day we all fail at something, but we all look at as a learning experience, a challenge, life would be very boring if there were no challenges to overcome.

Depression is one hell of a challenge, that we must all overcome, the world we live in is very ugly in most places, a good example is being born in a place like Iran where unthinkable human suffering is the norm, so when you look at it that way, we've got it dam good in this neck of the woods, so we all rise in the morning and go to work and earn a good living when the work day is done we can go out and play or do whatever we want to do.

Depression is one hell of a challenge,,,,Fight it off every day and don't let anyone tell you, you can't------Look into "Motors , controls and PLC's master that and you will be in demand for the rest of your career.

Good luck and remember, beat the challenge every day, and smile you're on candid camera...:laughing:
 

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Don't let the color blindness thing stop you. I was diagnosed at 17 years old as color blind and the only thing it has ever held me back from is becoming a painter.

Thank god for that:thumbsup:

I do find it pretty challenging when trying to terminate communication wires.:laughing:
Good man:thumbsup:
 

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Given your 1st post, I cannot reccommend that you continue in the trade unless you go into controls or plc i.e. Industrial work. If you are having a problem with the math, then I am sorry to tell you that you will have an even harder time with industrial as you will have to do more math.

I don't really see that given all the things you said, that the electrical field is for you. You don't love it, it is just a job. That type of work will kill your spirit in the end. The arthritis will become more and more of a problem as you squeeze pliers and bend conduit, pull wire.

You need to go read the book called ......... hold on..... 48 days to the work you love. By Dan Miller.

Sorry about that HUGE link, it was done automatically.
I am sorry to hear about the depression, It is a terrible thing to have. Your biggest job now, will be to fight that. Good luck with your decision. If you decide to remain in the trade I hope you will come to enjoy it as we do.

I had a hard time with the math when I was starting as an apprentice, but it gets easier as you come to familiarize yourself with the formula's and making them a habit.
 

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I agree with the others that you should do something else.

FYI As to the color blindness, I had a helper who was red/green blind (mostly), but (suprisingly) we were able to work around it (mostly). This was commercial retail and he was making up boxes in lighting runs, so there was no room for error (green +red = bang). He managed to find a particular LED flashlight that would allow him to see the difference in color. He didn't see red or green, but whatever he saw he was able to tell the difference.
 
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