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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Iam looking for a clamp meter for AC/DC current and AC/DC Voltage. Min voltage 1000v
Looking around maybe i can find a good price these days. Do you own any and you are happy with ?
 

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Install, troubleshoot, maintain, and upgrade electrical systems, plant utilities, PLC's, mechanical
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This is the one I use.
AC/DC amps
AC/DC volts
1000v class III
1000A
And all kinds of other functions that come in handy when dealing with AC/DC motors.


Remember your meter is a life insurance policy used to protect you from getting killed or maimed.
What is your life worth?
$200 for a meter is nothing.
A good meter, taken care of will last for years.

What ever you get, get a case for it.
When I see an electrician pull a meter out his bag with the leads tangled around other tools, I cringe.
IMO an electrician that doesn't take care of his meter is an accident waiting to happen.
 

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Power distribution and controls
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1000v or higher is going to be SPENDY! Next comes the safety rules for most places I have worked, do nothing hot.
You are dressing in a 40cal suit when doing these measurements?
 

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Chief Flunky
Field Service Engineer
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Just buy one of these.

B&K Precision HV44A High Voltage Probe Meter, 0 to +40KV DC B&K Precision HV44A High Voltage Probe Meter, 0 to +40KV DC: Test Probes: Amazon.com: Industrial & Scientific

It’s just a resistive divider that plugs into a standard multimeter with the “Fluke” spacing. Can buy versions that measure up to 28 kV to ground.

The Beiers PD25 and PD10 work the same way but with 2 probes on hot sticks and can go pretty high.

Above about 600 V puts you into “high” (utility) voltages.

Standard clamps/CTs work just fine. No such thing really as a bushing CT above 600 V. You just test on insulated cables. Shunts for DC.

This is all standard practice stuff. Don’t try doing “high voltage” unless you understand and have experience abc training with it. There are a lot of things that are very different from low voltage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
@Paul
I have this fluke detector and some other hv probes somewhere in the store.I used it in my younger days when i was expirament with some projects.
@SWD No suit just a short and crocs shoes for safety (j/k)
What i need the meter right now is for Pv measurements. I don't think I will exceed the 1000v DC mark often but it can be done by a mistake.
This looks like a small beast...so his price.It can mesure up to 1500v 393 FC Solar Clamp Meter CAT III 1500 V
 

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Chief Flunky
Field Service Engineer
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@Paul
I have this fluke detector and some other hv probes somewhere in the store.I used it in my younger days when i was expirament with some projects.
@SWD No suit just a short and crocs shoes for safety (j/k)
What i need the meter right now is for Pv measurements. I don't think I will exceed the 1000v DC mark often but it can be done by a mistake.
This looks like a small beast...so his price.It can mesure up to 1500v 393 FC Solar Clamp Meter CAT III 1500 V
All reputable meters these days have a “Category” rating. They try to make up this whole system of voltages and usages but the fact is it’s nothing as glamorous as it looks. There is no testing for environment or anything like that. For solar/PV a common rating would be say CAT III 1000 V or CAT IV 600 V. The fact is that the category and voltage rating mean NOTHING. The real meaning is that it is subjected to a much higher voltage…high potted, for something like 10-30 seconds. The two ratings I just mentioned are the SAME. They are rated for 8,000 V for 10 seconds, easily long enough to realize you messed up. It does not harm the meter other than blowing a fuse at worst. Pre-category meters could explode in your hands. And just because it is say CAT III 1000 V it might only read 600 VAC/DC.

As far as arc flash PV modules have a high impedance. Do NOT use the tables in 70E for DC. They are so wrong it’s ludicrous. NESC provides far more up to date guidance. One of the big things with utility equipment is it’s physically larger so lower arc flash and usually the arc travels WAY away from the worker. So most advice from 70E is wrong and that’s why utility applications are clearly out of scope in the intro. But many stupid companies don’t have engineers who can read.
 

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Just trying to get home
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I need 5000 minimum. Not happening.
 

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From reading the post you are asking for a very specific piece of equipment that I would not want to hold, under any circumstances. I have seen 600v rated VOM blow up in someones hand, with and with out rubber gloves. Never pretty.
Every MV tool I have ever used was for voltage, and from the end of a hot stick. I have searched a bit and did not find anything for current.
 

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Chief Flunky
Field Service Engineer
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From reading the post you are asking for a very specific piece of equipment that I would not want to hold, under any circumstances. I have seen 600v rated VOM blow up in someones hand, with and with out rubber gloves. Never pretty.
Every MV tool I have ever used was for voltage, and from the end of a hot stick. I have searched a bit and did not find anything for current.
You won’t. Instruments for utility work fall in three groups. You can find them on “linemen” stores like J Harlen or utility contractor stores like Mitchell Instruments. You use standard low voltage equipment in work around ways. Or you use built in sensors. Using built in sensors the relays in switchgear will be connected to say 120 VAC PTs and 5 A CTs and shunts for DC. Just open the low voltage compartment and take readings from the back. This is how relay techs do most of their work. The only tricky part is documentation and the problem that often you are trying to troubleshoot the sensor itself. You can of course supply your own PTs, CTs, and shunts although you have to poser down to wire them in and have to deal with space and door interlocks. I don’t do this in practice. Too much work and risk.

As far as unconventional there’s not much you can do with voltage. But with current recognize that unshielded cable isn’t safe to touch but if you use a clamp on or flexible current probe (Rogowski) that’s how the switchgear itself is built. Even bushing CTs on transmission line transformers use 600 V CTs with enough air gap. So getting AC current readings using portable flexible probes is easy and safe.

Getting into line tools look on a utility contractor site like Mitchell Instruments or a dedicated lineman supply like J Harlen. They sell “hook” style current meters and phasing meters like a Bieiers PD25 which is a resistive divider and an analog or digital meter. This lets you measure Volts and Amos but don’t expect high accuracy. It’s not instrument grade. It’s just easy and convenient. I’ve troubleshot blown BAY-O-NET fuse problems many times this way using a phasing meter or the probe I mentioned earlier.

All these are basic relay technician procedures for field testing and troubleshooting. You will also run into a lot of “home made” stuff that has varying degrees of safety.
 
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