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Discussion Starter · #3 ·

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So if you add both the legs you will get the difference on the neutral. What causes it to not have voltage running threw it.
But voltage does run thru it.
If you remove the neutral from the bus, you would read voltage from the wire to ground or neutral bar.
That is called an open neutral
Dangerous to people and equipment when that happens, so don't do it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
wcord said:
But voltage does run thru it. If you remove the neutral from the bus, you would read voltage from the wire to ground or neutral bar. That is called an open neutral Dangerous to people and equipment when that happens, so don't do it.
Yea i remember when I was an apprentice a journey man showed me by cutting a neutral and it become hot but while connected it was fine. I just never understood the physics behind it
 

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Yea i remember when I was an apprentice a journey man showed me by cutting a neutral and it become hot but while connected it was fine. I just never understood the physics behind it
Think of an electric wire as a water hose.
Electrons enter one end and go out the other.
Water goes in one end and out the other to ground.

More water flow is amperage.
Higher pressure is voltage
Size of the hose is resistance

Simple analogy, but it helps
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
wcord said:
Think of an electric wire as a water hose. Electrons enter one end and go out the other. Water goes in one end and out the other to ground. More water flow is amperage. Higher pressure is voltage Size of the hose is resistance Simple analogy, but it helps
Yea thats what i was always taught also. So would you say the current is present but unless u cut the hose(open neutral) theres no pressure?
 

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Think of an electric wire as a water hose.
Electrons enter one end and go out the other.
Water goes in one end and out the other to ground.

More water flow is amperage.
Higher pressure is voltage
Size of the hose is resistance

Simple analogy, but it helps
good comparison! and when that hose leaks.............
 
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