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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
(slightly misleading title)
I was doing a kitchen remodel today and noticed an electrical fire like smell. I opened up the panel, used my temp gun to check for hot spots (were none), tightened everything, and still had the smell hours late. I talked to the homeowner and told him to call the POCO and let them know that the meter smells like it's on fire, and the readout is blank, so it is more than 99% likely the meter itself.

He calls the POCO and they told him that they will get to it when they can, as actual fires are more important than just the smell. The call was made at around 10am this morning, and I left the job at 4:15. Still no POCO. I told him that I really wasn't comfortable with leaving the main on or the meter in, but he said that his basement would flood if I shut power off. :(

An actual fire more important than just something that smells like it's on fire? Surely there aren't that many fires that are of concern to pOCO. I'd think that is something that they might want to get on, no? :laughing:

Hopefully the house is still standing when they get to it, I just found it odd. The poor guy (homeowner) is dealing with a kitchen remodel because a tree fell through his roof, the last thing I want to see is his house on fire.
 

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Umm, maybe try calling the fire department? :rolleyes::whistling2:

If there is a smell of smoke, and you have reason to believe that the power meter is either on fire (even without visible flame) or about to catch on fire, then let the FD do their job. When the FD calls the POCO they are much more likely to respond quicker. :thumbsup:

Oh, and trying to pull a bad meter like the one you described is a very bad idea. If the base of the meter itself is melted (very likely) or if the lug supports are overheated, you'll either create an arc flash or end up with live parts stuck in the socket. :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Well did you open the meter socket and take a peak or what?
I did not pull the meter. See above.

I've seen bad meters pulled in person and don't wish to pull one myself. That is all on the poco. It is their equipment to deal with.

The meter not reading anything was an obvious indication that the meter was the problem. Had I have seen that first, I wouldn't even bother opening the panel to check.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Umm, maybe try calling the fire department? :rolleyes::whistling2:

If there is a smell of smoke, and you have reason to believe that the power meter is either on fire (even without visible flame) or about to catch on fire, then let the FD do their job. When the FD calls the POCO they are much more likely to respond quicker. :thumbsup:

Oh, and trying to pull a bad meter like the one you described is a very bad idea. If the base of the meter itself is melted (very likely) or if the lug supports are overheated, you'll either create an arc flash or end up with live parts stuck in the socket. :eek:
That is on the homeowner who was with me. Poco didn't seem to think the smell was a concern, so no fd called. If I didn't have the h.o. present, I do think that would be a valid option.
 
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