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Tell them they can either pay you to fix it right or walk. If you try to make it work and the inspector doesn't like it or some other catch, then it's your problem.
t
 

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"You can't make chicken soup from chicken chit".

Anything but the correct size mud rings is going to look like a king size screw up.

Just the facts of life.
I think we've all been in this kind of position. You try to push through on the path you started on trying to force the result you want, and it really ends up costing you more time, money and frustration than if you had just started over.

I made a mistake on some wall sconces on half a floor. I thought I had read in the specs 60'' to center. Turns out it said 6'0'' and I didn't notice until I came back to finishing the other half.

I spent a few evenings after work with a couple volunteers removing sheetrock and moving everything up. Can't imagine waiting until the walls were painted and finished.
 

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Commercial Foreman - San Diego
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Discussion Starter #29
Thanks everyone for your replies. I've gotten a handful of very useful ideas out of this. Monday should prove to be very interesting.

I'm going to press my superintendent and project manager one more time to allow us to remove drywall and tile to install the correct mud-rings, even though he was very clear about not wanting to do this mid last week. I still think it's the best, and SHOULD be, the only idea. However, I'm pretty sure he will reject this out of hand, again.

I'm not prepared to resign my position over this issue, I'm considering refusing to modify the boxes and requesting being removed from the project. That would probably severely hurt my career at this company, however, I've been seriously considering pressing more into my own business so that could potentially give me the push I needed. A part of me feels maybe I'm being tested to see how much of a "Team Player" I am.

I'm honestly not sure how I'll proceed and will probably take the remainder of the weekend to consider my options. Thanks again for everyone's thoughts and opinions.
 

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Thanks everyone for your replies. I've gotten a handful of very useful ideas out of this. Monday should prove to be very interesting.

I'm going to press my superintendent and project manager one more time to allow us to remove drywall and tile to install the correct mud-rings, even though he was very clear about not wanting to do this mid last week. I still think it's the best, and SHOULD be, the only idea. However, I'm pretty sure he will reject this out of hand, again.

I'm not prepared to resign my position over this issue, I'm considering refusing to modify the boxes and requesting being removed from the project. That would probably severely hurt my career at this company, however, I've been seriously considering pressing more into my own business so that could potentially give me the push I needed. A part of me feels maybe I'm being tested to see how much of a "Team Player" I am.

I'm honestly not sure how I'll proceed and will probably take the remainder of the weekend to consider my options. Thanks again for everyone's thoughts and opinions.
I spent a few years on the "closer crew" in a new commercial construction company. That sucked. We were all the time trying to figure out what some other guys had done and why they had wired it this or that way. Most of those guys were either long gone or had moved on to start some other big project that the company had. By the time we would show up, the building was either already being occupied by the customer or was in the final punch out stages by the GC.

Always an angry GC/customer that was fed up with whatever. And here we were bringing in ladder, wire and tools on newly laid floors and bumping around on finished walls. LOL.
 

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Beam Me Up Scotty
Elechicken
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So they don't want it fixed correctly? Get that in writing (that they don't want to cut open the wall for you to change the mud rings). Whatever you're going to do to fix it, they're going to say "that doesn't look right". In writing, you can prove they didn't want to repair it properly.

Then, go to Deep Switch Plate Cover, Thick Outlet Wall Plates and order deep cover plates for most/all of the devices (whatever they will fit on).

Then make sure walkthroughs are completed before mudding on the next job...
 

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Discussion Starter #32
So they don't want it fixed correctly? Get that in writing (that they don't want to cut open the wall for you to change the mud rings). Whatever you're going to do to fix it, they're going to say "that doesn't look right". In writing, you can prove they didn't want to repair it properly.

Then, go to Deep Switch Plate Cover, Thick Outlet Wall Plates and order deep cover plates for most/all of the devices (whatever they will fit on).

Then make sure walkthroughs are completed before mudding on the next job...

Correct, they are behind on hours, material, and labor on this job. They specifically said they do not want to open walls for repairs, and singled out the mud rings as an example. I came onto this job last week after they had fired the FM responsible to clean up the mess.

Getting it in writing is a good idea. I'll probably proceed with an email chain at the very least with my Super and PM.

Let me be clear. I wasn't responsible for this, I'm just trying to fix it. I don't want my name on it, even anonymously via a website.
 

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I'm going to press my superintendent and project manager one more time to allow us to remove drywall and tile to install the correct mud-rings, even though he was very clear about not wanting to do this mid last week. I still think it's the best, and SHOULD be, the only idea. However, I'm pretty sure he will reject this out of hand, again.
I tend to agree that this is not worth falling on your sword over, especially if you are not the one that created the mess in the first place.

The simple solution is to get the "leadership" to tell you how they want it done in a code compliant method if they do not like your code compliant method; it should really be that simple.

"I have given this much thought and I don't see a way to make this installation aesthetically pleasing, in a code compliant way other than to open up the walls and install the correct sized mud ring(s). I have considered building out the surface with decorative elements, or using surface mount type covers, but those options are not attractive or not code compliant. If I modify the rings, then I am not complying with the manufacturer's intended use and potentially I am making an unsafe situation.

While I consider myself a well rounded electrician with XX years of experience, I have not come across a situation like this previously and I will defer to your direction on an alternative code compliant solution."


Cheers
John
 

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I tend to agree that this is not worth falling on your sword over, especially if you are not the one that created the mess in the first place.

The simple solution is to get the "leadership" to tell you how they want it done in a code compliant method if they do not like your code compliant method; it should really be that simple.

"I have given this much thought and I don't see a way to make this installation aesthetically pleasing, in a code compliant way other than to open up the walls and install the correct sized mud ring(s). I have considered building out the surface with decorative elements, or using surface mount type covers, but those options are not attractive or not code compliant. If I modify the rings, then I am not complying with the manufacturer's intended use and potentially I am making an unsafe situation.

While I consider myself a well rounded electrician with XX years of experience, I have not come across a situation like this previously and I will defer to your direction on an alternative code compliant solution."


Cheers
John
Good write up.

I second this. Serve that dog turd right back at them and see what they say.
 

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Where there is only drywall on the finished surface a 2 gang ring could be cut in, and a 2 gang plate with one side blank & the other side either a duplex receptacle or toggle switch, but they look like hell compared to the normal single gang plates. My opinion is the company is going to have to bite the bullet & fix the problem, they screwed it up & now they get to fix it.
 

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So.

I've recently arrived on an ongoing site that has many problems. Apparently those in charge weren't able to read Floorplans and wall-type prints because there are about 50-60 1-1/4" single gang mud rings sticking out past finish drywall and finish tile by anywhere from 1" to 1/4"

Awesome. I've been asked to handle the problem.

My knee-jerk smartass remark to cut them all out and replace them with the correct mudrings was giving a short, not-amused bark of laughter followed by an adamant, figure something else out, remark.

Outside of grinding off the sides and bending the top and bottom over to re-tap I can't come up with any other good solutions. I'm prepared to go this route. However, I figured I'd ask the internet hive-mind if anyone has come across any good tips, tricks or neat gizmos or gadgets that are designed to solve this problem.

Let the good times roll.
Depending on the mounting, shove it back in the wall with the handle of your hammer. Done.
 

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As much as they don’t want to hear this, sh!t runs uphill in this situation. Your super and PM and everyone up the chain are responsible for the people under them and they’re just going to have to pay the piper. Your wage is higher than a drywaller’s. Don’t fart around trying to re-invent the wheel. Take 5 minutes to cut it out and change the ring and pay a drywaller to patch it. Also, as has been stated, the drywallers, painters, tile guys, and GC are at least partly complicit here. No way this should have gotten this far. I would try to spread the cost around a little bit, futile though it may be.
 

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As much as they don’t want to hear this, sh!t runs uphill in this situation. Your super and PM and everyone up the chain are responsible for the people under them and they’re just going to have to pay the piper. Your wage is higher than a drywaller’s. Don’t fart around trying to re-invent the wheel. Take 5 minutes to cut it out and change the ring and pay a drywaller to patch it. Also, as has been stated, the drywallers, painters, tile guys, and GC are at least partly complicit here. No way this should have gotten this far. I would try to spread the cost around a little bit, futile though it may be.
While I agree in principle, I'm not sure how much cost of repair you can push on the other trades that didn't notice an electrical mistake. Now the GC, that's different, it's his job to notice these things before they are a problem.

ETA: I know a guy who is in these kind of arguments all the time on jobs and I think his approach on this would be to blame the GC for lack of supervision and tell him you will be fair on the change order to fix it. :)
 

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If you can change out the mud rings and cover with an oversized 2 gang plate then I think Dennis has the best idea using a 2-gang plate with one position being a blank. You will have to be precise in cutting that tile.
 
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