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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Good Afternoon,

I did my first install of a chandelier in my house Saturday. It was amature hour for sure, but I learned from it. I had one of those gaudy crystal chandeliers that was from the 1980's before this install.

I had to learn to balance the new fixture on my knee while wiring and securing it. I didn't have a big ladder so I was able to rent this 12 foot ladder for 20 dollars for the day. Man those ladders cost over 300 dollars so renting one really helped.

This is my best Mike Holmes on homes pose.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I don't want to burst your bubble but your chandelier is being held by the wire not the chain. You need to fix that...
Oh wasn't sure what you were talking about, but now I see there is slack in the chain. Thanks for pointing that out, I'll remove a chain link or two to fix that.
 

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Or push the slack into the canopy up above. There should be slack in the wire when you are done.
 

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Crystal chandeliers aren't gaudy. It just depends on your taste. I have had one for several years now and goes where I go. It's been hung in 4 homes over the years and I even built a custom box that I transport it in when I move. The box has an eye hook at the top that it hangs from so I don't have to remove all the crystals or disassemble anything.
 

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I like practice at home too, I even bought some pipes to learn how to use a heat gun. I've learn how to wire a 3 way switch at home also. I really want to learn how to bend pipe too. I forgot, my instructor told me he used to hang on his ceiling fan to see if it can hold his weight. You might wanna try that out to see if it's good or not ☺.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I like practice at home too, I even bought some pipes to learn how to use a heat gun. I've learn how to wire a 3 way switch at home also. I really want to learn how to bend pipe too. I forgot, my instructor told me he used to hang on his ceiling fan to see if it can hold his weight. You might wanna try that out to see if it's good or not ☺.
Wow, that is interesting. Ceiling fan boxes only rated for 65 pounds I think. Guess it depends on which one you buy, but I imagine it can hold more for a short period of time.
 

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I forgot, my instructor told me he used to hang on his ceiling fan to see if it can hold his weight. You might wanna try that out to see if it's good or not ☺.
Definitely don't do that. Standard fan boxes are rated for 70 lbs dynamic load and 150 lbs static load. You would be a dynamic load.
 

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If your into doing pull ups and swinging from chandeliers you may want the Westinghouse Lighting 0180000 Heavy Chandelier and Fixture Brace.
They claim it supports fixtures up to 800-Pound.
156489
 

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I was asked to go and inspect light fixtures made by art and design students. They were mostly plugged into outlets on the ceiling of the atrium that went through 3 floors. Seriously plugged in.
Most the cord was the structure and not one of the metal ones had a ground. I shut off the power and barricaded the falling area and waited until the screams came. I was the only employee that held a certification for electrical inspections. (IAEI) It was a lot of fun watching the instructors and my management argue over missiles hung from outlets on the ceilings. I will admit some of the fixtures were very light. One was made completely out of paper. I used it for the fire demonstration took about 2 and half hours before it was smoldering.
The next year I gave a 2 hour talk before the classes about grounding/bonding and NEC. When I got to UL and CSA I had lost the audience.
 

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No matter how you look at it a fixture should be supported properly. Some fixtures that are real heavy come with boxes included and are specifically designed for the fixture. At least the good ones do. I have not done a lot of residential work but I did get one like that and it had a 1 foot long nipple and the diagram showed it with a plate laid across the top of the rafters that the nipple went threw and down to the box where the chain attached. I guess they didn't want to just depend on the 8/32 or 10/32 screws of a 150 lb rated box to be the only means of support.
 

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You have all heard of the Phantom of the Opera, the chandelier that swings out over the audience weights about 600 pounds. The real trick to the Phantom shows was there were at least 6 groups touring, so you could get a big troupe or a small troupe.
The troupe showed up and proceeded with a come along, chains and cables to "rig a point of attachment to the building" The electric part was simple. The stage manager was on the stage and they swung the fixture out over the empty seats. I came out of the ceiling and looked shaking my head as the second test swing started. The trusses were moving as the fixture completed its arc. Fortunately for everyone the building manager said stop, called a structural engineer and they welded a attachment point up in the ceiling structure. Opening night when the fixture in full brilliance swang out over the oohs and ahhh's there were smiles behind stage as we all knew nothing was going wrong. The show must go on
 
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