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Would like to know what training centers you suggest. I saw a 20 hr online with a 40 hr hands on course schedule.

We got into solar as a sub and would like to get training so we can take the test and further our earnings potential and future opportunities.

Thank you in advance for your suggestions.
 

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Would like to know what training centers you suggest. I saw a 20 hr online with a 40 hr hands on course schedule.

We got into solar as a sub and would like to get training so we can take the test and further our earnings potential and future opportunities.

Thank you in advance for your suggestions.
That sounds good to me, is that all solar training?
 

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More than lead and elbows
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I took 3 or 4 classes from a group called Imagine Solar. They were free at our hall, and were definitely good classes. I think only one person actually took the test. Nabcep is not required in NM, and the 100$ per year and other membership fees make it quite a pain to keep. It sounds like someone's pockets grew when they became state mandated to me.
 

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I'm sorry, but it's not based on anything other than cash. You take a 40 hour class, and have two installs (unlicensed, no inspector, anything goes) and you are eligible to take the test. You can be a roofer, or a plumber, or a laborer, or just a DIY guy. The companies make money giving this 40 hour training course and then bring 2 set ups of panels and inverters. You install them in the parking lot, and now you can take the test!
 

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Backstay, you're of course entitled to your opinion but NABCEP is NOT a scam. Here in California, and most states, it is NOT required to work in solar. It just helps to get employed because it tells an employer that you KNOW solar...the way it works, why it works, when something is wrong, and how to fix it.
If I was a layperson looking for a solar company to put a system on my roof, I wouldn't do business with them unless they had NABCEP certified people on board. Not that you're not a good installer if you're not NABCEP...I'm sure you are and so are many other folks but how do I know that ahead of time? One way I would know would be that you've been trained to NABCEP standards.
If I was a solar integrator looking for prospective employees, why would I hire anyone off the street that likely knows nothing about solar or PV? Much better to hire someone that has gone through the minimum 40-hours of training and actually passed the difficult and rigid NABCEP-EL exam.
Just my 2-cents...ok, maybe more like 50-cents.
 

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More than lead and elbows
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Backstay, you're of course entitled to your opinion but NABCEP is NOT a scam. Here in California, and most states, it is NOT required to work in solar. It just helps to get employed because it tells an employer that you KNOW solar...the way it works, why it works, when something is wrong, and how to fix it.
If I was a layperson looking for a solar company to put a system on my roof, I wouldn't do business with them unless they had NABCEP certified people on board. Not that you're not a good installer if you're not NABCEP...I'm sure you are and so are many other folks but how do I know that ahead of time? One way I would know would be that you've been trained to NABCEP standards.
If I was a solar integrator looking for prospective employees, why would I hire anyone off the street that likely knows nothing about solar or PV? Much better to hire someone that has gone through the minimum 40-hours of training and actually passed the difficult and rigid NABCEP-EL exam.
Just my 2-cents...ok, maybe more like 50-cents.

True, I'd rather hire a nabcep certified roofer instead of a real electrician.

Look the information presented in the classes was great, and really informative, but it wasn't anything I didn't get in a fifth year apprenticeship book from the jatc, in fact they taught the class from that book. The problem I had was that these guys came in saying they were training people other than electricians, in fact the "instructor" had many installs from side work that never had an inspector or electrician on the jobs.

PV is cool and all, but it sure isn't rocket science. There are many other things in the trade that should require more training i.e. Relay protection and controls, xfmr and breaker testing and certification, PLC programming and maintenance, etc. but PV isn't something that can justify a 300$ Membership every few years
 

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It's state mandated in some cases. The EC needs to have (sorry, pay for) a qualified installer through an organization that contributes what to the industry? Qualified journeymen? Nope. Research and development? Nope. Listed material and equipment? Nope. Codes and code enforcement? Nope. Insurance and or any liability on the system from a certified installer? Nope.

Looks like a duck, quacks like a duck...
 

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move forward

Would like to know what training centers you suggest. I saw a 20 hr online with a 40 hr hands on course schedule.

We got into solar as a sub and would like to get training so we can take the test and further our earnings potential and future opportunities.

Thank you in advance for your suggestions.
Tigo offers training on their optimizers. 3 Credits for Nabceb or CEC. As you get older you might want to consider reliability engineering or predictive maintenance by taking up infrared scanning used by utilities and industry to predict failures. To get you up to making 130k a year, since installation will put a strand on you.
 

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got it

Scam, some guy started it and all these government agencies jumped onboard. What I saw was out of date methods when I paid for their study guide. It's now required by some, too bad.
Yes they talk about a certificate, but you are not going to get one without years on the job. And nowadays just part time work. 10 hours of OSHA training, and so on. 3 to 5 jobs in which you were in charge of. If you have good study habits you can do the research. Plenty of support in string design from sites like google earth and Fornius for design. Talk to the local governments on standard for permits such as fire codes for off sets. A lot of wholesalers will try to sell you anything even if it won't fit on your roof. Information is free or should be. Did you here about the 14 year old that built a nuclear reactor in his garage. Or the mechanic in England that made a 100 mile air powered car. A good tank cost a lot less then Iron Edison Batteries. Well if if works use it, still can't wait until we are burn hydrogen for fuel and putting out water vapor.
 

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which state?

NABCEP is still a scam, state mandated. But still a scam.
An electrical contractor should meet all of the requirements. Exception to the NEC code, Indian Reservation rural electric co-op and so on. What about all of those who have a Professional Engineering license? Yes a bonded contractor I agree. A lot of installers are not electricians. Rural Missouri depends on the size of town, city and local zoning. If you Know your stuff and work under a PE or a Master Electrician or a journeyman as a apprentice you will likely do all right as long as the contractor has a valid license for the location. And it is not like a driver license that you can use nation wide.
 
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