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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Came across a good read, thought to give them there own thread. Anyway, without a further delay:


Ground-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection for Personnel – Dwelling Units – Bathtubs or shower stalls
Significance
The new Code mandates expanded use of ground-fault circuit-interrupters (GFCIs) in dwelling units.
Analysis
All 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampere receptacle outlets installed within 6 ft of the outside edge of a bathtub or shower stall shall be GFCI protected. This change recognizes that not all bathtubs and showers are installed in rooms that qualify as bathrooms per the NEC definition. Where bathtubs or showers are installed in rooms or areas that require AFCI protection, both AFCI and GFCI protection are required for a receptacle within 6 ft of the tub or shower.
These areas may have tile or other conductive floors that, when wet, increase the hazard of using receptacles located in the area that are not GFCI protected. Note that this change resembles existing 680.71, which requires GFCI protection for receptacles located within 6 ft horizontally of the inside walls of a hydromassage bathtub.
Summary
In dwelling units, all 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampere receptacle outlets installed within 6 ft of the outside edge of a bathtub or shower stall shall be GFCI protected. Not all bathtubs and shower stalls are located in bathrooms, where GFCI protection is already required.
Application Question
Does this Code change apply to guest rooms and guest suites?
Courtesy of Interiorholic.com
Answer
The new GFCI requirement does not apply to guest rooms and guest suites unless they qualify as dwelling units.
Code Refresher
According to the NEC, a bathroom is an area that includes a basin and one or more of the following: a toilet, a urinal, a tub, a shower, a bidet, or similar plumbing fixtures.
According to the NEC, a dwelling unit is a single unit, providing complete and independent living facilities for one or more persons, including permanent provisions for living, sleeping, cooking, and sanitation.
Copyright 2013 by Patrick S. Ouillette, P.E. 14 2 10.8(A)(10) Branch Circuits 2014 NEC
Ground-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection for Personnel – Dwelling Units – Laundry areas
Significance
Dwelling unit laundry rooms or areas have been added to the list where ground-fault circuit-interrupters (GFCIs) are required.
Analysis
All 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampere receptacle outlets installed in dwelling unit laundry rooms or areas shall be GFCI protected. These circuits will also require AFCI protection (see the change in 210.12(A)). The requirement includes all such receptacles in laundry areas, not just the receptacle that supplies a clothes washer. According to existing Section 210.11(C)(2), at least one 20-ampere branch circuit shall be provided to supply the laundry receptacle outlet(s) required by 210.52(F). This circuit shall have no other outlets. Section 210.52(F) requires that, in dwelling units, at least one receptacle outlet be installed in areas designated for the installation of laundry equipment, unless an exception applies. Laundry equipment includes clothes washers, gas clothes dryers (the 120-volt pilot, etc.), clothes irons/flatirons, etc. The principal reason for the change is that laundry areas involve electrical appliances and water, with a resulting increased risk of electric shock.
Summary
All 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampere receptacle outlets installed in dwelling unit laundry rooms or areas shall be GFCI protected.
Application Question
Where the laundry equipment and provisions are located in an area rather than a room, how is the border determined between laundry receptacles and receptacles that are not considered in the laundry area?
Answer
This will be up to the AHJ. It seems reasonable that receptacles intended for and located to serve laundry related equipment would require GFCI protection.
Code Refresher
Appliance receptacle outlets installed in dwellings for specific appliances, such as laundry equipment, shall be installed within 6 ft of the intended location of the appliance. [210.50(C)]
A load of not less than 1500 volt-amperes shall be included for each 20-A laundry branch circuit installed in a dwelling. [220.52(B)]
The load for household electric clothes dryers installed in dwellings shall be either 5000 watts (VA) or the nameplate rating, whichever is larger. [220.54]
Copyright 2013 by Patrick S. Ouillette, P.E. 15 2 10.8(B)(8) Branch Circuits 2014 NEC
Ground-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection for Personnel – Other Than Dwelling Units – Garages, service bays, and similar areas other than vehicle exhibition halls and showrooms
Significance
This Code change expands the requirement for GFCI-protected receptacles to most types of non-dwelling garages whether or not electrical hand tools or other electrical equipment are to be used.
Analysis
The garages covered by this rule are nondwelling garages not within the scope of Article 511, Commercial Garages, for which GFCI protection for certain receptacles is already a requirement. Article 511 covers areas used for service and repair operations in connection with self-propelled vehicles in which volatile flammable liquids or flammable gases are used for fuel or power. A flammable liquid is any liquid that has a closed-cup flashpoint below 100°F (37.8°C). Garages for the service and repair of diesel-fueled vehicles are not within the scope of Article 511, since diesel fuel has a flash point above 100°F.
Magellan’s Yacht StorageGFCI protection not requiredThe "Volt" - ShowroomOwl’s Head Transportation MuseumGFCI protection requiredDOT Maintenance GarageJim’s RV Sales and ServiceJoe’s Electric Moped RepairMagellan’s Yacht StorageSchool Bus GarageJerry’s Auto Detail
This Code change applies to nondwelling unit garages (including diesel garages), service bays, and similar areas whether or not electrical diagnostic equipment, electrical hand tools, or portable lighting equipment are to be used. The diagram above shows examples of garages where the rule applies. The Code specifically exempts vehicle showrooms and exhibition halls from the GFCI requirement. See 555.19(B)(1) for GFCI requirements for Magellan’s Yacht Storage.
Summary
All 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampere receptacles installed in nondwelling garages, service bays, and similar areas shall have GFCI protection for personnel. Vehicle showrooms and exhibition halls are exempt from the GFCI requirement.
Application Question
Does the NEC define garage?
Answer
Yes, in Article 100: "A building or portion of a building in which one or more self-propelled vehicles can be kept for use, sale, storage, rental, repair, exhibition, or demonstration purposes."
Copyright 2013 by Patrick S. Ouillette, P.E. 16 2 10.8(D) Branch Circuits 2014 NEC
Ground-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection for Personnel – Kitchen Dishwasher Branch Circuit
Significance
At some point it seems likely that whole-house GFCI and AFCI will be the norm. The change in 210.8(D) is one of the instances where the 2014 Code requires both GFCI and AFCI protection. AFCI protection is required for the entire circuit; GFCI protection is required for the appliance.
Analysis
GFCI protection shall be provided for outlets that supply dishwashers installed in dwelling unit locations. GFCI devices have proven effective in reducing shock hazards and are particularly important where an electric appliance or equipment is used within reach of grounded surfaces or objects, such as metal sinks or other grounded metal appliances in kitchens. This Code change is not placed within subsection (A) of 210.8, since it address outlets rather than receptacles. The new requirement applies to both cord-and-plug connected and hard-wired dishwashers. A new AFCI requirement for kitchen circuits (including the DW circuit) is covered in Section 210.12(A).
An AFCI can be used in conjunction with GFCI protection to provide both arcing fault protection and 5 mA ground-fault protection for persons. One way to provide both types of protection is to use an AFCI circuit breaker and a GFCI receptacle. AFCIs that incorporate 5 mA GFCI protection into the same package should become available in the near future. Both AFCI and GFCI devices must be installed in readily accessible locations.
Visit www.AFCISafety.org for a wealth of information on arc-fault circuit interrupters and use of AFCI and GFCI on the same circuit.
Summary
Dishwashers in dwelling units shall be GFCI protected.
Application Question
Where would you locate a GFCI receptacle that serves the dishwasher in a dwelling?
Answer
Since the GFCI receptacle must be readily accessible, a standard receptacle could be located behind the dishwasher (a common practice) connected downstream from a dead-front/blank face GFCI receptacle located on the wall above the kitchen countertop.
Code Refresher
For cord-and-plug-connected appliances, an accessible plug and receptacle is permitted to serve as the required disconnecting means. [422.33(A)]
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Arc-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection – Dwelling Units
Significance
Whole-house protection from the effects of electric arc faults has been the goal of many entities, including the Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC). With expanded arc-fault circuit-interrupter (AFCI) requirements in the 2014 NEC, we’re almost there.
Analysis
The requirement for AFCI protection for 120-volt, single phase, 15- and 20-ampere branch circuits supplying outlets or devices in dwelling units has been expanded to include all such circuits in kitchens and laundry areas. Many dishwasher fires have been reported, so the dishwasher circuit is a reasonable addition to the AFCI requirement. Kitchen appliance circuits, circuits for food waste disposers, lighting circuits, etc. are included in the expanded protection. The AFCI protection for the applicable laundry circuit(s) includes circuits that supply lighting and receptacle outlets in laundry rooms or laundry areas. The only 120-volt, 15- and 20-ampere branch circuits that are exempt from AFCI protection are those that supply outlets in bathrooms, garages, outdoors, and basements, except for basement rooms included in the list of rooms or areas in 210.12(A) requiring AFCI protection (e.g., laundry outlets in a basement require AFCI protection). Foyers are rooms or areas similar to hallways and should be wired to comply with the AFCI requirement.
The 2014
NEC requires all AFCI devices to be installed in a readily accessible location. This will facilitate resetting and testing. Testing should be performed monthly. An AFCI receptacle installed beneath a kitchen sink cabinet to supply a food waste disposer does not meet the definition of readily accessible, "Capable of being reached quickly for operation, renewal, or inspections without requiring those to whom ready access is requisite to climb over or remove obstacles…." AFCI circuit breakers are readily accessible by compliance with existing 240.24(A), which requires overcurrent devices to be readily accessible. This provision for ready access applies to all subsections of 210.12, including new subsection (C), Dormitory Units.
The 2014
NEC presents six options/methods for accomplishing AFCI protection. The methods can be viewed as a systems approach to compliance. The combinations of prescribed devices and wiring methods are deemed to provide AFCI protection equal to that of combination type AFCIs, detecting and mitigating both series and parallel arc faults.
Outlet branch circuit (OBC) type AFCIs are becoming available. These receptacles along with combination type and branch/feeder type AFCI circuit breakers are the AFCI components used in the systems approach to AFCI protection of branch circuits. These three devices are pictured on the following page, emphasizing the marking of the AFCI type.
Each of the six options for AFCI protection is described on subsequent pages. Following the description, the system is shown in pictorial form to assist in understanding the details of the requirements.
Copyright 2013 by Patrick S. Ouillette, P.E. 18 2 10.12(A) Branch Circuits 2014 NEC
Siemens Q115AFC 15-amp, Siemens Q115AF 15-amp, 1 pole,
1 pole, 120-volt combination 120-volt branch/feeder AFCI
type AFCI
Leviton AFTR1 SmartlockPro
®, 15-amp, 125-volt
outlet branch circuit AFCI receptacle
Copyright 2013 by Patrick S. Ouillette, P.E. 19 2 10.12(A) Branch Circuits 2014 NEC
These are the options for providing AFCI protection:
(1) A listed combination type AFCI installed to provide protection for the entire branch circuit. There are no additional requirements when this method is used. The system is pictured below.
Standard receptacle outletsNM cable or other wiring method permitted by the NECCombination type AFCI breaker in panel
(2) A listed branch/feeder type AFCI installed at the origin of the branch circuit in combination with a listed outlet branch circuit (OBC) type AFCI installed at the first outlet box on the circuit. The first outlet box in the circuit shall be marked to indicate that it is the first outlet of the circuit. The system is pictured below.
Outlet branch- circuit type AFCI NM cable or other wiring method permitted by the NECBranch/feeder type AFCI breaker in panelStandard receptacle outletMarked to indicate it is the first outlet on the circuit
(3) A listed supplemental arc protection circuit breaker installed at the origin of the branch circuit in combination with a listed outlet branch circuit (OBC) type AFCI installed at the first outlet box on the circuit, provided the following conditions are met: (a) the branch circuit wiring is continuous from the overcurrent device to the OBC type AFCI, (b) the maximum length of the branch circuit wiring from the overcurrent device to the AFCI device does not exceed 50 ft for a 14 AWG conductor or 70 ft for a 12 AWG conductor, and (c) the first outlet box in the circuit is marked to indicate that it is the first outlet of the circuit. The supplemental arc protection circuit breaker concept is being developed by the circuit breaker industry specifically for this application, based on selected requirements from UL 1699, Standard for Arc-Fault Circuit-Interrupters.
The system is pictured below.
Copyright 2013 by Patrick S. Ouillette, P.E. 20 2 10.12(A) Branch Circuits 2014 NEC
Outlet branch- circuit type AFCI NM cable or other wiring method permitted by the NECStandard receptacle outletMarked to indicate it is the first outlet on the circuitContinuous wiring,70 ft max. for 12 AWG,50 ft max. for 14 AWG Supplemental arc protection circuit breaker
(4) A listed branch circuit overcurrent protective device (e.g., a standard circuit breaker) installed at the origin of the branch circuit in combination with a listed outlet branch circuit (OBC) type AFCI installed at the first outlet box on the circuit, provided the following conditions are met: (a) the branch circuit wiring is continuous from the overcurrent device to the OBC type AFCI, (b) the maximum length of the branch circuit wiring from the overcurrent device to the AFCI device does not exceed 50 ft for a 14 AWG conductor or 70 ft for a 12 AWG conductor, (c) the first outlet box in the circuit is marked to indicate that it is the first outlet of the circuit, and (d) the combination of the branch circuit overcurrent device and the AFCI receptacle is identified as meeting the requirements for a "System Combination" type AFCI and is listed as such. This option introduces the concept of certifying a branch circuit overcurrent device and OBC type AFCI in specific system combinations that have been tested and certified to comply with UL 1699 using a new outline of investigation. After this outline is developed, it will be published as UL Subject 1699C.The system is pictured below.
Outlet branch- circuit type AFCINM cable or other wiring method permitted by the NECStandard receptacle outletMarked to indicate it is the first outlet on the circuitContinuous wiring,70 ft max. for 12 AWG,50 ft max. for 14 AWG Standard circuit breakerThe combination of the circuit breaker and the AFCI receptacle must be identified as meeting the requirements for a "System Combination" type AFCI.
Copyright 2013 by Patrick S. Ouillette, P.E. 21 2 10.12(A) Branch Circuits 2014 NEC
(5) Where RMC, IMC, EMT, Type MC cable, or steel armored Type AC cables meeting the requirements of 250.118 for equipment grounding conductors, metal wireways, metal auxiliary gutters, and metal outlet and junction boxes are installed for the portion of the branch circuit between the overcurrent protective device and the first outlet, it shall be permitted to install a listed OBC type AFCI device at the first outlet to provide protection for the remaining portion of the branch circuit. Metal wireways or large junction boxes installed above panels are a convenient way to transition from horizontally run branch circuits to vertical raceways between the panels and the wireway or junction box located above the panel. As such, they become part of the raceway system for the branch circuits. The system is pictured below.
MC cable from panelboard to AFCI receptacle or any of these methods RMC, IMC, EMT, MC cable, steel armored AC cable, metal wireways, and metal auxiliary gutters are permitted.Outlet branch- circuit type AFCI in metal boxNM cable or other wiring method permitted by the NECStandard receptacle outletStandard circuit breaker
(6) Where a listed metal or nonmetallic conduit or tubing or Type MC cable is encased in not less than 2 in. of concrete for the portion of the branch circuit between the branch circuit overcurrent device and the first outlet, it shall be permitted to install a listed OBC type AFCI device at the first outlet to provide protection for the remaining portion of the branch circuit. The system is pictured below.
Standard circuit breakerPVC encased in a minimum 2 in. of concrete. Any listed metal or nonmetallic conduit or tubing or Type MC cable suitable for encasement in concrete may be used.Outlet branch- circuit type AFCI in metal boxRMC, IMC, EMT, or continuous run of MC cable suitable for concrete encasement can be used for the portion of the circuit not encased in concrete.Standard receptacle outletOr other wiring method permitted by the NECOR
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Exception Where an individual branch circuit for a fire alarm system installed in accordance with 760.41(B) or 760.121(B) is installed in RMC, IMC, EMT, or steel-sheathed Type AC or MC cable meeting the equipment grounding requirements in 250.118, with metal outlet and junction boxes, AFCI protection shall be permitted to be omitted. Sections 760.41(B) for non–power-limited fire alarm circuits and 760.121(B) for power-limited fire alarm circuits state that the fire alarm branch circuit shall not be supplied through AFCI or GFCI devices. Single- and multiple-station smoke alarms in dwellings powered by circuits that are protected by GFCI or AFCI devices shall have a secondary power source [see 29.6.3(5) of NFPA 72-2013, National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code].
Fire Alarm Control PanelSupply overcurrent device located in Panel LPPanel LPThe circuit disconnecting means shall have red identification .FIRE ALARM CIRCUITMC cable or any of these methodsfrom panelboard to fire alarm control panelRMC, IMC, EMT, or steel- sheathed Type MC or AC cable "FIRE ALARM CIRCUIT"Exempt from AFCI protectionStandard circuit breaker
Summary
The requirement for AFCI protection for 120-volt, single phase, 15- and 20-ampere branch circuits in dwelling units has been expanded to include all such circuits in kitchens and laundry areas. The only branch circuits that are exempt from AFCI protection are those that supply outlets or devices in bathrooms, garages, outdoors, and basements, except for basement rooms included in the list of rooms or areas in 210.12(A) requiring AFCI protection (e.g., laundry outlets in a basement require AFCI protection). The 2014 NEC requires all AFCI devices to be installed in a readily accessible location to facilitate resetting and testing. The 2014 Code presents six options/methods for accomplishing AFCI protection. The methods can be viewed as a systems approach to compliance. The most common methods for providing AFCI protection for branch circuits will likely be by use of combination type AFCI circuit breakers, or by combining standard circuit breakers with outlet branch circuit type AFCIs (AFCI receptacles) as a systems approach to branch circuit AFCI protection.
Application Question: When using a standard circuit breaker in combination with an OBC type AFCI to provide AFCI protection for a branch circuit installed in wood framing members, what wiring method(s) are permitted to be used between the overcurrent device and the first outlet?
Answer: RMC, IMC, EMT, Type MC cable, or steel armored Type AC cable meeting the requirements of 250.118, metal wireways, metal auxiliary gutters, and metal outlet and junction boxes can be installed for the portion of the branch circuit between the overcurrent protective device and the first outlet to provide AFCI protection for the remainder of the branch circuit.
Copyright 2013 by Patrick S. Ouillette, P.E. 23 2 10.12(B) Branch Circuits 2014 NEC
Arc-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection – Branch Circuit Extensions or
Modifications — Dwelling Units
Significance
A new exception has been added to this subsection that will help to clarify when AFCI requirements are applicable to circuit extensions or modifications to existing wiring.
Analysis
The new exception states that the AFCI requirement is not applicable for dwelling unit branch circuit extensions, where the circuit extension is not more than 6′ in length and no additional outlets or devices are added to the circuit. When an existing panel is replaced or upgraded, the branch circuit wiring is not always long enough to connect to the panel overcurrent devices. The exception will allow existing branch circuits to be spliced and extended up to 6′ in cable length without requiring AFCI protection for the branch circuits. This will accommodate panels being moved out of clothes closets and bathrooms, service panels (during service upgrades) being moved closer to where the service-entrance conductors penetrate the outside wall of a building, panels being moved to readily accessible locations, and other situations.
The existing AFCI requirement remains the same. In any of the areas specified in 210.12(A), where branch-circuit wiring is extended, modified, or replaced, the branch circuit shall be protected by either
• A listed combination-type AFCI located at the origin of the branch circuit, or
• A listed outlet branch-circuit type AFCI device located at the first receptacle outlet of the existing branch circuit.
This subsection applies also to kitchens and laundry rooms or areas, since these rooms have been added to the list in 210.12(A). The AFCI devices must meet the new requirement at the beginning of 210.12 for ready access.
Summary
AFCI requirements are not applicable to dwelling unit branch circuit extensions, where the circuit extension is not more than 6′ in length and no additional outlets or devices are added to the existing branch circuit.
Application Question
Statistics show that the majority of electrical fires occur in older homes. How does this exception promote enhanced safety of older circuits that would be better protected by AFCI devices?
Copyright 2013 by Patrick S. Ouillette, P.E. 24 2 10.12(B) Branch Circuits 2014 NEC
Answer
It doesn’t. However, it does encourage other safety enhancements like moving panels to Code-compliant locations, upgrading from fuses to circuit breakers, or increasing the size of an overloaded service (all of which may require circuit extensions), without necessitating the extra cost of AFCI devices. For some, particularly in hard economic times, this extra cost could be a deterrent from making a service or panel upgrade, or from moving a panel. Note that the exception does not apply to circuit modifications or replacements—only short extensions of existing branch circuits, where no outlets or devices are added.
Technical Update
You may be wondering how an AFCI receptacle installed at the first receptacle outlet on an existing circuit compares with a combination-type AFCI circuit breaker in terms of protection of the entire branch circuit. Outlet branch-circuit (OBC) type AFCIs provide both upstream and downstream protection from series arc faults, but provide only downstream protection from parallel arc faults. So, how is the "home run" (that portion of a circuit from the overcurrent device to the first outlet) protected against parallel arcing faults?
Studies have shown that the home run portion of a circuit is, on average, approximately 35% of the total branch circuit length. The magnetic trip (instantaneous) function of a conventional circuit breaker will usually clear a parallel arcing fault in the portion of the circuit from the circuit breaker to the AFCI receptacle. This is contingent on the available fault current at the panel being high enough (approximately 500 A), the instantaneous trip value of the circuit breaker being low enough (less than 200 A), and a low conductor impedance from the circuit breaker to the location of the fault. The conductor impedance depends on the conductor length, size, and material. These parameters were used in writing some of the options in 210.12(A). The home run of a circuit is generally less vulnerable to a fault, being enclosed by construction and not containing splices or cord extensions. The home run conductors are continuous from the circuit breaker to the AFCI device, except perhaps for a switch outlet in an existing branch circuit that could be between the circuit breaker and the AFCI receptacle.
In existing NM cable installations, the AFCI receptacle option cannot be guaranteed to provide equivalent protection to that of a combination-type AFCI installed at the origin of the circuit. Only the options in 210.12(A) provide combination-type AFCI protection or its equivalent. Note that options (5) and (6) of 210.12(A) require more robust protection for the home run than Type NM cable affords.
Copyright 2013 by Patrick S. Ouillette, P.E. 25 2 10.12(B) Branch Circuits 2014 NEC
Install combination-type AFCI circuit breaker in panelboard or install outlet branch-circuit type AFCI here.RBranch-circuit extension120-V, 15- or 20-A existing branch circuit in dwelling unit panelboardAny room or area specified in 210.12(A), where branch-circuit wiring is modified, replaced, or extended Section 210.12(B), general rule, 2011 and 2014 NEC
RExisting panelboardRelocated panelboard Circuit extension not more than 6′No AFCI protection requiredSection 210.12(B), Exception, 2014 NEC120-V, 15- or 20-A existing branch circuit in dwelling unit panelboardAny room or area specified in 210.12(A), where branch-circuit wiring is modified, replaced, or extended
Copyright 2013 by Patrick S. Ouillette, P.E. 26 2 10.12(C) Branch Circuits 2014 NEC
Arc-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection – Dormitory Units
Significance
A new subsection has been added to the requirement for AFCI protection of certain branch circuits.
Analysis
This new subsection addresses AFCI protection for certain branch circuits in dormitory units.
All 120-volt, single phase, 15- and 20-ampere circuits installed to supply outlets in dormitory unit living rooms, bedrooms, hallways, closets, and similar rooms now require AFCI protection using any of the methods in (1) through (6) of 210.12(A). In a typical dormitory room, all branch circuits will require AFCI protection.
Some living facilities for students at colleges and other institutions are apartments rather than dormitories. They qualify as dwelling units per the definition of
dwelling unit and must be wired as such. As used in this subsection, dormitory unit does not envision a bathroom or cooking provisions within the dormitory unit (compartment). A portable microwave oven does not constitute permanent provisions for cooking.
AFCI protection in dormitory units
The AFCI protection requirement now includes dormitory units.
Summary
All 120-volt, single phase, 15- and 20-ampere circuits installed to supply outlets in dormitory unit living rooms, bedrooms, hallways, closets, and similar rooms require AFCI protection using any of the methods in (1) through (6) of 210.12(A).
Copyright 2013 by Patrick S. Ouillette, P.E. 27 2 10.12(C) Branch Circuits 2014 NEC
Application Question
Does this new AFCI requirement apply to modification, extension, or replacement of branch circuit wiring in existing dormitory units?
Answer: No. It applies only to newly installed branch circuits that require AFCI protection.
Code Refresher
Receptacle placement in dormitory units is permitted to accommodate permanent furniture layout, but the quantity of receptacles installed must be in accordance with 210.52(A) for dwelling units. At least two receptacle outlets shall be readily accessible. Where receptacles are installed behind a bed, the receptacle shall be located to prevent the bed from contacting any attachment plug that may be inserted or the receptacle shall be provided with a suitable guard. [210.60]
 

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Head Grunt
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The AFCI isnt really the big deal, Its the huge ass price increase for us on the breakers, that is cutting into profit.
I pass the cost onto the customer but it sure does make them cringe. But when they see the inspector looking for it they know it is required and out of my hands. At this rate we might better just install AFCI breakers throughout the whole panel and GFCI protect every circuit. I am curious to just exactly how many people are actually injured or killed every yr from these types of injuries? The last time i even heard of anyone being harmed was a copper thief who was killed when he cut into a live service with a hacksaw.

Has anyone noticed an increase in GFCI trip calls for foreign made devices/appliances? I got several calls this past summer for folks using laptops on their decks and tripping GFCI receptacles and GFCI breakers. Just had a call yesterday for a new coffee maker tripping any and all the kitchen GFCI's. It worked fine on non GFCI circuits. I recommended she take it back and try another.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The AFCI isnt really the big deal, Its the huge ass price increase for us on the breakers, that is cutting into profit.

They really cut into profit, but the worst part is when they start tripping on treadmills or Flat screens. People dont like to hear your $1500 plasma cant work on the upstairs circuits. To the customer its you who looks like the screw up, not the AFCIs. :no:









I pass the cost onto the customer but it sure does make them cringe. But when they see the inspector looking for it they know it is required and out of my hands. At this rate we might better just install AFCI breakers throughout the whole panel and GFCI protect every circuit. I am curious to just exactly how many people are actually injured or killed every yr from these types of injuries? The last time i even heard of anyone being harmed was a copper thief who was killed when he cut into a live service with a hacksaw.

Has anyone noticed an increase in GFCI trip calls for foreign made devices/appliances? I got several calls this past summer for folks using laptops on their decks and tripping GFCI receptacles and GFCI breakers. Just had a call yesterday for a new coffee maker tripping any and all the kitchen GFCI's. It worked fine on non GFCI circuits. I recommended she take it back and try another.

More often than not when the inspector leaves AFCI circuits that power trouble appliance end up being taken out.


One place where I will gladly cheat AFCI requirements: fridges. Spoiled food and irate HOs, no way.



I havent noticed foriegn appliances tripping GFIs unless your talking about china. Of note, GFI around the world are usually set to trip at 30ma instead of 5ma, so that might explain it, I think.
 

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Head Grunt
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I often tell the HO that if the AFCI's are a problem they can remove them themselves or hire someone else to do it, i myself do not want the liability of removing them after inspection. Even my inspector thinks the NEC is getting a little overzealous with their requirements.
 

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The AFCI isnt really the big deal, Its the huge ass price increase for us on the breakers, that is cutting into profit.
How does afci equipment cut into profits? My markup is the same on regular breakers as afcis, so I actually end up with more money in my pocket, not less. Color me confused.

As far as afcis go, I don't even care anymore.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
How does afci equipment cut into profits? My markup is the same on regular breakers as afcis, so I actually end up with more money in my pocket, not less. Color me confused.

As far as afcis go, I don't even care anymore.
You bid on an old house rewire with permit, $6500 at 3 per standard breaker. Factor in AFCIs its 7,500 at $40 plus mark up. HO doesn't care or know about the code, neither does the guy who he can hire to do it for 6,000 or even less.

Who wins?
 

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felonious smile.
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How does afci equipment cut into profits? My markup is the same on regular breakers as afcis, so I actually end up with more money in my pocket, not less. Color me confused.

As far as afcis go, I don't even care anymore.
I won't and don't use afci junk unless it's a new build or permit job. I did make use of the nec book. A few pages became toilet paper .
 

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felonious smile.
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The real issue isn't the technology or it's costs

It's the fact that noneof it is going to mitigate the number one cause of electrical fires

Glowing connections.

~CS~
There is a real fine print on every afci breaker and receptacle. It reads.......for entertainment purposes only...
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
The real issue isn't the technology or it's costs

It's the fact that noneof it is going to mitigate the number one cause of electrical fires

Glowing connections.

~CS~
Exactly! Some of which are poor workmanship such as backstabbing.






I won't and don't use afci junk unless it's a new build or permit job. I did make use of the nec book. A few pages became toilet paper .There is a real fine print on every afci breaker and receptacle. It reads.......for entertainment purposes only...

:laughing::thumbup: Now your lucid. If only everyone could see it like that the NEC wouldn't be an advertising plat form.
 

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You bid on an old house rewire with permit, $6500 at 3 per standard breaker. Factor in AFCIs its 7,500 at $40 plus mark up. HO doesn't care or know about the code, neither does the guy who he can hire to do it for 6,000 or even less.

Who wins?
Me, cuz I don't have to deal with a cheap son of a b*tch. :whistling2:
 

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The real issue isn't the technology or it's costs

It's the fact that noneof it is going to mitigate the number one cause of electrical fires

Glowing connections.
Exactly, this AFCI supposedly mitigates an electrical fault that is both rare and very unlikely to even occur in premises wiring. Yet we keep getting sold the bill of goods that it will help prevent electrical fires. :rolleyes:

As for the GFCI expansion, I'm starting to have mixed feelings about it now. I trust a solidly connected EGC than I do a GFCI. I don't see the need for it especially with hardwired equipment. Grounded equipment is safe equipment. No need for GFCI paranoia.
 
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