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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am actually doing this service upgrade at my house. (Getting rid of my old OH setup) The city is requiring me to use a main breaker disconnect at the meter. The meter pedestal that the supplier send was the Milbank NU8980-O-200-KK. As soon as I opened it, it looked questionable. Now I don't know if I've been in commercial to long or what but this behemoth is a joke! So first I was checking for the grade line. (I know there is a line in back but NO labeling plus it threw all of the KO's WAY below siding which would require coring through the foundation! That doesn't seem right.) Checking the website...nothing. Here's a link. http://www.milbankworks.com/catalogs/ComEd.pdf

So I decided, against my better judgement, hey everything else is giving a grade of 18" so this must be too. WRONG! I found this link on a different suppliers website. http://www.ckelectricalsales.com/pdf_files/Milbank_Com_Ed.pdf . Oh no 36" really? Even the LP version is 24" and still throws the KO's WAY below any wood on the house. So you're expected to core through the foundation? Has anyone else ran into this problem and if so what was their way out?

I have, of course, already screwed everything up buy even attempting to use this. Already cut the siding (big mistake) so either way I'm screwed. I guess the positive is it's my house so I have only myself to blame.
 

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Those look like free-standing pedestals which are partially buried.

Commonly found in mobile home parks around here.

Why would one want one of those monstrocities mounted on their house??
 

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You received a free standing direct burial meter main.
Something is very wrong.

The unit on page 12 would be more like something you need.

What was the conversation like when you were procuring the meter?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The stipulation that my town had was it had to have and external disconnect. Fine no problem. The meter on 12 is for an overhead service only but MUCH closer to what I thought I was getting. I have installed these before, usually with out a main breaker, but I know I have used them before.

Page 22 shows what it normally looks like without the breaker. So the coversation with my supplier was. "I need a 200 amp underground meter pedestal with a disconnect." This is what they found. Called them up after opening this behemoth questioning...we'll everything. (Ones I've used before had no bottom, weren't that tall, didn't have to be buried that deep, didn't have a built in load center..etc.). They assured me that was the only main breaker/pedestal that Milbank offers. Not believing them I checked the website and found my link. After that I figured "well I guess it's ok". Should have listened to my gut. Still doesn't solve the problem though.
 

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OK, so the city requires an exterior disco. Does your power co. have a list of approved service equipment?

Are you trying to mount back to back with the house panel?

Your supply house thought you needed an UG "pedestal", but you should be able to build your own secondary pipe up to a normal meter main.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Ok so which one is needed then. I have always used the terminology pedestal when ordering and underground meter main. I still can find a 200 amp underground meter main with disconnect. That is the only one Milbank offers and square d offers without a disconnect.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The link from Milbank was all the ComED our power providers approved equipment but I will see if they have a list. Good idea.

The panel is mounted in the basement so it has to have a 90. So it isn't back to back.

I'm not sure I understand what you mean by build up to the meter main.
 

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The link from Milbank was all the ComED our power providers approved equipment but I will see if they have a list. Good idea.

The panel is mounted in the basement so it has to have a 90. So it isn't back to back.

I'm not sure I understand what you mean by build up to the meter main.
Well, you're building an underground service, so are you installing your UG secondary conduit from the primary pole to your meter?

Dig a ditch, run the secondary pipe, sch. 80 up to the meter main, sch. 80 pipe back down to an LB into the basement with your feeder to the house panel.

Also, if you can't find a meter main, you can build your own with a meter can nippled to a service rated switch or breaker.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Yea that makes sense. I also thought of using an external disconnect instead of worrying about the all in one. FYI I contacted Milbank and this is the only option they have for a residential solution. It's been the only one for a while. More municipalities out here are requiring the external disconnect. This may come up more and more.
 

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sirotz where are you in IL?
 

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You could do it the old fashioned way and just install a meter base with a 3R disconnect adjacent to it.


Edit: BTW, if you used the word "pedestal" with your supplier, you got what you ordered.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
3xdad- Those are nice but out here we aren't allowed to do pipe chases in residential here. (commercial no prob) It has to be part of the meter....I don't even know what to call it anymore. Pedestals are what ComEd wants for residential in the midwest. In fact a lot of the time when we did panel upgrades (years ago) we always had to re-do any underground service that entered the meter via conduit.

DH - about an hour north-west of chi-town.

Hardworking - yea the disconnect was what I was thinking and a pedestal is what I wanted. This is just a behemoth with terrible KO placement. If I was to go via grade it would run into the foundation. Thankfully after checking with the ComEd placing the meter higher than it's suggested grade still falls within their approved height

sbrn - ......
 

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Millbank makes an underground fed meter/main. I know cuz I've installed them. Maybe it's time to call an electrician. :laughing:
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Ok so an update for all that voiced their options. Inspector was perfectly fine with leaving the meter higher than the recommended grade. It's still within ComEd's meter specs so it stays.

He was taken back by the poor design of the meter as well. Many of the houses in this area are in flood plains and have a much higher foundation wall than normal. This would create problems for anyone that is required to use a main disconnect at the meter. (The whole thing is crap in my opinion. It's something that our service company recently implemented as required. Before it was a city code only. My city still follows 2003 code)

Milbank was helpful on the phone but didn't have any other options for this area. (There are TONS of other options if you aren't in this part of Illinois being serviced by ComEd.)

What would I do different if I were ever ran into this problem again? I would probably do the external disconnect next to a regular service meter. I would have to check to see if that would be approved by our service company but I don't see why it wouldn't. That would give way more options on where you could enter the residence. I keep thinking about what someone would do if they needed the panel on the first floor. It would look ridiculous having an LB off the side of the meter then up to the panel. I guess sometimes it's all about if it's functional not pretty.
 

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It would look ridiculous having an LB off the side of the meter then up to the panel. I guess sometimes it's all about if it's functional not pretty.
I've seen plenty of meters w/conduits going up, down, sideways.......
 

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Ok so an update for all that voiced their options. Inspector was perfectly fine with leaving the meter higher than the recommended grade. It's still within ComEd's meter specs so it stays.

He was taken back by the poor design of the meter as well. Many of the houses in this area are in flood plains and have a much higher foundation wall than normal. This would create problems for anyone that is required to use a main disconnect at the meter. (The whole thing is crap in my opinion. It's something that our service company recently implemented as required. Before it was a city code only. My city still follows 2003 code)

Milbank was helpful on the phone but didn't have any other options for this area. (There are TONS of other options if you aren't in this part of Illinois being serviced by ComEd.)

What would I do different if I were ever ran into this problem again? I would probably do the external disconnect next to a regular service meter. I would have to check to see if that would be approved by our service company but I don't see why it wouldn't. That would give way more options on where you could enter the residence. I keep thinking about what someone would do if they needed the panel on the first floor. It would look ridiculous having an LB off the side of the meter then up to the panel. I guess sometimes it's all about if it's functional not pretty.
Post some pics, man!
 
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