Electrician Talk banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
God-fearing Volt-head
Joined
·
1,221 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Would you install these? I wouldn't, and here is why:

  1. No place for grounding prong for three-prong cords
  2. Too easy for multiple line-line/neutral-neutral/line-neutral shorts, especially on the vertical runs
  3. Existing solutions to the problem it purports to solve without introducing new dangers (such as this squid outlet multiplier)
  4. Doesn't appear to be tamper-resistant

I cannot see this getting UL approval without at least a modification to add in a row for grounding prongs.

Thoughts?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
656 Posts
It also doesn't look like it's tamper-resistant, so even if it does get UL approval, you won't be able to install them anywhere in a residence, except high up on a wall.
 

·
God-fearing Volt-head
Joined
·
1,221 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It also doesn't look like it's tamper-resistant, so even if it does get UL approval, you won't be able to install them anywhere in a residence, except high up on a wall.
I didn't even catch that, I'll be adding it to my own list.
 

·
Donuts > Fried Eggs
Joined
·
17,042 Posts
I wonder about the pullout strength. Try to wiggle a two prong plug in a normal receptacle: The shape of the slots holds the blade pretty securely.

On those it looks like a plug could very easily pry loose if any force was put inline with the axis of those slots.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
261 Posts
Would you install these? I wouldn't, and here is why:

  1. No place for grounding prong for three-prong cords
  2. Too easy for multiple line-line/neutral-neutral/line-neutral shorts, especially on the vertical runs
  3. Existing solutions to the problem it purports to solve without introducing new dangers (such as this squid outlet multiplier)
  4. Doesn't appear to be tamper-resistant

I cannot see this getting UL approval without at least a modification to add in a row for grounding prongs.

Thoughts?
That's because it is for use in Japanese, not the US - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AC_power_plugs_and_sockets#JIS_C_8303.2C_Class_II_unearthed
 

·
God-fearing Volt-head
Joined
·
1,221 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
That may be, but the website I linked to seems to advocate users should try and purchase them if they can navigate the Japanese menus. I have no doubt that eventually we could see something like that making large in-roads in the U.S. It looks easy, it's stylish (in a minimalist sort of way) and adds a huge level of convenience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Years ago, power strips were a linear version of this. I remember a lamp store that had a few 1-foot strips above and below the window totally full of plugs. Of course, he had 7W bulbs in all the lamps so the load wasn't too high.

/mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
656 Posts
Years ago, power strips were a linear version of this. I remember a lamp store that had a few 1-foot strips above and below the window totally full of plugs. Of course, he had 7W bulbs in all the lamps so the load wasn't too high.

/mike
I still have one of those in my house. I wish I could say it's the worst part of my electrical system.
 

·
Electrical Simpleton
Joined
·
3,350 Posts
How does the fancy Japanese receptacle handle polarized cord ends? (I don't see how that design could).

Pete
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
In a polarized 1-15 plug, the difference in prong width is in line with the slots on that outlet. They should fit fine.
/mike
 

·
Electrical Simpleton
Joined
·
3,350 Posts
In a polarized 1-15 plug, the difference in prong width is in line with the slots on that outlet. They should fit fine.
/mike
"Fitting fine" is the issue... What is in place to make sure that a polarized plug cannot be installed in a fashion in which the polarity would be reversed?

Pete
 

·
God-fearing Volt-head
Joined
·
1,221 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
"Fitting fine" is the issue... What is in place to make sure that a polarized plug cannot be installed in a fashion in which the polarity would be reversed?

Pete
I don't see how polarity is an issue in A/C motors, honestly. Even with the cord going to a rectifier pack (such as on my laptop) A/C polarity is a non-issue. FWIW, the cord on my charge cord for my laptop is non-polarized.

I've never really understood the need for polarized cords, honestly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
261 Posts
I don't see how polarity is an issue in A/C motors, honestly. Even with the cord going to a rectifier pack (such as on my laptop) A/C polarity is a non-issue. FWIW, the cord on my charge cord for my laptop is non-polarized.

I've never really understood the need for polarized cords, honestly.
It sure will if the ground ever becomes faulty now you have an energized chassis and a shock hazard.
 

·
God-fearing Volt-head
Joined
·
1,221 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
It sure will if the ground ever becomes faulty now you have an energized chassis and a shock hazard.
I understand the need for a hot line and a neutral line in the power system, but in the cord itself? Pointless.

Edit: If the neutral part of the cord is somehow bonded to the chassis, I could see the point then, but then why not just use a three-prong cord and be done with it? Wasn't that part of the impetus for dryers going to a four-wire cord (e.g. separating the neutral and ground prongs)?

Also, energized chassis only applies if contact surfaces are metal (such as with my toaster oven). If the chassis of my laptop ever gets energized, I have bigger problems then a faulty ground.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
261 Posts
I understand the need for a hot line and a neutral line in the power system, but in the cord itself? Pointless.

Edit: If the neutral part of the cord is somehow bonded to the chassis, I could see the point then, but then why not just use a three-prong cord and be done with it? Wasn't that part of the impetus for dryers going to a four-wire cord (e.g. separating the neutral and ground prongs)?
3 Prong does provide more protection, but that still doesn't change the fact that if the ground is lost a shock hazard is present.

Also, energized chassis only applies if contact surfaces are metal (such as with my toaster oven). If the chassis of my laptop ever gets energized, I have bigger problems then a faulty ground.
This is why you have polarized and non-polarized plugs, I'll be honest I can't remember the last time I saw anything but polarized. Oh and not all laptop's are made of plastic.
If the potential for a safety issue exist's that is all that really matter's. And as long as the Edison screw is in place it's not far-fetched that a child could get hurt.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top