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How's offshore oil rig electrical work?

  • It's going to be awesome!

    Votes: 4 20.0%
  • It's going to suck!

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  • I have no idea

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  • Have fun!

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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Not sure if this belongs here or somewhere else.

Hey all, I've been in the trade about 6-7 years. Doing residential, commercial and industrial. I'm leaving soon to go work on an offshore oil rig. Does anyone know much about this job? Moving from electrical company to electrical company I know roughly what the deal is with the work. It might vary some but typically it's something I can look back and say "yeh I've done this or something similar to this before" However, I don't have any idea what to expect working on an offshore oil rig. Anyone here have any insight as to the daily grind for this work? And most importantly, how often do offshore rig sparks get raises? I'm used to working for small companies that hardly ever give raises. I'd imagine large scale companies with thousands of employees might open their budget a little more.

Any insight at all on this topic? Anything is appreciated! :)
 

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12 hour days for 2 or 3 weeks straight without interruption, then you're off for 2 or 3 weeks. Pay is probably above 80K for a trade job, while anyone with an unlimited tonnage Coast Guard engineers license is looking at pay above 100K or more, for 6 months worth of work. Of course the downside is that you're away for all that time when you're working.

The rigs themselves are diesel-electric and use a European 11,000 volt distribution system. They are like small floating cities and everything is taken care of for you - meals, laundry, toiletries, etc. All you do is show up for work.
 

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Chairman of the Bored
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I would welcome the opportunity if I was younger: great money, nothing to worry about except myself...seems like a great way to work your ass off for several years, live like a pauper and sock some serious cash away (or gold bullion).
 

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Forgot to mention that the company you work for handles all the travel requirements, which I'm told is the most stressful part of the job. You can live anywhere in the country because you will be flown to the Gulf Coast, usually New Orleans, where you will stay at a hotel overnight with everyone else going on the rig, then very early the next morning you will bussed to the staging area where you will be flown to the rigs in helicopters. The lamer companies use crew boats to bring the workers to the rigs which I've heard is awful compared to being on a chopper.
 

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Fluke Skywalker
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MTW said:
Forgot to mention that the company you work for handles all the travel requirements, which I'm told is the most stressful part of the job. You can live anywhere in the country because you will be flown to the Gulf Coast, usually New Orleans, where you will stay at a hotel overnight with everyone else going on the rig, then very early the next morning you will bussed to the staging area where you will be flown to the rigs in helicopters. The lamer companies use crew boats to bring the workers to the rigs which I've heard is awful compared to being on a chopper.
That's about how it goes.

You just left out the possibility of **** hitting the fan and you make it ok but you are floating in the ocean now.
 

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NJ Electrical Contractor
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Not sure if this belongs here or somewhere else.

Hey all, I've been in the trade about 6-7 years. Doing residential, commercial and industrial. I'm leaving soon to go work on an offshore oil rig. Does anyone know much about this job? Moving from electrical company to electrical company I know roughly what the deal is with the work. It might vary some but typically it's something I can look back and say "yeh I've done this or something similar to this before" However, I don't have any idea what to expect working on an offshore oil rig. Anyone here have any insight as to the daily grind for this work? And most importantly, how often do offshore rig sparks get raises? I'm used to working for small companies that hardly ever give raises. I'd imagine large scale companies with thousands of employees might open their budget a little more.

Any insight at all on this topic? Anything is appreciated! :)
How did you managed to land this awesome gig?:jester:
 

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NJ Electrical Contractor
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324 Posts
Not sure if this belongs here or somewhere else.

Hey all, I've been in the trade about 6-7 years. Doing residential, commercial and industrial. I'm leaving soon to go work on an offshore oil rig. Does anyone know much about this job? Moving from electrical company to electrical company I know roughly what the deal is with the work. It might vary some but typically it's something I can look back and say "yeh I've done this or something similar to this before" However, I don't have any idea what to expect working on an offshore oil rig. Anyone here have any insight as to the daily grind for this work? And most importantly, how often do offshore rig sparks get raises? I'm used to working for small companies that hardly ever give raises. I'd imagine large scale companies with thousands of employees might open their budget a little more.

Any insight at all on this topic? Anything is appreciated! :)
LOL I quoted the wrong guy:blink:, How did you landed this job. :thumbup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
LOL I quoted the wrong guy:blink:, How did you landed this job. :thumbup:
Ive got an Uncle in the Oil industry. He pointed my resume in the right direction. I am non-union as well. I would guess that the rig workers are Union? I leave in 2 days. Looking forward to the new opportunity. :)
 

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Electrical Simpleton
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Ive got an Uncle in the Oil industry. He pointed my resume in the right direction. I am non-union as well. I would guess that the rig workers are Union? I leave in 2 days. Looking forward to the new opportunity. :)
If you can check in and give us updates.:thumbsup:

Pete
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
If you can check in and give us updates.:thumbsup:

Pete
Ill check in and tell you all about my expierence. Ill be in training for a little over a week. So first update on actual work will be in 2 weeks or so. If they have wifi out there that is :eek:
 

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Ive got an Uncle in the Oil industry. He pointed my resume in the right direction. I am non-union as well. I would guess that the rig workers are Union? I leave in 2 days. Looking forward to the new opportunity. :)


They did not want you to get a Underwater Helicopter Evac Card ? They might require it to board the Chopper .

Back in the 70's ...They liked to see Ac & Heat Skills also . You do it all .




Pete
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
They did not want you to get a Underwater Helicopter Evac Card ? They might require it to board the Chopper .

Back in the 70's ...They liked to see Ac & Heat Skills also . You do it all .

Pete
I believe the evac card is part of the training. I leave in 2 days for training then after that to start on the rig. Im sure ill learn a lot. Hopefully there is some control and plc type stuff out there. Id like to learn that too
 

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I believe the evac card is part of the training. I leave in 2 days for training then after that to start on the rig. Im sure ill learn a lot. Hopefully there is some control and plc type stuff out there. Id like to learn that too
Which drilling company are you working for?
 

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The rigs themselves are diesel-electric and use a European 11,000 volt distribution system. They are like small floating cities and everything is taken care of for you - meals, laundry, toiletries, etc. All you do is show up for work.

Did you ever work on them?
 

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Did you ever work on them?
No, I just went to maritime academy for a year and a lot of my former classmates from that school are now working in the offshore drilling industry making well over 100K a year, while I'm twisting wire nuts. :jester:
 
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