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a friend of mine at watthour meters .com could tell ya. i've readabout them but don't remember any of the details , except it was the fore runner of the modern watthour meter.:)
 

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You holding out on the picture of the inside ? > ;)

I'll reckon a coil...

I bet you could find the road map for that! Ok the Patent!
 

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cog
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Discussion Starter #7








Oh......and I had to try this one. Saskatoon berry Beer?:blink: Pretty good actually :thumbsup:

 

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cog
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The bulb is filled with some yellow fluid, in which is also contained a blob of mercury. Anyone know how this thing worked? I'm gonna do some research later. The guy who owns it could not find much on it, though not for lack of trying.

Apparently, a small globule of mercury was pushed up the scale as power was consumed.......
 

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Good Man

I accounted for the coil, forgot about the a\switch!

Good Stuff, Old School! Cool - Thanks
 

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electricity_meter


An early type of electrochemical meter used in the United Kingdom was the 'Reason' meter. This consisted of a vertically mounted glass structure with a mercury reservoir at the top of the meter. As current was drawn from the supply, electrochemical action transferred the mercury to the bottom of the column. Like all other DC meters, it recorded ampere-hours. Once the mercury pool was exhausted, the meter became an open circuit. It was therefore necessary for the consumer to pay for a further supply of electricity, whereupon, the supplier's agent would unlock the meter from its mounting and invert it restoring the mercury to the reservoir and the supply.
 

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cog
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Discussion Starter #14
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electricity_meter


An early type of electrochemical meter used in the United Kingdom was the 'Reason' meter. This consisted of a vertically mounted glass structure with a mercury reservoir at the top of the meter. As current was drawn from the supply, electrochemical action transferred the mercury to the bottom of the column. Like all other DC meters, it recorded ampere-hours. Once the mercury pool was exhausted, the meter became an open circuit. It was therefore necessary for the consumer to pay for a further supply of electricity, whereupon, the supplier's agent would unlock the meter from its mounting and invert it restoring the mercury to the reservoir and the supply.
Thanks! I would really like to know more about the 'how this works' part of the electromechanical action.
 

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Thanks! I would really like to know more about the 'how this works' part of the electromechanical action.
Maybe like the process of electroplating? I see a coil at the bottom. I never would have guessed that it also shut the power off. Send another nickel in dear. :laughing:
 

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cog
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Maybe like the process of electroplating? I see a coil at the bottom. I never would have guessed that it also shut the power off. Send another nickel in dear. :laughing:
I think that is just a retainer spring. The article said the mercury conducted the customers current, and when it ran out, the circuit was open, requiring the meter man to come out and flip the vial up to refill the bulb....
 

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cog
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Discussion Starter #19
It looks like a coil in the back with the wide black conductors going to it. Why didn't you just buy it ya tightass Canadian. :jester: :laughing:
:laughing::laughing: but, but, how will I afford my berry beer???
 
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