Electrician Talk banner
41 - 60 of 64 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,508 Posts
I’ve noticed a bunch of you guys have posted about your extra curricular hobbies (bowling, skateboarding, ect) adding to your soreness.

While I get that we need to take care of our bodies, don’t you think that out hobbies and recreational activities are an important thing in our lives? Imagine not having bowled for all those 35 years….maybe your shoulder wouldn’t be so sore, but imagine all the fun times you had with your friends and family.
 

·
Registered
Scada Supervisor
Joined
·
3,784 Posts
I’ve noticed a bunch of you guys have posted about your extra curricular hobbies (bowling, skateboarding, ect) adding to your soreness.

While I get that we need to take care of our bodies, don’t you think that out hobbies and recreational activities are an important thing in our lives? Imagine not having bowled for all those 35 years….maybe your shoulder wouldn’t be so sore, but imagine all the fun times you had with your friends and family.
"Life's to short have fun first."
 
  • Like
Reactions: MHElectric

·
Registered
Electrical Contractor
Joined
·
3,062 Posts
Have any of you guys stayed on any type of exercise/work out routine over the years?
I exercise my pointer finger on beer can tabs every Friday after work. Finger still feels like it's 30yo....... :p
 

·
Hackenschmidt
Joined
·
12,212 Posts
I’ve noticed a bunch of you guys have posted about your extra curricular hobbies (bowling, skateboarding, ect) adding to your soreness.

While I get that we need to take care of our bodies, don’t you think that out hobbies and recreational activities are an important thing in our lives? Imagine not having bowled for all those 35 years….maybe your shoulder wouldn’t be so sore, but imagine all the fun times you had with your friends and family.
For me it was actually backward, I decided to give up the extracirriculars because they were taking too much of a toll on the body. I could see the hand writing on the wall, I was going to destroy my body long before I was done using it.

Luckily although I am a slow learner, I do learn. I learned a good deal dinging myself in sports about how to be more injury resistant and where to draw the line so that having fun doesn't mean having surgery.

Have any of you guys stayed on any type of exercise/work out routine over the years?
I kind of do, for me if I am working hard just a very little bit of exercise is necessary.
 

·
Registered
Install, troubleshoot, maintain, and upgrade electrical systems, plant utilities, PLC's, mechanical
Joined
·
493 Posts
Have any of you guys stayed on any type of exercise/work out routine over the years?
After a back injury, compressed three disks, I got up to 250 pounds.
I would stop at a local park and walk about two miles on Mondays and Wednesdays, then on Fridays I would do about five miles.
Got down to 205 and felt a whole bunch better.
Then got put on night shift and couldn't keep up the routine.

The only other exercise (if you can call it that) is pulling the lever on a reloading press, which can take some "umph" on some cartridges.

Left out a few other health issues.

Can't do any running due to shin splints from running cross country and track during junior and senior high school, so walking is about all I can do.
This was before high impact running shoes and softer track materials.
Also on the swim team during that time, which is probably the one sport that is actually good for you, low impact with cardio.

Often during my lunch break I'll walk a lap or two around the building at work, 1/4 mile per lap. Usually two laps.

Hearing loss from ear infections while working as an aquatics instructor in Boy Scout summer camps and not wearing hearing protection on jobs.
Again before hearing protection was required in certain high noise areas.

It helps when I can see people's lips as they talk, but all this mask business put the kabash on that.
Wear hearing aids around the house, but can't wear them at work because they amplify the already loud noise.
Need to find some similar to what I use at the gun range, can talk and hear others with the protection on and it cancels anything over 100db.

Diagnosed with osteoarthritis about 15 years ago, which affects every joint in your body.
One of those things where the medication is not good for your liver, but you have to decide whether to be in pain when you move, or beat up your liver.

Had to have surgery on my foot due to plantar fasciitis, because as a young apprentice I did not wear the proper boots while working on hard concrete floors.
Being a Native born Texican I, of course, wore cowboy boots.
Not good for your arches.

Type 2 diabetes so I have to watch (not very closely I'll admit) what I eat and when.
If I eat a small snack every 4 hours I can keep the blood sugar under control.


So...about the only thing that still functions as designed, without pain, is the ol' brain.
I try to pass as much knowledge as I can to coworkers before the brain starts having issues.
Taught electrical classes at a local college for about 10 years and plan to go back to teaching when I finally "retire" from the physical part of electricity.
Have "senior" moments, as most will.

Not much you can do about some of these things, as aging is part of life.
Don't deny myself the pleasures of good food, my favorite adult beverages, or any of my other favorite activities.

Dad passed at 89 and 10 months, Mom is alive around at 90 but has dementia and alzheimer's.
Good chance I'll make it to an age close to theirs due to heritage.

To you young guy's, live your life to it's fullest because no one gets out alive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
339 Posts
Discussion Starter · #49 ·
I believe if you are a Master of your trade, you have an obligation to continuously train others in your craft. With that said, you should always be on the lookout for a young person that might be interested in your trade. It doesn't need to be steady but, inviting someone along and paying them $20 per hour, even for a half day, might be enough to pique their interest in persuing a apprentiship or, helping them decide to enter a professional career. The worst thing that could happen is that a young person learns a trade where they can feed themselves and family with their knowledge and a few tools.
Best wishes
I agree with you 100%! ...But I'm not sure I'm the best person for this because of the way that I work.
I do teach a little on my own and with a guy I know who has a course for training electricians (he also teaches the master electrician code course). It's obviously really useful for his students to work with him and another electrician to gain skills as well as perspectives.
---And this is so important because a lot of young guys think that it's all about the NEC. Yet most of the troubleshooting I do has to do with technique rather than book knowledge---
At this point, I work an inconsistent schedule, so I can't really offer anyone full time employment. Sometimes I work weekends or evenings, sometimes I take days off. I'll work 12 hours straight if it's an emergency, but usually I do 2 hours of morning paperwork and 4-6 hours of Labor -so I'm not a very good source of income for anyone.
 

·
Old Grumpy Bastard
GOV/MIL contracting
Joined
·
61,984 Posts
Have any of you guys stayed on any type of exercise/work out routine over the years?
Even at my worst medical state I swam as much as possible. When I had a hard time walking I was still agile in the water. I still spend as much time as possible in and underwater.
 

·
Old Grumpy Bastard
GOV/MIL contracting
Joined
·
61,984 Posts
2011-2017 I was close to a chair bound invalid and on oxygen 2013-2017. I have been taking a bunch of supplements and find they do help with many issues. I got off of statins and other meds after a short time with these supplements. Here's my list:

Omega-3 2000 mg
Ceylon cinnamon 1200 mg
Echinacea and goldenseal 900 mg
L-Arginine 500 mg
Alpha lipoic acid 200 mg
Green tea 500 mg
Turmeric curcumin 1000 mg
Apple cider vinegar 450 mg
Maca 500 mg
Vitamin C 500 mg
Acidophilus
Super vitamin B complex
CoQ10 200 mg
L-Carnitine 500 mg
B12 500 mg
Lutein 20 mg
Ginkgo biloba 200 mg
Niacin 1500 mg
Selenium 200 mg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,803 Posts
I believe if you are a Master of your trade, you have an obligation to continuously train others in your craft. With that said, you should always be on the lookout for a young person that might be interested in your trade. It doesn't need to be steady but, inviting someone along and paying them $20 per hour, even for a half day, might be enough to pique their interest in persuing a apprentiship or, helping them decide to enter a professional career. The worst thing that could happen is that a young person learns a trade where they can feed themselves and family with their knowledge and a few tools.
Best wishes
I trained a son and daughter. Son went on to be a cop, he had no passion for electrical. Daughter became an electrician, but now is into management. After that I came to the conclusion that paying someone else to learn the trade was not for me. If I was a college professor, kids would pay to take my classes. But because I’m a master electrician, I have to pay someone to teach them. No thanks, I’m taking all my knowledge and experience to the grave.
 

·
Registered
Engages in the design, construction, maintenance, repair and support of most major electrical system
Joined
·
10 Posts
Hey, maybe you're not so old ...maybe you have an injury or early arthritis?

Here's my situation: I'm very successful doing resi work in close proximity to my home.
I'm 60, still love this job, love old houses, love meeting new customers. I'm booking months in advance despite limiting what I do and where I go.
My business model is that I do all the work, customers get my cell number, I do really personal customer relations, and all my labor is guaranteed forever. So I'm not crazy about hiring a helper. (I used to run a crew of 3-4 guys and my job became being a "manager" -boring).

However, I really should stop doing 200Amp services and hanging ceiling fans. It's not that I "can't", but it's taking a long time -and my hands, shoulders, back might ache for a few days. The last few 200 amp services, my arms feel numb the next day(s). My hands hurt, making a fist is difficult.

I don't need to do these jobs, but I'm wondering how 'normal' this is at 60?

Also, what should I say to customers? I don't know if they will care or not, but I don't want to get that reputation for being "too" old. I definitely don't want to sound weak. We're supposed to be hardy, manly men ...and I feel like a F'ing wimp. Wah.

I'm just starting to write responses to requests -and I don't want to message: "Hey, I'll do blah, blah for $XXXXX, buuuut ...you'll have to find someone else to hang that fan because I'm and ancient and decrepit old man".

When did you stop doing some of whatever you do?
And how did you tell your customers?
I cannot answer that one but GD i loved reading that you guarantee the labor for life. AMEN, I have been putting that in writing for years. And while most of those clients say its respectable, many have asked me why. i say why not, does everyone else think their work is faulty and won't last the test of time? Because a solid well designed and installed quality electrical system will work as intended for many years if not forever.

Damn right you pay me top dollar for a top dollar service and I will stand by that until I can no longer stand.
 

·
Can't Remember
Joined
·
10,202 Posts
I just finished an addition for a family. At the end, the mother came to me and said her son was interested in becoming an electrician and I spent some time with both explaining how to get in, how many hours it takes, classes, etc. Seems like a good kid, football player in his senior year at a local Catholic high school. I may have him help on some weekends to see what its like and if its truly something he's interested in. I'll try to get him some contacts because I know a quite a few other contractors. When summer rolls around it should be fairly easy to find someone who'll take him on.
 

·
neutral member
ELECTRICIAN!!!
Joined
·
1,954 Posts
I just turned 68 so not an old guy yet, just 2 more years tho . . .

It was easy to price myself out of new work, nowadays mostly by-the-hour and small jobs and service calls

I don't turn many jobs down, just keep raising price and working slower, so now I don't have to work as much but make more money
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,508 Posts
More $ per hour and less hours is good.
Judging from most of your posts, it sounds like at some point in your career, you decided to move towards specializing in generators and do less regular electrical stuff. Care to elaborate on this?
 

·
Can't Remember
Joined
·
10,202 Posts
I have plenty of regular electrical customers, property management too, who I don’t worry about not getting paid from. The generator thing took on a life of it’s of its own. It’s all word of mouth too. I try to take care of legacy customers that I like. The generator thing right now is out of control, no advertising required. I do the best I can to take care of fellow contractors, but it’s tough to make it all happen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,508 Posts
The generator thing right now is out of control, no advertising required.
This would be nice. Some type of niche to fall into that was enjoyable. Maybe not 100% of your work load but enough that you were steady busy with it.

I can see this being a really good route as you get older and are less inclined to get involved with the strenuous labor jobs.
 
41 - 60 of 64 Posts
Top