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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
That is GREAT. I like those old 4 cyl generators. If you ever need info on it, here is a link.

http://www.smokstak.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=6

Consider bringing it to a local old engine show.

Frank
Thanks, I was really drawn to the engine when I first saw it. Later found out that it's a Contenential Red Seal. I can get the idle so slow that you can count the fan revolutions and the magneto clutch will click in.

It's actually a backup generator for a generator so even though it was made in 1961 it never saw much use. Mechanically it's like new but the outside is beat to crap. I spent a lot of hours hammering on panels so everything would close up properly but didn't have to do much on the inside.
 

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That's awesome, I bet that thing is an absolute work-horse. Now all you need is to drum-switch the stator leads so you can automatically change your voltage and phase-configurations.

You come by it at an auction?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
View attachment 32531

I love this old stuff. So elegantly clean and un-cluttered. Very cool. :thumbsup:
Yep, it's rare to see this nice craftmanship these days. That shorting busbar is how you set the generator up for the differents outputs. You can see the unused bars bottom center of the control panel picture in my first post. They are clamped down to a cover.




 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
That's awesome, I bet that thing is an absolute work-horse. Now all you need is to drum-switch the stator leads so you can automatically change your voltage and phase-configurations.

You come by it at an auction?
Oh sorry, see my response to stuiec. Craigslist purchase. The last thing I did before offering money was look in the radiator cap. My heart sank when I saw a thick film of oil floating on top. So I bought it at a much reduced price knowing almost 100% that it had a cracked block or some sort of serious problem. Come to find out that the military puts that crap in the coolant systems to prevent corrosion so all was well.

It was not running either because the guy threw out the nice stainless plug wires and replaced them with standard rubber ones. They were just shoved into the magneto but they were a larger diameter and not going all the way in to the contacts in the bottom. The whole time he was telling me the generator just had a fuel filter problem. :blink:
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
That's awesome, I bet that thing is an absolute work-horse. Now all you need is to drum-switch the stator leads so you can automatically change your voltage and phase-configurations.

You come by it at an auction?
I wonder how this, possibly derated for the military, 12.5kw continuous duty generator compares to present day generators? Is the advertised power of home generators continuous duty? A drum switch would be nice but the shorting bars make it pretty easy to change around in a pinch. It also has an impressive amount of filtering on the generator output.

Here is a pic of another same model generator to give an idea of the size.

 

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I wonder how this, possibly derated for the military, 12.5kw continuous duty generator compares to present day generators? Is the advertised power of home generators continuous duty? A drum switch would be nice but the shorting bars make it pretty easy to change around in a pinch. It also has an impressive amount of filtering on the generator output.
I have a 1947 Kohler that I take to engine shows. and a 1960 something Onan The differences between these and a modern big box store are amazing. First the old generators ran at 1800 RPM not 3600
Second the old ones had a 4 cylinder engine (The onan is 2 cyl)

My Kohler has a 4 cyl engine and develops about 3 hp (1200 watts) It contains 9 qts of oil, is water cooled. It was designed to serve as the only power source for a home or farm (Not a backup) and appears to have been designed for a service life of forever.

AND it is automatic start (senses a load and starts, remove the load and it stops.)

http://www.oldengine.org/members/frank/kohler1.htm

 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I have a 1947 Kohler that I take to engine shows. and a 1960 something Onan The differences between these and a modern big box store are amazing. First the old generators ran at 1800 RPM not 3600
Second the old ones had a 4 cylinder engine (The onan is 2 cyl)

My Kohler has a 4 cyl engine and develops about 3 hp (1200 watts) It contains 9 qts of oil, is water cooled. It was designed to serve as the only power source for a home or farm (Not a backup) and appears to have been designed for a service life of forever.

AND it is automatic start (senses a load and starts, remove the load and it stops.)

http://www.oldengine.org/members/frank/kohler1.htm
Wow....neat stuff! I go to a local show every year and really enjoy it.

I wasn't clear but I was mainly wondering about the duty cycle of larger permanent generators for home backup, Generac's etc.... Just curious if mine would handle about 15 or 17kw intermittant.

I can't remember the engine model, maybe F168? But it's the largest F with IIRC ~30-35 hp.
 

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I pretwist and then use wire nuts. Solder pots rule.
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8V71 said:
That's a new one for me too. :001_unsure:
I think its a 55/55 setup.
Good for amphibious operations and field use.
Don't quote me, it's been to many years since I saw that.
 

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I had a friend that bought one like that, ONLY problem with it was it was 400hz.
He thought he got a good deal.
 
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