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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone just wanted to introduce myself. My names Justin and I am 24. I was previously accepted into the local jatc program in 2008 however the list was frozen a couple slots before I was going to be hired. I went I a different direction after that. I studied electronic energy and took some electrical circuits analysis class. I had to drop out once my daughter was born. My plan is to go on Wednesday and apply at the electricians union ibec. I feel fairly comfortable taking the aptitude test but my concern is even if I do well how many people are they going to need to hire? What kind of state is Oregon electrician work in right now? Any tips or suggestion for the aptitude test are still welcomed.
 

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Where do you live? Which JATC are you applying at?
 

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Electron Flow Consultant
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There is a lot of union work right now. It would be a good time to be an apprentice. For the last several months they have been putting 15-20 apprentices out each month. They had over 800 applicants last time. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
There is a lot of union work right now. It would be a good time to be an apprentice. For the last several months they have been putting 15-20 apprentices out each month. They had over 800 applicants last time. Good luck.
Jeez I didn't realize that many people applied. Once you test and interview will you be told your ranking? Hopefully I do well thanks for responding sparky.
 

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Electron Flow Consultant
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You'll test first. If you do good on the test they will give you an interview. If you get past the interview, then you get ranked. If you aren't in the top 120 or so, it would be unlikely you would go to work before they hire again. At the point, depending on he candidates, you could get bumped down the list again. FYI, doing well on the interview will put you much higher in the rankings. This is where you really need to sell yourself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You'll test first. If you do good on the test they will give you an interview. If you get past the interview, then you get ranked. If you aren't in the top 120 or so, it would be unlikely you would go to work before they hire again. At the point, depending on he candidates, you could get bumped down the list again. FYI, doing well on the interview will put you much higher in the rankings. This is where you really need to sell yourself.
Ok thanks for breaking it down for me. Any suggestions for the interview? I don't have much job related experience other then some electrical circuits analysis college classes. I've done smaller scale construction work and building. Any help is greatly appreciated.
 

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Electron Flow Consultant
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Ok thanks for breaking it down for me. Any suggestions for the interview? I don't have much job related experience other then some electrical circuits analysis college classes. I've done smaller scale construction work and building. Any help is greatly appreciated.
You want to give the committee a reason to chose you. Ambition, passion for the trade, wanting a career, not just a job, goals. Anything to build yourself up. If/when you get asked to interview, talk to the apprenticeship director, she could offer tips on what they are looking for.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
You want to give the committee a reason to chose you. Ambition, passion for the trade, wanting a career, not just a job, goals. Anything to build yourself up. If/when you get asked to interview, talk to the apprenticeship director, she could offer tips on what they are looking for.
You just explained my real goals when it comes to becoming an electrician. I'm looking for a career to take care of my young family at the same time getting involved in something I truly enjoy will be a positive. If I get hired on I don't plan on going anywhere. This is my career move :). Hopefully they will get that from talking to me. Going to apply to the union and the jatc program to double my chances of getting hired.

How much does not having any field related job experience affect their decision?
 

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Electron Flow Consultant
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You just explained my real goals when it comes to becoming an electrician. I'm looking for a career to take care of my young family at the same time getting involved in something I truly enjoy will be a positive. If I get hired on I don't plan on going anywhere. This is my career move :). Hopefully they will get that from talking to me. Going to apply to the union and the jatc program to double my chances of getting hired.

How much does not having any field related job experience affect their decision?
Plenty of people get to the interview stage with zero experience. The interview is where you need to shine. I have a material handler whos grandpa was our locals president and a dad who is a long time member. Myself and a couple others wrote letters of recommendation and I spoke with the director a couple times. He did great on the test and just OK on the interview. He was 140 on the list. It sucks because he really is a smart kid and knew quite a bit for a greenhorn, but he didn't do good enough at the interview. He is almost at his 1000hrs as a material handler, then he can request another interview. Like I said you have to sell yourself and image is important.
 

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spaghetti slayer
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Here's the recipe for getting in.

Apply for both.

Get accepted and start in the non-union program.
After a couple years in the non-union program, you will have a high enough score in the union ranking to get in.
Then you will be accepted into the union program, and they will give you credit for some of your non-union experience. After all is said and done, you will have over 10,000 hours, but you will have the experiences from both programs, so you will be better than most electricians from both groups.

Just sayin, the guy who is good, is the one who goes out and jumps into it any way he can, he doesn't wait around fiddle funking to get into the union program. Problem is that minorities and relatives will always pinch the line you are in and get into the class you should have been in to start with. When you are non-union, you can quit your contractor and go to work for anyone you want to, this is very advantageous over the union program.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Plenty of people get to the interview stage with zero experience. The interview is where you need to shine. I have a material handler whos grandpa was our locals president and a dad who is a long time member. Myself and a couple others wrote letters of recommendation and I spoke with the director a couple times. He did great on the test and just OK on the interview. He was 140 on the list. It sucks because he really is a smart kid and knew quite a bit for a greenhorn, but he didn't do good enough at the interview. He is almost at his 1000hrs as a material handler, then he can request another interview. Like I said you have to sell yourself and image is important.
Thanks for the advice man I appreciate it
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Here's the recipe for getting in. Apply for both. Get accepted and start in the non-union program. After a couple years in the non-union program, you will have a high enough score in the union ranking to get in. Then you will be accepted into the union program, and they will give you credit for some of your non-union experience. After all is said and done, you will have over 10,000 hours, but you will have the experiences from both programs, so you will be better than most electricians from both groups. Just sayin, the guy who is good, is the one who goes out and jumps into it any way he can, he doesn't wait around fiddle funking to get into the union program. Problem is that minorities and relatives will always pinch the line you are in and get into the class you should have been in to start with. When you are non-union, you can quit your contractor and go to work for anyone you want to, this is very advantageous over the union program.
Yeah that is my plan :). Which ever one takes me first I will go to work. I applied at the jatc program in 08 and was down to 3rd on the list an I got the letter saying they froze the list. Since then I have 20 more math and electrical related classes to bump me up the list. Hopefully.

Should I turn anything else in with my application?
This is my list so far:
High school and college transcripts
Letters of reccomendation (2 so far). More?
References
Resume

I have a 9 month old daughter and a soon to be wife. I currently work security and want to start a career to support my family in the log run.
 

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Yeah that is my plan :). Which ever one takes me first I will go to work. I applied at the jatc program in 08 and was down to 3rd on the list an I got the letter saying they froze the list.
I went in with the same plan and got lucky. now on my 3rd year as a ibew apprentice. looking back I am so glad I was given that chance. as far as the schooling goes....I have nothing positive to say about it. BUT, the on the job experience working with the best is priceless.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Did you put in your application?
I'm having to wait an extra week to get letters of recommendation from my current employer. So next week I'll be applying for sure just want to make sure I have everything together before hand.
 

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THE "BIG RED MACHINE"
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apply at some of the local electrical motor shop, Electrical Contractors, donate some time at your local Habitat for Humanity to get residential experience. take some electric electrician classes at your local Junior College, don't just sit around and wait for the Union
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
apply at some of the local electrical motor shop, Electrical Contractors, donate some time at your local Habitat for Humanity to get residential experience. take some electric electrician classes at your local Junior College, don't just sit around and wait for the Union
All solid advice well see how my first application process goes and I'll go from there. Habitat for humanity sounds like a good experience. I'm applying for the none union program as well.
 
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