Electrician Talk banner
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey Guys,
I see that in the past there has been a lot talk about work over seas. Does anyone have the scoop as to what the work scene is like now? I thought It might be and adventurous way to make some good money.
 

·
animal lover /rat bastard
Joined
·
13,547 Posts
life is an adventure.

Unfortunately, in a lot of places americans might as well have targets on their backs. If you don't think you can blend in, you might not want to gamble your life on it.

Otherwise, go for it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Majewski

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
LOL, Thanks. Yeah I'm as white as it gets I wont blend in. Just its a good time in my life. I'm healthy, I'm divorced and thought it might be "fun" for a year or two. I'm a journeyman electrician with my California C-10 license, why not.
 

·
Old Grumpy Bastard
GOV/MIL contracting
Joined
·
62,072 Posts
LOL, Thanks. Yeah I'm as white as it gets I wont blend in. Just its a good time in my life. I'm healthy, I'm divorced and thought it might be "fun" for a year or two. I'm a journeyman electrician with my California C-10 license, why not.
If you can't pass for Mediterranean could you pass for say Irish? Just kidding, sort of. I've worked OCONTUS and enjoyed it in the past. Look online for jobs and stay current with the scams going around.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,752 Posts
Hey Guys,
I see that in the past there has been a lot talk about work over seas. Does anyone have the scoop as to what the work scene is like now? I thought It might be and adventurous way to make some good money.
There is just no end to the calls you can hop in out there right now. It's a good time to work in the US.
Usually, overseas is a last resort.
If you have extensive industrial experience, you might be able to transition out of the field and into a superintendent or PM job. Those are always out there and pay well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
I have worked in India, Bangladesh, and Pakistan. Great experience, but I was working for an American company. Seeing the culture was good for a young man. I was about 20-23 and that was the late 80's early 90's things have certainly changed at least in India. Wife and I were there to visit friends 3 years ago the poverty seemed to be a lot less.
 

·
Senile Member
I make all the electrons line up for their Flu shots
Joined
·
33,810 Posts
The one for Honolulu looks kinda good for him. It's sorta like foreign country lite if you get my drift. Sort of a starter introduction to life overseas, and especially if you live on the west side of Oahu instead of the East side with all the rich haoles like me............. If you get culture shock from this place you will definitely not like it overseas anywhere else.......
 

·
Old Grumpy Bastard
GOV/MIL contracting
Joined
·
62,072 Posts
The one for Honolulu looks kinda good for him. It's sorta like foreign country lite if you get my drift. Sort of a starter introduction to life overseas, and especially if you live on the west side of Oahu instead of the East side with all the rich haoles like me............. If you get culture shock from this place you will definitely not like it overseas anywhere else.......
I'll add that Dean is an excellent employer. :thumbsup::thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,469 Posts
I'd recommend:

Australia
New Zealand
England
Ireland
Canada
British Honduras

With luck, you'll master the local language.

Most other safe spaces won't tolerate imported talent.

The other UN-safe spaces will ( no joke ) take your tools away from you when you leave. Yes it's a universal policy in the Third World to NEVER let your tools leave their country.

Betcha didn't know about that, did you ?

The euphemism is "export controls."

Export controls usually includes CASH, too.

If you really want to be altruistic -- join the Peace Corps. It's ALWAYS hard up for tradesmen. Do-gooders it has aplenty. Skilled souls, it has not.

The typical Peace Corps volunteer is a 'secular preacher' -- with no transferable skills whatsoever. It's all feel-good with no practical results -- other than shocking the American as to how backward and resistant Third World H holes really are.

By now, the stories are legion.

BTW, the average IQ on this planet is 85 not 100.

No wonder the Peace Corps didn't pan out, per the advertising.
 

·
Old Grumpy Bastard
GOV/MIL contracting
Joined
·
62,072 Posts
I'd recommend:

Australia
New Zealand
England
Ireland
Canada
British Honduras

With luck, you'll master the local language.

Most other safe spaces won't tolerate imported talent.

The other UN-safe spaces will ( no joke ) take your tools away from you when you leave. Yes it's a universal policy in the Third World to NEVER let your tools leave their country.

Betcha didn't know about that, did you ?

The euphemism is "export controls."

Export controls usually includes CASH, too.

If you really want to be altruistic -- join the Peace Corps. It's ALWAYS hard up for tradesmen. Do-gooders it has aplenty. Skilled souls, it has not.

The typical Peace Corps volunteer is a 'secular preacher' -- with no transferable skills whatsoever. It's all feel-good with no practical results -- other than shocking the American as to how backward and resistant Third World H holes really are.

By now, the stories are legion.

BTW, the average IQ on this planet is 85 not 100.

No wonder the Peace Corps didn't pan out, per the advertising.
Australian is hard to master, Maori is not too hard. British is a muck in another fer pasture. Ireland one just needs to speak beer!

You ship your toolbag out the week before you leave.

Cash you transfer into your own Visa account.

I wasn't able to get my pistol out of Germany.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
I don't mean to high jack this topic. However, I feel if I start a new overseas topic not many people will reply. I have a few questions about overseas work as a "Journeymen Wireman" I am looking into applying for an apprenticeship.

1. As a JW how easy is it to get overseas electrician work? What is the best path to take?
2. What is the pay scale normally?
3. Is there normally overtime? Is it time and a half or double time?
4. What are your options for contract length? 12month, 6month etc?
5. Are you given free room and board? or are you on your own? If you are on your own do they give you extra pay for these things? How much?
6. Taxes: How much tax do you pay? Is all your income tax exempt? Or maybe just a fraction of your income tax exempt? how does this work?

Thank you for any help.
 

·
Safety Pin Member
Joined
·
2,255 Posts
I've known electricians who worked for oil companies in South America.
They liked it. Personally I wouldn't work for a company that takes advantage
of the poverty and poor government of these nations to destroy the land and
water and run rough shod over locals who try to speak put.
YMMV
P&L
 
  • Like
Reactions: TGGT and Majewski

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
I've recently had this small fascination of learning the trade in Germany and learning to speak more of it there....and drink some beer hahaha
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Australian is hard to master, Maori is not too hard. British is a muck in another fer pasture. Ireland one just needs to speak beer!

You ship your toolbag out the week before you leave.

Cash you transfer into your own Visa account.

I wasn't able to get my pistol out of Germany.
I'd like to hear more about your trip to Deutschland
 

·
Old Grumpy Bastard
GOV/MIL contracting
Joined
·
62,072 Posts
I'd like to hear more about your trip to Deutschland
I've done several electrical retro fit jobs in Germany, mostly airport / military work.. Enjoyed all aspects of German life. Had I had some vision for future career choices I'd have stayed.
 
  • Like
Reactions: splatz

·
Registered
Joined
·
469 Posts
life is an adventure.

Unfortunately, in a lot of places americans might as well have targets on their backs. If you don't think you can blend in, you might not want to gamble your life on it.

Otherwise, go for it.
That's not good
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,149 Posts
I don't mean to high jack this topic. However, I feel if I start a new overseas topic not many people will reply. I have a few questions about overseas work as a "Journeymen Wireman" I am looking into applying for an apprenticeship.

1. As a JW how easy is it to get overseas electrician work? What is the best path to take?
2. What is the pay scale normally?
3. Is there normally overtime? Is it time and a half or double time?
4. What are your options for contract length? 12month, 6month etc?
5. Are you given free room and board? or are you on your own? If you are on your own do they give you extra pay for these things? How much?
6. Taxes: How much tax do you pay? Is all your income tax exempt? Or maybe just a fraction of your income tax exempt? how does this work?

Thank you for any help.
If your talking war zone:

1. Just like everywhere else it's supply and demand. Years ago when the US construction market was strong it was easy to get in, seemed like many that couldn't hack the local market. Kinda like carnival electricians. At the peak of the 2 wars, surge, and a number of electrocutions, was a huge demand for electricians. 2010 General McCrystal wanted all the base electrical systems code correct and safe to avoid more casualties. At the time there was little jobs in the US. Lots of electricians went there. There wasn't enough capacity for housing, dining, laundry, bunkers, buses, etc. Many got housed in double bunk 100+ men tents with people from all over the world.

By 2012 the politicians were cutting military funding, abandoning bases that had many construction improvements the few years before. Forces were cut. Then it seemed like there was more equipment and guard towers then people to man them. IMO that's when it was more dangerous. US soldiers were replaced with paid security from 3rd national countries, and paid very little.

I would say 2014 or 2015 most of the electricians there finished.

There is always work there. Just not much of it now. They have very few US troops in Iraq & Afghanistan now. It could all change with a new military plan, or other significant event.

There was always government requirements to travel to a war zone.
You need to pass a full physical with blood work, vision, hearing, dental, TB, drug test, prostate exams. Have a cholesterol, weight, BMI, and other numbers in there range. Certain diseases, prescriptions, or medical issues would disqualify. Then you get a full round of shots from flu to anthrax.

Most needed at least secret clearance. Full FBI background check of them contacting people about you. Need your entire life history of names, places, birth dates, birth places, etc.. Your criminal background needs to be disclosed and explained.

They all want a journeyman, master, or EC license. Some areas not accepted if it's considered too easy to take the test. With x years experience and references double checked.

The problem now is there are so many with experience in war zones and so few jobs the companies have raised their criteria. I seen ads last year wanting people that worked for a certain contractor there before, 3+ years experience in a war zone, veterans, have current secret or Top Secret clearance, supervisor experience in a war zone, etc. Making it seem hard to break in to that work.

2. The pay is a complicated formula. Just know this. The base pay rate is on the low side for the US. While processing and training in the US you'll earn the base rate and perdium. On the way there to be in Kuwait or UAE your making a nice perdium but it's not the real money. Even if your sitting on a plane for 20 hours you get paid 8 per day. Last year they had a number of people going to those places, staging for the call to go in the war zone. But most would not be happy with the waiting pay. War zone pay is where it's at. Between hazard and war zone pay you would get 1.8 x you base pay. That still don't sound like much, see #3.

3. Most companies pay 7-12's. That's 84 hours / week. No overtime pay. Some companies pay the 1.8 hazard pay on all 84 hours others only pay it on 44 hours. There is other bonuses and money to be had depending on the company. The recruiter will normally quote you a yearly or bi-weekly amount you make. Be ready to work every day for months. Not many of the trades work all 12 hours they're paid everyday, but when called to you must.

4. For trades it's almost always 12 month contracts. Unless it's a small company that has a small project. You can quit anytime. But you would also loose bonuses. Lot of people don't return after your R&R. US people get an R&R every 3-4 months depending on company. For about 21 days unpaid time. Travel time includes your time to and from the other side of the world. When you return the bonus is like vacation time. Another company banked vacation pay based on working hours.

5. Hotels, planes, & rental cars is paid by the company or you and reimbursed. You get perdiem. On a base you will be provided with a bunk, bunk mate, tent / container / hanger/ plywood hut, and maybe a locker. Tents are temperature controlled to a point. Summer days they can be 100+ and winters it can be 15 degrees. The HVAC systems are inefficient, sometimes non working, and buildings uninstalled. Tents leak water on you, can't keep out the sandstorms and provide little protection from shrapnel or blasts.

Dining is like a buffet. Not a good one. Most of the times it's all you can eat, with a few premium items restricted. Some DEFACTs will have steak and lobster on Fridays. With a wide rage of foods and deserts. Other bases may not have any hot food. With shortages on everything. They will give you a choice of you MRE (meal in a box made to last forever). Not good. At that point you start asking to locals if they got anything to eat. For $1 they may get you their version of chili or pizza. It's not bad, just don't watch them cook, you'll loose your appetite.

6. Taxes you have the option of no taxes taken out of your check, or some. The rule is if your in another country all year your exempt from federal taxes. They will let you be in the US for for about 30 days a year, and pro rate your income. After that you need to pay like you made it in the US. They have some tight rules as far as your still counted in the US until you spend the 1st full day elsewhere. SS you only have to pay on the 1st about $90k you earn. The amount changes every year.

There is no apprentices in war zones. They hire 3rd country nationals and locals for that type of work.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top