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Salary range is fine. Did i read it wrong that all pay is now essentially public information? Maybe i need to read it more carefully but it looked like each employee's pay is public info, but an applicant's prior pay is somehow protected? The article seemed biased so i had a hard time reading it carefully.
 

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Hackenschmidt
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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
I posted it when I saw it because it was something I never heard of but it's an interesting idea.

I always figure that regulation is more likely to cause headaches and do no good and possibly make things worse. That's how it usually works. So I am very hesitant to think any kind of law would help.

One thing that I notice is that the current situation gives the employer all the negotiating advantages. One is asking you your current pay. I don't think there would be anything wrong with declining to answer that question. Of course you'd worry that the employer would then just toss your application in the trash and keep looking. I don't think I see a thing wrong with a law that makes it illegal to ask an applicant what their current pay is. They don't really need to know. It's simple privacy.

But then doesn't the reasonable expectation of privacy extend past the hiring process? Or shouldn't it at least be legal that my employer not share my pay with the rest of the company? I am of the opinion that HR departments are the slipperiest, most duplicitous people in larger corporations and they'll find a way to obfuscate despite what the rules say. So I don't like the idea of a law that requires posting everyone's pay.

There is this common idea that it's somehow bad workplace etiquette to talk about pay too soon in the hiring process. This is actually more of a thing in the corporate / cubicle world than the trades but it's still there. I always thought it gives further negotiating advantage to the employer. They try to hide the real pay as long as possible. Advertising jobs with vague BS like "pay commensurate with experience" or giving ridiculously broad ranges, or advertising pay higher than they're ever going to offer. It wastes a lot of time, why bother interviewing if you're so far apart on pay it will never happen? Well, time is something the people doing the hiring at larger companies don't mind wasting - they aren't the ones taking a day off for the interview! So "pay transparency" is a fancy term for it, but if it helps break this etiquette, it saves time and makes the takes back some of the negotiating advantage from the big company.
 

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Ready Mix concrete plant electrician
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I posted it when I saw it because it was something I never heard of but it's an interesting idea.

I always figure that regulation is more likely to cause headaches and do no good and possibly make things worse. That's how it usually works. So I am very hesitant to think any kind of law would help.

One thing that I notice is that the current situation gives the employer all the negotiating advantages. One is asking you your current pay. I don't think there would be anything wrong with declining to answer that question. Of course you'd worry that the employer would then just toss your application in the trash and keep looking. I don't think I see a thing wrong with a law that makes it illegal to ask an applicant what their current pay is. They don't really need to know. It's simple privacy.

But then doesn't the reasonable expectation of privacy extend past the hiring process? Or shouldn't it at least be legal that my employer not share my pay with the rest of the company? I am of the opinion that HR departments are the slipperiest, most duplicitous people in larger corporations and they'll find a way to obfuscate despite what the rules say. So I don't like the idea of a law that requires posting everyone's pay.

There is this common idea that it's somehow bad workplace etiquette to talk about pay too soon in the hiring process. This is actually more of a thing in the corporate / cubicle world than the trades but it's still there. I always thought it gives further negotiating advantage to the employer. They try to hide the real pay as long as possible. Advertising jobs with vague BS like "pay commensurate with experience" or giving ridiculously broad ranges, or advertising pay higher than they're ever going to offer. It wastes a lot of time, why bother interviewing if you're so far apart on pay it will never happen? Well, time is something the people doing the hiring at larger companies don't mind wasting - they aren't the ones taking a day off for the interview! So "pay transparency" is a fancy term for it, but if it helps break this etiquette, it saves time and makes the takes back some of the negotiating advantage from the big company.
I’ve truncated a few interviews with hiring managers and one job acceptance with HR and the Union labor-management rep. The last one, the HR lady was all over everything but pay. I halted the monologue and stated in simple terms, what’s the per hour rate? When I was told $16 and some small change on straight midnight turn, I politely said that’s not enough and anything further talk was a waste of my time and theirs. I thanked them and left.
 

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I was referred to a local EC for employment. I called and talked to him. One of his FIRST questions to me was how much I wanted. I told him that when I am in CA I get 40ish or more easily. I told him FL is less as we both know.
He wanted a number. I told him my number and he told me that was more than he earns. I told him that I do not know any rough carpenters, finish carpenters, plumbers, or cabinet installers earning less than the number I quoted him for my wage and that generally, electricians earn more than rough carpenters.
This guy actually thought that he could hire an electrician for under 20 an hour. Really? I told him that if he is really earning less than what I quoted as my desired wage, he needs to hang up his license and go to work for someone else.
I have owned several companies over the years, and it does NO harm to tell applicants the range for a specific job's rate of pay. In fact it can help, especially if that range includes an advancement plan. Better working conditions (and knowing wage range is a working condition) create longer term employment which benefits the employer.
 

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But then doesn't the reasonable expectation of privacy extend past the hiring process? Or shouldn't it at least be legal that my employer not share my pay with the rest of the company? I am of the opinion that HR departments are the slipperiest, most duplicitous people in larger corporations and they'll find a way to obfuscate despite what the rules say. So I don't like the idea of a law that requires posting everyone's pay.
Agreed! Except maybe a close second to the corporate lawyers. :)
 
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