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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Any guys from 11 and 441 mins sharing a picture of your pay stub?
I’m curious of the take home.
I was told 11 gets vacation taken off the top of the taxable rate and will drag the take home down to lower than non union shops.
 

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Scada Supervisor
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I was told 11 gets vacation taken off the top of the taxable rate and will drag the take home down to lower than non union shops.
This is something that a lot of people don't understand. I am hiring now non union, and just my sick, vacation, holiday and 401k matching adds $10-12 per hour to rates.
 

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Power distribution and controls
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Your state has a website where the withholding tax tables are posted.
 

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36th year apprentice & Floor Sweeper
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Most vacation funds are 3 to 5% of your gross wages. It might be easier to find out what theirs is and deduct that. Are the wages between union and non union that close?

You should be saving 10%. So take away another 5 to 10% with an automatic reoccurring bank transfer and forget it’s there. Live off the rest.
 

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Its a case of 'pay you now or pay you later'.

When your vacation/stats are paid out as a % on every cheque, you go unpaid for the stats and 2 weeks vacation you're off work. Once you do your taxes, should get a refund.

f you don't take your vacation time, then yes - you are getting taxed appropriately for the extra % you earned all year.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Its a case of 'pay you now or pay you later'.

When your vacation/stats are paid out as a % on every cheque, you go unpaid for the stats and 2 weeks vacation you're off work. Once you do your taxes, should get a refund.

f you don't take your vacation time, then yes - you are getting taxed appropriately for the extra % you earned all year.
I’m fine with paying/allocation. Maybe a better way to ask is, is the vacation percent of the benefits paid along with benefits (untaxed) or with my taxable rate(after benefits)
So for example easy numbers 100$/hr total package, 75$ taxable rate/take home pay 25$ benefits (retirement, medical, training trust, ect. ).
What comes out of taxable rate vs benefits?
 

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Pretty sure it's all taxable except the 401k (if it's like a Canuck RRSP - a tax deferral) I specifically have a 'taxable benefits' section on my year-end stub. (I'm not IBEW.)
 

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36th year apprentice & Floor Sweeper
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As far as I know the pensions, annuity, and the health care, are all un-taxed as far as income. I’m sure there’s plenty of tax on some of them though. Like some of the money towards healthcare goes to the affordable health care act. Some of the pension money goes to guaranteeing the plan with a federal insurance plan. Some of your annuity money will go to managing the plan etc…Because the money is un-taxed as far as income, there are caps as to how much you can contribute for retirement.

To hopefully answer you question though, the vacation fund comes out after taxes, because it’s income, whether you spend it or not. The amount is based on the gross income if they are using percentages. In other words our plans are based on percentages. This way you don’t have to vote where the money goes for each raise. There are times it will have to go to a vote. Let’s say to keep the health care or pension afloat. Then they will raise or reallocate the percentages. I’m not sure if every local is like that?

Our vacation fund is also by percentages, and we have a suplimental fund that is un-taxed. The supplemental fund is different than vacation. It’s more of a blend of a health savings account, and a Flexible spending account. HSA’s and FSA’s have different rules. You get a debit card and you can use it on anything health related. Everything from tampons to copays, to whatever the health plan doesn’t cover. . Black market kidneys might be hard hide? The money rolls over every year like an HSA, but we don’t have high deductibles or high co-pays that are required for an HSA. You also use it to pay for your health care coverage if you want to retire early, or if you didn’t hit the hours worked need to keep you in the plan. Many guys complain that there’s too much money in their account and they can’t get to it. But none the less, they just voted to raise the percentage. I’m not looking forward to the day I have to wipe that fund out!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
As far as I know the pensions, annuity, and the health care, are all un-taxed as far as income. I’m sure there’s plenty of tax on some of them though. Like some of the money towards healthcare goes to the affordable health care act. Some of the pension money goes to guaranteeing the plan with a federal insurance plan. Some of your annuity money will go to managing the plan etc…Because the money is un-taxed as far as income, there are caps as to how much you can contribute for retirement.

To hopefully answer you question though, the vacation fund comes out after taxes, because it’s income, whether you spend it or not. The amount is based on the gross income if they are using percentages. In other words our plans are based on percentages. This way you don’t have to vote where the money goes for each raise. There are times it will have to go to a vote. Let’s say to keep the health care or pension afloat. Then they will raise or reallocate the percentages. I’m not sure if every local is like that?

Our vacation fund is also by percentages, and we have a suplimental fund that is un-taxed. The supplemental fund is different than vacation. It’s more of a blend of a health savings account, and a Flexible spending account. HSA’s and FSA’s have different rules. You get a debit card and you can use it on anything health related. Everything from tampons to copays, to whatever the health plan doesn’t cover. . Black market kidneys might be hard hide? The money rolls over every year like an HSA, but we don’t have high deductibles or high co-pays that are required for an HSA. You also use it to pay for your health care coverage if you want to retire early, or if you didn’t hit the hours worked need to keep you in the plan. Many guys complain that there’s too much money in their account and they can’t get to it. But none the less, they just voted to raise the percentage. I’m not looking forward to the day I have to wipe that fund out!
Thanks, that does clarify a bit.
I’m looking to see if my take home goes down or not because my wife doesn’t work and you know the age old story of budgets and housing and feeding kids.
Any local 11 or 441 journeyman willing to send me a pic of your pay stub?
 
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