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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Purely a question out of general curiosity, I cant say I've seen many larger feeder taps let alone done one. Polaris lugs? Bolt on insulated distribution blocks? split bolts and 4 rolls of tape....? Some product I've never heard of because I'm not in the construction side of the field ?
 

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I’ve seen/ done all of the above.
What the hell is the question?
Your asking us if your in the field or not?


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Well I generally roll old school and use Kearneys [split bolts] to do a tap on wires in troughs. The job is time consuming though.
Tighten- pretty self explanatory.
Tap- rap on the Kearney with a hammer a few times and it will be loose again. Repeat until it stays tight.
Tape- cambric first or a back wrap of jap-wrap, then a good layer of 130C, then a nice layer of 1755 friction tape.
I'm certainly living in Truman's 50's doing it this way, but I have good success like this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm just wondering what the prefered method is for those that do this frequently.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I was mostly interested in terms of inside boxes or gutter etc, always interested in learning other stuff and know very little about overhead and underground things so that would be interesting to. Hey 460 I've been known to lace wires vs use zip ties so I'm ok with old school.
 

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My method depends on if I plan on it being permanent or semi permanent
 

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I was mostly interested in terms of inside boxes or gutter etc, always interested in learning other stuff and know very little about overhead and underground things so that would be interesting to. Hey 460 I've been known to lace wires vs use zip ties so I'm ok with old school.
Typical commercial work, we use Polaris taps.
For butt splices, we crimp and heat shrink them.
 

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Bilge Rat
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Just wrap the small wire around the big one a few times and tape it up real good...........

I do it the same way that 460 does. Never had a problem.

The key is to wiggle, tap, etc. until you can't tighten the kearney anymore. This can take a few minutes but I think it's worth it.
 

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Chief Flunky
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Split bolts were designed for this task but you’re really not supposed to tap just anywhere, and I’ve seen a lot of failures of all kinds of hodge podge taps in troughs that then destroys a lot more cables and is very hard to sort out the mess.

Tap rules are very important because if you are say tapping a #1 off a 350 MCM cable the protection for the 350 does nothing for the #1.

I’d say 99% of the time though except for overhead lines using saddles, Squeeze one, and other lineman taps on bare overhead lines, it’s best and cheap to use lugs, power distribution blocks, DIN rail terminals, or Polaris taps where all 3 cables terminate together.

The worst size changes I see are inside control panels. Incoming may be rated 200+ A but the control power transformer may be a paltry 2 A. The easiest way is I keep some #14 ring lugs in hand with 3/8”, 1/2”, and 5/8” holes. Just slip them over a stud with the main power lugs.
 

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Purely a question out of general curiosity, I cant say I've seen many larger feeder taps let alone done one. Polaris lugs? Bolt on insulated distribution blocks? split bolts and 4 rolls of tape....? Some product I've never heard of because I'm not in the construction side of the field ?
In my area the larger taps I inspect are typically done with Polaris taps or distribution blocks. I do see the rare bussed wireway as well. I cant recall the last time I saw a tap done with split bolts. Seems most have gotten away from the old school split bolt due to the time involved to install correctly, The failure rate due to faulty install, and the ease of better methods
 

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In my area the larger taps I inspect are typically done with Polaris taps or distribution blocks. I do see the rare bussed wireway as well. I cant recall the last time I saw a tap done with split bolts. Seems most have gotten away from the old school split bolt due to the time involved to install correctly, The failure rate due to faulty install, and the ease of better methods
Some of the larger Polaris taps are not UL Listed, but if you are inspecting anything we do I'll scratch in UL for you. NO JUST KIDDING
 

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Well I generally roll old school and use Kearneys [split bolts] to do a tap on wires in troughs. The job is time consuming though.
Tighten- pretty self explanatory.
Tap- rap on the Kearney with a hammer a few times and it will be loose again. Repeat until it stays tight.
Tape- cambric first or a back wrap of jap-wrap, then a good layer of 130C, then a nice layer of 1755 friction tape.
I'm certainly living in Truman's 50's doing it this way, but I have good success like this.
Wow. I didn’t know it was that involved with split bolts. I’ve always just tightened them as hard as you could with 2 pairs of channel locks and then wrapped it with about 4-5 layers of tape.
 

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Wow. I didn’t know it was that involved with split bolts. I’ve always just tightened them as hard as you could with 2 pairs of channel locks and then wrapped it with about 4-5 layers of tape.
I’m generally using bigger sizes doing my thing, usually like a 3/0 or 4/0 size. The banging on them is key to getting them tight. The cambric or a back wrap is if you ever want to disassemble it and not spend hours cutting loose vulcanized rubber from the Kearney. The friction layer is because r-mix plants vibrate and friction tape will outlast 33+ by a mile when it’s rubbing on a trough lid.
 

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Kupl-Taps are a godsend for working in old gutters where there is no room to wrap a roll of tape around the wire.
 

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I’m with MHElectric on this one… never knew there was a better way to tighten a split bolt.

Maybe a stupid question, but literally just whack on the bolt a bit to shake it loose? I’ve always just tightened them down as tight as possible.
 

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I’m with MHElectric on this one… never knew there was a better way to tighten a split bolt.

Maybe a stupid question, but literally just whack on the bolt a bit to shake it loose? I’ve always just tightened them down as tight as possible.
Yeah, nothing really complicated about it. I carry a 8oz ball pein in my service bag, and a hit on the end and maybe a hit or two on the nut is my method. What you're doing is settling the wire strands so they are meshing or laying together and not just stacked on each other.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Yeah, nothing really complicated about it. I carry a 8oz ball pein in my service bag, and a hit on the end and maybe a hit or two on the nut is my method. What you're doing is settling the wire strands so they are meshing or laying together and not just stacked on each other.
This right here is about the one reason that I haven't completely quit the internet all together. Little nuggets of information that make all the difference and have been learned through experience being passed along. Especially helpful to poeple like me who dont neccesarily get to work directly with a lot of experienced poeple. On a side note I thought electricians weren't allowed hammers, I thought that's what linemans were for....
 
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