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This is my new tempole i just set up 06/06/22. And inspector left note that “service disconnect”
Can anyone help me correct this pole?
Thank a lot
Best regard
You gotta have a single main effective with the 2020.
Iowa granted an small extension to continue using the old temp services.
But all the new stuff needs the main.
Install a NEMA 3R (outdoor) breaker panel with a main breaker.
QO or Homeline 100a, 12s runs around 135-140/e at the big box stores.

Better yet, if you just use a meter/main such as the Milbank product, you have your meter socket, main breaker, and eight spaces all in one box. Few boxes mean lower install labor.
 

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This is a temp pole for new construction. It is not a service disconnect, so rules for a disconnect ahead of the panel don't apply. At least where I'm at they don't. This is exactly how I/we set up temp poles (except for the goofy bracing). Just a meterbase, small panel, riser, weatherhead, grounding system (ground rod). Or, if you can find them, a temp box that has the breaker spaces and receptacles made in them, also a meterbase that goes on top.
I'm also at a loss as to what the inspector is talking about unless he/she is talking about the service disconnect that goes on the building at the service. This is not a main service, it is a temp service.
Well . . . .
That was never true.
The six-means or less rule allowed no main disconnect.
The six motions or less of the hand was the main disconnect.
And the six motions of the hand option was removed in the 2020.
 

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Unless in 6 separate enclosures, I think?
YES, that is true.
Milbank's 400-amp meter-main was designed such that each 200-amp main breaker is within a separate enclosure within the same box.
And the type of install that used service conductor taps (maybe in a wireway or trough or junction box) to feed multiple meter enclosures and main disconnects is also still allowed up to six disconnects as well.
 

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Well . . . .
That was never true.
The six-means or less rule allowed no main disconnect.
The six motions or less of the hand was the main disconnect.
And the six motions of the hand option was removed in the 2020.
Maybe not where you're at, but temp poles here are set up and treated just as I described. I don't get applying the new 2020 rule for a disconnect ahead of the service to a temp pole/service. The disconnect is mainly for the fire department to shut off all the power. You don't exactly need to have the fire department for a temp service. It's usually one or two workers plugging in their tools. You're not powering a house!
 

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Maybe not where you're at, but temp poles here are set up and treated just as I described. I don't get applying the new 2020 rule for a disconnect ahead of the service to a temp pole/service. The disconnect is mainly for the fire department to shut off all the power. You don't exactly need to have the fire department for a temp service. It's usually one or two workers plugging in their tools. You're not powering a house!
Since when did common sense override the "rules"? :)

You must be a PMA guy (Positive Mental Attitude).
 

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As wired your MLO panel does not conform to 230.85, which requires an emergency disconnecting means which shuts off the service in a single throw (edit: correction you can have up to 6 throws but they must be grouped). You can do what Tom suggested, you can also install an OCPD ahead of the MLO panel, or you can swap out your MLO panel for a main breaker panel. In any case you're going to rework your installation anyways so just do whatever makes sense with the materials you can find.

230.85 Emergency Disconnects. For one- and two-family dwelling units,

And we stop reading 230.85 right there.
This is a temporary service, not a dwelling unit service
 

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In order to do a service ONE TIME, whether a permanent or temporary it is best to look up your current utility specifications and follow them, instead of waiting for the suspector to tell you it's wrong, or worse yet asking online from people outside of your area. Each utility and municipality can have differing requirements, it's always best to determine the requirements up front, before you buy any materials and waste time and money. Charge the customer for the research time, instead of you eating the time and materials for something that won't pass or get connected.

Here is a couple snippets from my local utility's greenbook for an example. Notice that the verbiage says to follow Article 230. That means there is no special allowances for temporary services as suggested earlier in this thread. Whatever code cycle your area has adopted needs to be followed, not what some guy on the internet say's. If your still unclear on the local requirements, it would be smart to stop in and ask your local suspector directly or the service planner if the field conditions are different from their specifications. Once you know the actual requirements, then you should pass the first time and every time thereafter with no waste of time or materials. And charge the customer for your knowledge, because that is what it takes to get the job done efficiently.

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In order to do a service ONE TIME, whether a permanent or temporary it is best to look up your current utility specifications and follow them, instead of waiting for the suspector to tell you it's wrong, or worse yet asking online from people outside of your area. Each utility and municipality can have differing requirements, it's always best to determine the requirements up front, before you buy any materials and waste time and money. Charge the customer for the research time, instead of you eating the time and materials for something that won't pass or get connected.

Here is a couple snippets from my local utility's greenbook for an example. Notice that the verbiage says to follow Article 230. That means there is no special allowances for temporary services as suggested earlier in this thread. Whatever code cycle your area has adopted needs to be followed, not what some guy on the internet say's. If your still unclear on the local requirements, it would be smart to stop in and ask your local suspector directly or the service planner if the field conditions are different from their specifications. Once you know the actual requirements, then you should pass the first time and every time thereafter with no waste of time or materials. And charge the customer for your knowledge, because that is what it takes to get the job done efficiently.

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View attachment 166094
Very good fact based comment. Your utility has a "green" book? We have a utility " red" book but it really gray in color. Maybe we should partition for a code change and call it a gray book.
 

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This is my new tempole i just set up 06/06/22. And inspector left note that “service disconnect”
Can anyone help me correct this pole?
Thank a lot
Best regard
If they adopted the 2020, you have to have a single main or a separate main.

 
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