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I am at my wits end here.

Empty house. New owner is a flipper so no one to talk to about the history of the house or electrical system. Old panel was a 200 divided main disconnect. Was full with several double taps so I advised the owner to switch it out to a main breaker 40 space. I went through tripping circuits to lable everything and then removed the old and installed the new. Put AFCI breakers in the bedroom circuits and the correct breakers for everything.

Replaced the double 10awg runs to the hvac system to the correct 6awg wire and the helper was suppose to add a 4 wire tombstone to the stove wire. He told me he was finished but he forgot about adding the outlet.

I turn on the main and the stove breaker trips. So I turn the main off, reset the stove breaker and turn the main back on. This time I get a loud buzzing and after a second I manually open the main. I run up to the kitchen to find the stove wires stripped back and all touching. I separate them and go back to the panel. I open the stove breaker and close the main. All appears good.

Now there are three circuits in the panel that I need to identify. So I start going through light switches and what not to short them out. My tic tells me there is proximity voltage but when I try to short them hot to neutral I get a tiny spark and that's it. I go back to the panel to see what's tripped and the AFCI breakers have tripped.

Two AFCI breaker that turn out to be on the same leg as the circuit I was trying to trip tripped... But the breaker for the circuit I was shorting did not trip. So I removed the ACFIs from the panel as I already had those circuits traced. I go back to that first switch to try to trip is again, this time I take my vom with me. I check it across the hot and neutral for voltage. I get 119.

I then open a different switch next to it in a different box and different circuit. I tested across the first hot and the new neutral and still got 119 volts. So I go back to the panel and shut everything off except one breaker at a time until I identify the breaker this circuit is on. I ohm out the line to make sure it isn't a splice and it ohms out fine. So I reconnect it.

I turn breakers back on and go to a different circuit. Outlets this time. I know what breaker this is on, so I short the outlet with a jumper, but I also have an outlet tester in the outlet. The tester shows it is connected correctly until I short it, then the testers lights go dark, but as soon as I remove the jumper the lights come back on.

Real close to going bald now.... Not just on one circuit... So I go back to the panel. I connect a jumper to a 15a breaker and install to the right leg. I test the voltage between the jumper and the panel case as the case is bonded to the neutral and the house earth. It reads 124. So I measure between the jumper and the neutral bus; 124. Jumper and the neutral feeder wire.; 124 volts. So I take the jumper and touch the case, nothing. The neutral bus, nothing. The neutral feeder, nothing. I then add another 15a breaker to the left leg with a jumper and to leg to leg and I get spark and both breakers trip. Measuring across both legs I get 240 volts and the trip was what I was hoping for.

In all of this I am getting the neutral from the meter is open. I am measuring 120 on each leg because of the house earth, but because the neutral is not working it will not short the breakers into an overload.

Is this what you are getting? What is my next step? I can't open the meter can because there is a lock on it... Do I call the power company and get them to check for a open neutral on their side?

What I really don't get is that the neutral appeared to be working with the previous panel. I was able to trip the breakers no problem. Now the neutral is open as it appears.

I have never run into something like this before.
 

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I hope your insurance is paid up!!

Are you an electrician??

Pretty dumb to admit that you have shorted hot to hot and hot to neutral as a way to finding the breaker.
I almost asked that the first time I read that post bt I was hesitant I thought maybe its ok in the part of the world he comes from thanks for putting it straight.

Sent from my HUAWEI Y210-0100 using Tapatalk 2
 

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hey friend that's not a good way of troubleshooting shorting hot and neutral
you might cause injury to yourself and the house wiring might seriously be damaged.I thought they teach this in school

Sent from my HUAWEI Y210-0100 using Tapatalk 2
 

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A good way to make sure a breaker won't ever trip again is to short it out like that. I can't really make heads or tails out of your post, but one sure way to check for an open neutral is to shut off all breakers except for a single 120 volt load and clamp your meter on the service neutral and check for current
 

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To the OP:

First off, I edited your post to make it easier to read.

Second, you are in way over your head and need to get your Master Electrician to help you out..and teach you better work methods.

NEVER, EVER short out ANYTHING in the course of troubleshooting or circuit tracing. Not only is it dangerous, but you can easily start fires or create a fault condition that may not get cleared by fuses or breakers. There is also the arc flash hazard.

The problem appears to be an open service neutral. Check all connections, and if all connections on your side are good, then contact the POCO to check things on their end.
 

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I like ceiling fans & EMT
Former commercial, occasional (small) residential
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I was taught to short to ground to find the breaker . . . I dont do it much any more. I have seen one breaker go bad from being shorted repeatedly.
 
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