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Old Grumpy Bastard
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Quality Control Inspector (at a brothel) is the position that I always wanted to retire into.
 

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I do fire alarm work. After 24 years doing electrical distribution work in the plant It is a real change. Not making the money I was in the plant but it is nice not working behind a chain link fence and not going through the same gate every day. I just work part time but now we have a lot of work. I tell everyone that I am on the extra board.

LC
 

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QC Design Review for an engineering firm, electrical designer, estimator, electrical survey work for engineering firm, utility coordination

Lots of jobs in the design, construction admin field that people don;t know about
 

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Hackenschmidt
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I'll probably just be a model.
 
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I always dreamed of becoming a Wallymart greeter in my golden years. The prestige would be so totally awesome. I would wear my cool little blue vest everywhere, like when I shop at Target, and the grocery store. Then in another 40 years I could retire all over again with another pension. Yeah boi !
 

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Discussion Starter #28
All kidding aside (if that's even possible), how about the PLC and automation route? I dabbled in it for a short while when I was doing machine rewiring and building control panels. I didn't get into the programming end since programming machine tools is basically an engineer's job, but it was all very interesting nevertheless. I just didn't like the daily factory environment which I found boring. That said, I have to think of something to do when I finally get sick of cutting in slim recessed lights and doing service upgrades.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
I do fire alarm work. After 24 years doing electrical distribution work in the plant It is a real change. Not making the money I was in the plant but it is nice not working behind a chain link fence and not going through the same gate every day. I just work part time but now we have a lot of work. I tell everyone that I am on the extra board.

LC

What type of fire alarm work? Install? Programming and commissioning? Troubleshooting and testing? It seems doing anything but new install would be a good career down the road.
 

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Bilge Rat
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When I get too old to work anymore, I want to be a Toilet Man. You know, the guy who comes around and cleans the Sani-Huts........

Yes, it's a nasty job but the actual reality is that the Toilet Man is by far the most important guy on any job.
 

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36th year apprentice & Floor Sweeper
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When I get too old to work anymore, I want to be a Toilet Man. You know, the guy who comes around and cleans the Sani-Huts........

Yes, it's a nasty job but the actual reality is that the Toilet Man is by far the most important guy on any job.
Not to mention you get to view some nice art work. My favorite was an arrogant foreman I had. They captured his likeness wearing speedos and military pressing a giant c#ck
 

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I do installs and commisioning . I do not care for computers and all of our equipment is computer based. I think programming would be extremely boring after about the first hour.
Installs require both physical and mental abilities as well as a degree of craftamanship and I enjoy that more than pounding on a keyboard.

LC
 
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Chief Flunky
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I do installs and commisioning . I do not care for computers and all of our equipment is computer based. I think programming would be extremely boring after about the first hour.

Installs require both physical and mental abilities as well as a degree of craftamanship and I enjoy that more than pounding on a keyboard.



LC

It stays more interesting than that but you are a craftsman. That’s what turns your crank. Computer programming is like solving puzzles except designing user interfaces that are more like art.

A lot of guys that like dealing with people go into supervision or sales or running their own shop which is doing it all. Ones that are detail oriented go into planning. Ones that like troubleshooting go into technicians. You can also scale the jobs by the type of work. For instance alarm and A/V techs don’t usually do a lot with anything over #14 wire but linemen are pole jockeys and do 90% physical labor. There is also the whole residential/commercial/industrial aspect. Or if you are willing to go back to school get an engineering or maybe a law degree. I know one of the top engineers at GE who was an electrician but went back to school at age 45 and went into engineering as his way of “slowing down”.

There is so much available in the world that anyone with an interest, some small talent, and a small amount of willingness to take a risk can do.

And it changes over time. Goal setting is important but happiness does not come from the goal itself which is just a moment. It’s in the journey to get there,
 

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Hackenschmidt
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All kidding aside (if that's even possible), how about the PLC and automation route?
What type of fire alarm work? Install? Programming and commissioning? Troubleshooting and testing? It seems doing anything but new install would be a good career down the road.
With general electrical service and construction, it's a broad field but most people come to it the same few ways. The more technical stuff, there's a lot more roads to Rome. Getting a foot in the door is the hardest part.

With the economy currently booming, places are more flexible, rather than waiting around for a perfect candidate willing to take what they want to pay, they're paying more and being flexible. That's an opportunity to get in and get some experience. I think it's so important to capitalize on these opportunities when they occur over the course of your life, it really changes your arc. You sit one out and you've really blown it.

I can think of a bunch of examples but the one I'd go for around here is Johnson Controls. They are dying for good people, organizing their hires into the local, and paying way over scale if you are productive. They are dominant locally with health care, higher education (colleges and universities) and large corporations. To me that's pretty good insurance they won't bust hard when the boom breaks. Honestly, if I wasn't pretty much unemployable after so many years self employed, I'd be tempted myself.
 
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how about the PLC and automation route? .
I went from resi to automation maintenance a few years ago at mid career. Best move ever. Only drawback to this path that I see is that it seems that a lot of automation maintenance jobs have required on call duties. Sucks getting called at 2am to drive 1.5 hours and t-shoot problems. Maybe not for the retirees.
 

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I currently am working as a Estimator, sometimes I miss the grunt field work but my right knee isn't what it used to be after a accident. So the office environment isn't that bad, plus I still get out to look at jobs and visit vendors.
 

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I went from resi to automation maintenance a few years ago at mid career. Best move ever. Only drawback to this path that I see is that it seems that a lot of automation maintenance jobs have required on call duties. Sucks getting called at 2am to drive 1.5 hours and t-shoot problems. Maybe not for the retirees.
I remember being on call and that 2:00AM call. The company always stressed safety but how safe is it when you come in with only 4 hours of sleep and you still have to work the day shift. If you went home to get cleaned up or some sleep, then you did not get over time pay. I quit after getting screwed out of the OT several times.
 

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Bilge Rat
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I remember being on call and that 2:00AM call. The company always stressed safety but how safe is it when you come in with only 4 hours of sleep and you still have to work the day shift. If you went home to get cleaned up or some sleep, then you did not get over time pay. I quit after getting screwed out of the OT several times.
Safety is enforcing written regulations, not actual safety.

I also left a company a few years ago for the same reason......among a few others.
 
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