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I see people mounting tv's up on a wall, then running the power cord into the wall, down the wall, and back out into a receptacle.

My instincts tell me that's against code.. it is right?

Because I think about it and I can't really think of a good reason why it shouldn't be allowed, but I hate it.
 

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NEC ARTICLE 400 Flexible Cords and CablesGeneral 400.1 Scope.
This article covers general requirements, applications, and construction specifications for flexible cords and flexible cables.
400.8 Uses Not Permitted (ref. Extension Cord) Flexible cords and cables shall not be used for the following:

(1) As a substitute for the fixed wiring of a structure
(2) Where run through holes in walls, structural ceilings, suspended ceilings, dropped ceilings, or floors
(3) Where run through doorways, windows, or similar openings
(4) Where attached to building surfaces
(5) Where concealed by walls, floors, or ceilings or located above suspended or dropped ceilings
 

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And for those in the Land of Eh....:thumbsup:

Canadian Electrical Code CEC®
4-010 (3)(a)(ii)
Flexible cord shall not be used run through holes in walls, ceilings or floors.
 

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Fond of three phase
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Mike Holt did a recent 19 minute video with a different view-point on 400.8

NEC 2014 - Equipment for General Use Article 400 - Flexible Cords and Flexible Cables

http://forums.mikeholt.com/showthread.php?t=157262
The video states that, as long as the power cord is not altered in any way, as the entire unit is U/L listed, as a complete unit.
They claim the U/L listing, supersedes Article 400.8. :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Mike Holt did a recent 19 minute video with a different view-point on 400.8

NEC 2014 - Equipment for General Use Article 400 - Flexible Cords and Flexible Cables

http://forums.mikeholt.com/showthread.php?t=157262
Shít man! That's exactly what I'm talking about. At first inclination, it would seem like code doesn't allow it.. but it makes absolutely no sense for it to not be allowed.

I'm going to dig into this deeper.. because I want to tell people it's not allowed, but I'm too scared to back up my code references and reasoning why, when it seems reasonable to do it.

Thanks for the video!
 

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Fond of three phase
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Shít man! That's exactly what I'm talking about. At first inclination, it would seem like code doesn't allow it.. but it makes absolutely no sense for it to not be allowed.

I'm going to dig into this deeper.. because I want to tell people it's not allowed, but I'm too scared to back up my code references and reasoning why, when it seems reasonable to do it.

Thanks for the video!
I see so much of it with dropped ceilings. If the power cord is not altered and can be removed without tools, just by lifting out the panel, I don't see the problem. :rolleyes:
 

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There's not a fire Marshall in america that would allow a cord to pass through a drop ceiling.
Here in Canada, we can get cord ended Pac Poles. I don't believe they are NEC approved.
But afaik, that is the only flexible cord unit that is allowed in a Tbar ( return air plenum) ceiling.
 

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And for those in the Land of Eh....:thumbsup:

Canadian Electrical Code CEC®
4-010 (3)(a)(ii)
Flexible cord shall not be used run through holes in walls, ceilings or floors.
Rule 4-012 in the 2012 book.

Just run it through a some pipe, call it "mechanical protection" and go have a nap. Not technically a hole in the wall.
 

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Any cable run in walls has to be marked with an FT number to show that it meets flame spread requirements.Like many of those monster video and speaker cables that aren't legal for roughing in the walls as most are not FT rated.Cabtire is not FT rated is it?I am always asked by customers to pull in monster cables in their new house when I'm doing the rough wire.If there is no flame test stamped on it then it is against code to install it in the walls.
 

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Any cable run in walls has to be marked with an FT number to show that it meets flame spread requirements.Like many of those monster video and speaker cables that aren't legal for roughing in the walls as most are not FT rated.Cabtire is not FT rated is it?I am always asked by customers to pull in monster cables in their new house when I'm doing the rough wire.If there is no flame test stamped on it then it is against code to install it in the walls.
What if you just put it in Smurf-tube (flexible conduit)???
 

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The video states that, as long as the power cord is not altered in any way, as the entire unit is U/L listed, as a complete unit.
They claim the U/L listing, supersedes Article 400.8. :eek:
Not really. They're saying that if it's an assembly...what he calls a "power supply cord" in the video, then it falls under UL 718(I think is the standard), but Article 400 only covers UL 62 listed cords. So it doesn't supersede...it just was never within the scope of 400 anyway.

HOWEVER, towards the end, one of the "panel members"(can't remember who) says that as HE understands it, that power supply cords are made with flexible cords, which would make them fall under UL 62, and so also Article 400.

IOW, they really didn't come to any conclusion other than to say that items listed by UL 62...WHATEVER that covers, is within the scope of Article 400.

(I think that video was referencing NEC '14....your results may vary :) :thumbsup: )
 
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