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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I came across a few double-wide prefab homes, with a 4500 watt water heater, wired with #12 romex. I tried explaining to the HO, that this is clearly illegal. Their response is always the same. That's how they built the home, with permits, and CO's, so it's OK. It passed all inspections. Never had a problem with the water heater.

18.75 amps, the 20 amp breaker doesn't trip, the wire is barely warm, & the breaker is barely warm. It works fine, even after extended showers, etc, etc.

How do these pre fab home building companies get away with this ???
 

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I came across a few double-wide prefab homes, with a 4500 watt water heater, wired with #12 romex. I tried explaining to the HO, that this is clearly illegal. Their response is always the same. That's how they built the home, with permits, and CO's, so it's OK. It passed all inspections. Never had a problem with the water heater.

18.75 amps, the 20 amp breaker doesn't trip, the wire is barely warm, & the breaker is barely warm. It works fine, even after extended showers, etc, etc.

How do these pre fab home building companies get away with this ???
Maybe the trailer park has 120/208.
 

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Estwing magic
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Doesn't surprise me. Modular builders seem to be able to write their own code book. I have worked maintenance on industrial camp trailers that were manufactured both in Canada and the US and they must be built by coke addicts. Plus, they cut every corner they can.

One of the worst violations I saw was #18 run from the switch for the 120V power to furnaces. This wasn't noticed until it was time for furnace replacement.
 

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I came across a few double-wide prefab homes, with a 4500 watt water heater, wired with #12 romex. I tried explaining to the HO, that this is clearly illegal. Their response is always the same. That's how they built the home, with permits, and CO's, so it's OK. It passed all inspections. Never had a problem with the water heater.

18.75 amps, the 20 amp breaker doesn't trip, the wire is barely warm, & the breaker is barely warm. It works fine, even after extended showers, etc, etc.

How do these pre fab home building companies get away with this ???
Hud is responsible for these homes. They are inspected when they are manufactured. They get away with stuff that the NEC wouldn't allow.

But if you notice most water heaters have 2 heating elements and they are usually 4500 W each. But since both elements are never on at the same time, 4500 W is the max it will draw.

All the water heaters I've seen in these mfg homes are only single element. But that still is 4500 W or 18.75A/23.43A continuous. I usually see them on #10 with either a 25A or 30A breaker. Not sure how they got away with #12 for the one in the OP.
Unless the heater that came with the home was smaller and someone replaced it with a larger one.
 

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A recent one I saw that was only a few months old had no tr receptacles, no arc faults, and a panel so small that there wouldn't be anyway. Talking with the state guy, he mentioned the HUD thing too. Not sure whether this was a really a HUD home or not.
 

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99cents said:
Doesn't surprise me. Modular builders seem to be able to write their own code book. I have worked maintenance on industrial camp trailers that were manufactured both in Canada and the US and they must be built by coke addicts. Plus, they cut every corner they can. One of the worst violations I saw was #18 run from the switch for the 120V power to furnaces. This wasn't noticed until it was time for furnace replacement.
I take it you have worked on some Atco trailers ;-)
 

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I worked with a guy that worked for a trailer fab company.
They would assemble a trailer from a wheeled frame to a complete product, sheets on the bed and curtains on the walls in 90 minutes.
 

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A recent one I saw that was only a few months old had no tr receptacles, no arc faults, and a panel so small that there wouldn't be anyway. Talking with the state guy, he mentioned the HUD thing too. Not sure whether this was a really a HUD home or not.
If you've ever installed a service for a new mobile home (single, double, or prefab) you'll notice the electrical inspector is only allowed to look at the service outside and just the panel inside, and that's just to verify that a 4-wire was run to it. He's not allowed to look at the interior wiring because it falls under HUD.

The home however has to have the sticker on it where it was inspected at the factory.
 

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corn-fused
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ive worked on a few 'mobile' homes. in my county the rules go to hud and nec and they dont seem to agree. teh county usually gives in to hud rules:rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I did all the load calcs, and measured the current. It's 18.70 amps, on 12 ga wire. 238 volts, which dips a little bit.

So I guess HUD is higher than the NEC ??
 
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