Electrician Talk banner
1 - 20 of 39 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
925 Posts
I dunno.....but I do know that you have to,use specially coated nails and screws with today's pressure treated wood. The chemical in modern pressure treated corrode galvanized fasteners.

Wouldn't hurt to throw a coat of paint on the wood before you mount a galvanized can.

And use coated mounting screws
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,105 Posts
I dunno.....but I do know that you have to,use specially coated nails and screws with today's pressure treated wood. The chemical in modern pressure treated corrode galvanized fasteners.

Wouldn't hurt to throw a coat of paint on the wood before you mount a galvanized can.

And use coated mounting screws
It takes PT wood about 1 year to dry out so if you paint it to early the paint will peel off.
I would put some "peel and stick" flashing on the back of the panel before mounting it.

Coated screws is good advise. Last fall I built a deck using all coated hardware. I suggest looking here...

http://www.strongtie.com/products/category_list.html#
 

·
Senile Member
I make all the electrons line up for their Flu shots
Joined
·
35,193 Posts
All construction lumber in Hawaii gets pressure treatment. Been that way as long as I lived here. It has no effect on the nails or anything you mount up to it. Before osmose treatment when you had (supposed to) dip the cut ends in green sauce, that was bad to get on your skin, but it didn't rot any nails..
 
  • Like
Reactions: Magnettica

·
NJ-IEC
Joined
·
14,387 Posts
I do the exact same thing but I screw the plywood to the 2x4 first then countersink some holes and go through the whole thing with long tapcons.
I drill out the 2x4's with 1 1/4" paddle bit so the 5/8 lag bolt head sits inside the hole. I go about 3/4 of the way through the stud then finish the hole with a 1/4" bit so the lag bolt doesn't go all the way through and sits in there nicely. Then I tighten down the bolt with a nut driver and secure 5/8 plywood over the holes, paint, and mount panel. It's a system that may be a little overkill but around here we have a lot of old houses and the mounting surfaces are not always good. This way with the lags and shields has never failed me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,204 Posts
I drill out the 2x4's with 1 1/4" paddle bit so the 5/8 lag bolt head sits inside the hole. I go about 3/4 of the way through the stud then finish the hole with a 1/4" bit so the lag bolt doesn't go all the way through and sits in there nicely. Then I tighten down the bolt with a nut driver and secure 5/8 plywood over the holes, paint, and mount panel. It's a system that may be a little overkill but around here we have a lot of old houses and the mounting surfaces are not always good. This way with the lags and shields has never failed me.
I usually screw the 2x4s to the floor joists above, and hold them tight to the concrete, and the plywood ties them together. It's been a ****'s age since I mounted a panel backer directly to the concrete.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,167 Posts
I've never worried about it. If you are concerned with the new (circa 2007) pressure treating chemicals and the reaction to the steel on the panel, a simple solution would to install a SS or nylon washer behind the panel where the fasteners go through the enclosure. That would keep the panel from touching the wood.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
4,505 Posts
Going_Commando said:
I usually screw the 2x4s to the floor joists above, and hold them tight to the concrete, and the plywood ties them together. It's been a ****'s age since I mounted a panel backer directly to the concrete.
I just glue a couple of green 2x4's to the wall with liquid nails then shoot some nails into the wall with my Remington 22 cal power hammer.
I then screw the plywood to that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,167 Posts
We just put vapour barrier on back of ply or tar paper , what ever is handy.
Are you doing this between the panel and the plywood?

We are talking about PT wood used outside, right?
 

·
Electrical Simpleton
Joined
·
3,350 Posts
If it were in a basement of new construction why the bother with PT wood?

The foundation walls are either water-proofed or damp-proofed on the outside.

Pete
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
4,505 Posts
Pete m. said:
If it were in a basement of new construction why the bother with PT wood? The foundation walls are either water-proofed or damp-proofed on the outside. Pete
Concrete holds in moisture, when wood is on the concrete non pressure treated wood will soak the moisture from the concrete and rot away.
 
1 - 20 of 39 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top