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How do you ECs find such good paying customers. I bid two recessed cans in six rooms with a total of 12 cans and six switch drops. also add a receptacle to the other side of a wall and lower a thermostat. My price was $2100.00 which I thought was a bargain, but I still did not get the job. Ive bid five other small service type jobs at very reasonable prices but landed none of them.
 

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your price is right around where I would be

and sometimes it takes a HO awhile to get back to you

I just got confirmation today from a job I priced 2 or 3 weeks ago

and Ive gotten calls about jobs Ive bid over a year earlier

sometimes the HO wasn't expecting the price you gave and it takes awhile to get the funds
 

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How do you ECs find such good paying customers. I bid two recessed cans in six rooms with a total of 12 cans and six switch drops. also add a receptacle to the other side of a wall and lower a thermostat. My price was $2100.00 which I thought was a bargain, but I still did not get the job. Ive bid five other small service type jobs at very reasonable prices but landed none of them.
A lot of my good paying customers would never ask for a price. They just tell me what they want done and tell me to do the job!:thumbsup:
 

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Price shoppers will always find someone cheaper. You won't win them all.
How did those people find you? A lot depends on which pond you are fishing in and how well you are able to sell yourself.

You really do have to develop some sales skills and be very confident about what you are offering and that you are worth what you charge.

Also, we often find that the high end customers can be the most price sensitive. Maybe because some live beyond their means or maybe its because they don't think people in the trades deserve to make a decent living. Some of the really high end folks have a SOP of squeezing the last drop out of everyone.

We were just at a VEEERRRY nice house where they wanted a TON of work. Our price was $27K. They only wanted to spend $7,000. They were so upset at our price. Wanted us to do the work because we have a good reputation. We suggested they don't do everything at once and change the scope of work- meet somewhere in the middle, but noooooo they were insistent on getting EVERYTHING they wanted for 7K. NO not from us. But I am sure that they found someone to do it for them. Good luck and God bless them.

Don't get me started.......

Just keep going. You won't win them all. If you keep losing on price, think about other places to look for customers or ways for a different group to find you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Price shoppers will always find someone cheaper. You won't win them all.
How did those people find you? A lot depends on which pond you are fishing in and how well you are able to sell yourself.

You really do have to develop some sales skills and be very confident about what you are offering and that you are worth what you charge.

Also, we often find that the high end customers can be the most price sensitive. Maybe because some live beyond their means or maybe its because they don't think people in the trades deserve to make a decent living. Some of the really high end folks have a SOP of squeezing the last drop out of everyone.

We were just at a VEEERRRY nice house where they wanted a TON of work. Our price was $27K. They only wanted to spend $7,000. They were so upset at our price. Wanted us to do the work because we have a good reputation. We suggested they don't do everything at once and change the scope of work- meet somewhere in the middle, but noooooo they were insistent on getting EVERYTHING they wanted for 7K. NO not from us. But I am sure that they found someone to do it for them. Good luck and God bless them.

Don't get me started.......

Just keep going. You won't win them all. If you keep losing on price, think about other places to look for customers or ways for a different group to find you.
This is true. I pushed one of my contractors on price on a remodel. I stuck with my price and told him he could pay me what he owed me for what I had done at that point, and get a lower cost electrician if he wanted for thee rest of the job. He ended up admitting that the money was not a problem and I got twice as much as what he offered. I need to stick to my guns.
 

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Sounds like situations in need of a little



This book lays out a plan you can use to succeed in life.

To make friends:
Never criticize, show sincere appreciation, find out what others want and show them how to get it, become interested in them, smile at them, and know their name.

To Influence:
Praise and appreciate, ask questions instead of giving a direct order, give the other person a reputation to live up to, and make the other person happy about doing what you suggest.
 

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Wow, don't we know this. Many times folks don't have any idea what goes into a project. I had a HO say to me a few weeks ago, "I didn't know so much stuff was need to do this, how do keep track of all this stuff". I smiled and said thats why you hired me, experience, and all the free jokes too. Yep, DYI -TV 30 mins later a whole new kitchen. Conditioned markets don't help us.
 

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We have 5 service guys who sell their own work. We could send our top performer and our bottom performer to the exact same call. Both guys are equally skilled as electricians and equally personable and well liked by customers. Top guy will usually come back with $300-$1500 on most calls where they either have something not working or say they are ready to do the job same day. Bottom guy will come back with trip charge only and leave an estimate or come back with less than $200. We see this pattern time and time again.
Sometimes he gets lucky and will sell a bigger job that at least gets his numbers to where he is at least in the range of his sales justifying his position. If he does not get any bigger jobs his numbers suck and he is an expense on our finances, not a revenue producer. He usually wins about 2 decent jobs each month and his sales are terrible the rest of the time. If he hit singles on more of those every day calls and still got the occasional big job, he would be our top performer, not the bottom.

This happens consistently so I know it is the guys,not the calls. The top guy is always solid. He does not hit too many home runs but always at least gets to first base. It really adds up and makes a big difference. The other guy will hit the occassional triple or home run but does not get to first base more often than not.

Some people are harder to say no to and some are easier. I also see him making judgement calls about what he thinks a customer will go for or not, based on his personal bias. He struggles with charging appropriately for his skill and knowledge and is often uncomfortable charging diagnostic fees (which do include a repair) rather than only charging for the reapir because he already knows what the problem is. He will just change out a device rather than charge for a diagnostic which includes a device.

The difference of a few hundred dollars a day is very significant. We have talked about this, but the difference in attitude and performance is strictly an internal force which only the person making the calls has control over. You have a lot of power over your results based on your own attitude and beliefs.
 

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I have a very small issue that happens once in a while and I'm not sure the best way to go about handling it.

I always talk about portable generator connections cause I like doing them and it's good work around here. I could sell the job for good money.

For example, it's usually around $300 in material, sometimes a slow as $200. I could sell the complete job for $800-1,200 (depending on how much working it is running the cable out the to inlet). Sometimes, the inlet is on the other side of the wall so it's 5 minutes for that part.

So for a simple job, I got let's say $250 in material and I sell it for $850. It takes me 30-45 minutes to do, let's call it an hour.

Now the customer is almost always happy with it, but once in a while I'll have a customer who says "That's it? I paid $850 for this little piece of metal on my panel and an hour's worth of work?"

What's the best way to answer that?

I've tried to reply that the material is very expensive (which, is kinda lying). I go thru the fact that it's waranteed and professionally installed, but sometimes they look at me like I'm a crook.

This doesn't happen that often, but I'd like to be better prepared when it does happen.
 

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Haxwoper said:
I have a very small issue that happens once in a while and I'm not sure the best way to go about handling it. I always talk about portable generator connections cause I like doing them and it's good work around here. I could sell the job for good money. For example, it's usually around $300 in material, sometimes a slow as $200. I could sell the complete job for $800-1,200 (depending on how much working it is running the cable out the to inlet). Sometimes, the inlet is on the other side of the wall so it's 5 minutes for that part. So for a simple job, I got let's say $250 in material and I sell it for $850. It takes me 30-45 minutes to do, let's call it an hour. Now the customer is almost always happy with it, but once in a while I'll have a customer who says "That's it? I paid $850 for this little piece of metal on my panel and an hour's worth of work?" What's the best way to answer that? I've tried to reply that the material is very expensive (which, is kinda lying). I go thru the fact that it's waranteed and professionally installed, but sometimes they look at me like I'm a crook. This doesn't happen that often, but I'd like to be better prepared when it does happen.
. You're also installing the interlock kits too , right ? If they have a generator already , do you do a dry run and show them all the proper steps ? Maybe also explain to them how you're licensed , insured and bonded , and have costs for running a business ? This all factors into the price because a professional ( not a handyman ) , is installing it . Bottom line is , cheap people are just that and some of them will never understand or think that we deserve what we ask for . If you go through all that and they still look at you like that , you really don't want to be working for them anymore anyway .
 

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. You're also installing the interlock kits too , right ? If they have a generator already , do you do a dry run and show them all the proper steps ? Maybe also explain to them how you're licensed , insured and bonded , and have costs for running a business ? This all factors into the price because a professional ( not a handyman ) , is installing it . Bottom line is , cheap people are just that and some of them will never understand or think that we deserve what we ask for . If you go through all that and they still look at you like that , you really don't want to be working for them anymore anyway .
Yes, I go thru all the steps, show them how it works, I hang a stainless steel document holder near the panel with custom instructions. Everyone is always amazed to see that their little generator could power their whole house.

But still, my question is about the proper response to customers complaining about cost afterwards when they see it wasn't as much work as they expected.
 
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