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Has anyone done these yearly bonding inspections on public pools or know of a good reference to find out about them.
 

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Tool Fetish
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I attended a couple of seminars about the requirements just as the law was adopted. Liability is too high for me to get involved. Too many electrical contractors doing pool certifications without the proper equipment or training. I have specialty ground test equipment that we went to Biddle/Megger in Dallas for 40 hours of training on a while ago, when MSHA started requiring mining facilities to have yearly ground tests and certifications. I know someone that was involved with developing the pool certification rule. It was originally intended to be performed by NETA certified contractors instead of electrical contractors. Once the politicians got involved it was decided that there weren't enough NETA contractors in NJ to handle the volume of work, so the law was written to accept electrical contractors as the certifiers. Most electricians that I have talked to are using an ohm meter to test the bonding grid. A standard ohm meter draws no current. If the pool bond is broken down to a conductor the size of a hair, a standard ohm meter will still show low resistance, when in reality, the integrity of the bond is not certifiable.
When called to certify pool bonding, I recommend a NETA contractor that I use.
 

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I have a few I do. Just measure between all metal non current carrying parts and make sure you have less then 25 ohms. If you don't bond them better.

Then write up a compliance cert.

Its a good idea to make sure your E&O covers it first.
 

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Tool Fetish
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Just curious,
What meter are you using? Was it calibrated? Do you do a field calibration check before every certification? How long are your test leads and what is their resistance? Do you include the meter serial number and all of the other information on your report? This information is critical if, God forbid, anything ever goes wrong. We have been doing ground grid and plant resistance tests on mines for years. The above information was garnered from attending MSHA and Biddle training courses.
 

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Just curious,
What meter are you using? Was it calibrated? Do you do a field calibration check before every certification? How long are your test leads and what is their resistance? Do you include the meter serial number and all of the other information on your report? This information is critical if, God forbid, anything ever goes wrong. We have been doing ground grid and plant resistance tests on mines for years. The above information was garnered from attending MSHA and Biddle training courses.
Of course, I do all that. :rolleyes:
 
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Tool Fetish
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Just measure between all metal non current carrying parts and make sure you have less then 25 ohms. If you don't bond them better.Then write up a compliance cert.
What standard does your 25 ohm target come from? Hopefully not the NEC grounding electrode to earth resistance maximum. That measurement has nothing to do with grounding and bonding continuity. 25 ohms is the NEC maximum requirement for a grounding electrode resistance through the surrounding earth. Any grounding or bonding continuity tests that we perform on industrial sites are investigated for a cause on anything above 3 ohms and repaired on anything over 5 ohms.
The NJ statute is misleading in that it references the 25 ohm rule as a grounding electrode reference, not a continuity test target.It leaves the pass / fail decision up to the electrical contractor, along with all liability.
 

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What standard does your 25 ohm target come from? Hopefully not the NEC grounding electrode to earth resistance maximum. That measurement has nothing to do with grounding and bonding continuity. 25 ohms is the NEC maximum requirement for a grounding electrode resistance through the surrounding earth. Any grounding or bonding continuity tests that we perform on industrial sites are investigated for a cause on anything above 3 ohms and repaired on anything over 5 ohms.
The NJ statute is misleading in that it references the 25 ohm rule as a grounding electrode reference, not a continuity test target.It leaves the pass / fail decision up to the electrical contractor, along with all liability.
Good talk.

Yes we do certifications. $899

If I let the fear of liability run my business I'd be an employee already. I do the test the way the state requires it and keep my E&O paid.
 

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Goldagain said:
Good talk. Yes we do certifications. $899 If I let the fear of liability run my business I'd be an employee already. I do the test the way the state requires it and keep my E&O paid.
I have often wondered how most of these guys on here survive in life with all the fear and worry they post on here.

Also how they survive on a construction site without the moderators on here filtering what others say to them
 

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We do very few pools the cost for a PROPER inspection per the law requires a ductor/DLRO/Micro-ohm meter, or a two point ground tested for accurate measurements cost us about $880.00 at a minimum.

There is a company here that does them for $220.00, let him have them. I followed them on a few and the bonding in the pump room was a joke and the customer said the report from the other guy said nothing about bonding issues.
 

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Tool Fetish
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I have often wondered how most of these guys on here survive in life with all the fear and worry they post on here.

Also how they survive on a construction site without the moderators on here filtering what others say to them
As discussed in previous posts, I wouldn't wish becoming a defendant, in a wrongfull death suit for an electrocution on a project that you worked on in the past, on anyone. Liability insurance covered my 1/3 of the financial settlement costs, nothing gets back the lost time and sleep over that four year period. Just sayin.
Just do everything to the best of your ability.;)
 

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As discussed in previous posts, I wouldn't wish becoming a defendant, in a wrongfull death suit for an electrocution on a project that you worked on in the past, on anyone. Liability insurance covered my 1/3 of the financial settlement costs, nothing gets back the lost time and sleep over that four year period. Just sayin.
Just do everything to the best of your ability.;)
I CAN ONLY SPEAK FOR MYSELF.

I believe in doing what I am comfortable with, what I know and what equipment I own to perform certain work. I have no problem with testing a pool per local codes. But I am not going to hack my way into this minor section of the market.
 

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I CAN ONLY SPEAK FOR MYSELF.

I believe in doing what I am comfortable with, what I know and what equipment I own to perform certain work. I have no problem with testing a pool per local codes. But I am not going to hack my way into this minor section of the market.
I charged them 1200 dollars when I used your meter a few years back and the management company flipped out when they got my invoice ...they told me the last guy did it for 295.... (eyes bulging out) .... I was there nearly all day crawling around under this pool... (in a building) checking the numerous points..
I wont do another one again.....to many folk just winging it driving price down..
 

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Tool Fetish
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I CAN ONLY SPEAK FOR MYSELF.

I believe in doing what I am comfortable with, what I know and what equipment I own to perform certain work. I have no problem with testing a pool per local codes. But I am not going to hack my way into this minor section of the market.
Our state statute doesn't specify what the acceptable values are. The statute misleadingly states that the NEC requires a maximum of 25 ohms for a grounding electrode. In the next sentence it states that this doesn't mean that is to be the accepted value for testing pool bonding grids.
The background for this pool testing in NJ is based on problems in quite a few shore towns, in the not to distant past, having horriffic stray voltage problems. The POCO underground distribution conductors deteorating to the point of some developments not being able to use their pools. There were whole neighborhoods of people getting shocked in their pools. The better the condition of your bonding grid, the less likely chance you have of getting shocked, or worse.
Brian,
I also have the proper equipment and training to perform the certifications. I can't compete with a contractor telling a customer that his grid tested out OK at 25 ohms with a multimeter that has never been calibrated, when I know that is not an acceptable reading.
RANT FINALLY OVER:thumbup:
 

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Our state statute doesn't specify what the acceptable values are. The statute misleadingly states that the NEC requires a maximum of 25 ohms for a grounding electrode. In the next sentence it states that this doesn't mean that is to be the accepted value for testing pool bonding grids.
Same issue here, the same person must have written but statues.
Brian,
I also have the proper equipment and training to perform the certifications. I can't compete with a contractor telling a customer that his grid tested out OK at 25 ohms with a multimeter that has never been calibrated, when I know that is not an acceptable reading.
RANT FINALLY OVER:thumbup:
SAme here:thumbsup:
 
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