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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was recently on a job in which my coworker said we would use one continuous conductor to go from the ground bus to the water pipe, and around the water meter. The picture in my textbook shows one conductor going from the bus to the pipe, and another going around the meter. Which is the best way to do it, and why?
Also, the job we were on did not have rebar, so we just ran another conductor from the bus to the ground rod. Is this correct?
Also, is the water meter always installed within 5' of the wall?
 

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Ground electrode conductors must be continuous or irreversibly spliced last I checked. Don't see how you could just the meter like that. I just use 1 piece of wire and hit pipe clamps on either side. Those books have typos and wrong **** in them all the time.

ETA: Check out 250.64(C). Grounding electrode conductor(s) shall be installed in one continuous length without a splice or joint except as permitted in 1-4. None of those exceptions include using the the pipe the way they did. The picture is a code violation.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Going_Commando said:
Ground electrode conductors must be continuous or irreversibly spliced last I checked. Don't see how you could just the meter like that. I just use 1 piece of wire and hit pipe clamps on either side. Those books have typos and wrong **** in them all the time.
250.64:
250.64 Grounding Electrode Conductor Installation. Grounding electrode conductors at the service, at each building or structure where supplied by a feeder(s) or branch circuit(s), or at a separately derived system shall be installed as specified in 250.64(A) through (F).

As for the water pipe, would 250.64(C)(4) allow for more than 1 piece of wire?

(C) Continuous. Except as provided in 250.30(A)(5) and (A)(6), 250.30(B)(1), and 250.68(C), grounding electrode conductor(s) shall be installed in one continuous length without a splice or joint. If necessary, splices or connections shall be made as permitted in (1) through (4):
(1) 
Splicing of the wire-type grounding electrode conductor shall be permitted only by irreversible compression-type connectors listed as grounding and bonding equipment or by the exothermic welding process.
(2) 
Sections of busbars shall be permitted to be connected together to form a grounding electrode conductor.
(3) 
Bolted, riveted, or welded connections of structural metal frames of buildings or structures.
(4) 
Threaded, welded, brazed, soldered or bolted-flange connections of metal water piping.

ETA: Are the sections of pipe around the meter threaded? I didn't notice.
 

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Check out 250.64(C). Grounding electrode conductor(s) shall be installed in one continuous length without a splice or joint except as permitted in 1-4. None of those exceptions include using the the pipe the way they did. The picture is a code violation.
The GEC must be continuous, but not GEC jumpers.

250.68(C)( Metallic Water Pipe and Structural Metal. Grounding
electrode conductors and bonding jumpers shall be permitted
to be connected at the following locations and used
to extend the connection to an electrode(s):
(1) Interior metal water piping located not more than 1.52 m
(5 ft) from the point of entrance to the building shall be
permitted to be used as a conductor to interconnect electrodes
that are part of the grounding electrode system.
 

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Owl, since there was no rebar ground and you ran a separate wire to the rods I believe you were fine. IMO you could have tied the rods there also.

But the book should have had the rebar ground on the street side of the meter, which is being used by the author as a grounding electrode tie point.

As previously stated the jumper is just bonding.
 

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There is only one grounding electrode conductor and that goes from the panel to the water pipe. The others are bonding jumpers not grounding electrode conductor's.
 
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There is only one grounding electrode conductor and that goes from the panel to the water pipe. The others are bonding jumpers not grounding electrode conductor's.
This exactly.

I have had arguments with multiple inspectors over this in the past and I refused to budge on the issue. A lot seem to want one continuous wire from the panel to the pipe and then to the ground rods or ufer. I would show them each code section and explain what a bonding jumper is. Mike holt has a few good pictures that show it as well.
154230

154231
 
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