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Discussion Starter #1
I know there are a ton of posts on boots already, but just curious about the electrical hazard rating. I notice there are steel toed boots that have this rating. How dangerous is steel toed if you still have EH rating or is the answer not at all, but people avoid because your feet will get cold in winter weather?


I looked up the EH rating as...
Electrical Hazard boots, as dictated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), must be able to withstand 18000 volts of electricity at 60 hertz for a whole minute without leakage of more than one milliampere under dry conditions. According to OSHA, electrical hazard boots should be used in conjunction with other protective wear.
 

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Nevermind, I see someone answered this already.

I do however, remember a buddy at a factory I worked at getting his toes chopped off with the steel toes from a wheel bearing on a gear driven assembly running over his foot.
 

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My Keen have composite toes
 

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Some boots are designed to dissipate static electricity. Ya gotta watch out for those if you're looking for electrical insulation.
 

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An EH rating for a normal steel toe boot has more to do with the foot protection on the bottom. That bottom plate is composite or plastic.
The puncture rating is what’s important. They don’t want a carpet tack or nail puncturing up to the foot. The plate stops the nail from going all the way thru and grounding you.
Ive seen a number of new kids walking around with carpet tacks sticking into their boot soles.

Like I always tell people, check your tools, your PPE and that includes your boots.
 

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The leather over the steel will protect you from most unwanted electrical occurrences. The steel toe is there to protect you from a falling object and if you are following your electrical safety manual, you shouldn't be anywhere that would put your baby toe in harm of getting a shock. You need a path for the electricity to flow, how it that happening. Once your boots have been worn and dusty, the electrical rating goes out the window. We have 15K rated boots here on site and they are just big heavy rubber boots that have been tested just like gloves.

Tim.
 

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Nevermind, I see someone answered this already.

I do however, remember a buddy at a factory I worked at getting his toes chopped off with the steel toes from a wheel bearing on a gear driven assembly running over his foot.
Imagine what would have happened w/o the steel toe?

For a very long time workers hesitant to purchase safe boots for whatever the reason have referenced "somebody" who had their safety steel toe turned into a toe guillotine under some gear or roll of cable or crushing force... as if they would have fared any better wearing the boot-like hikers or uggs they insist on wearing.

An EH rating for a normal steel toe boot has more to do with the foot protection on the bottom. That bottom plate is composite or plastic.
The puncture rating is what’s important. They don’t want a carpet tack or nail puncturing up to the foot. The plate stops the nail from going all the way thru and grounding you.
Ive seen a number of new kids walking around with carpet tacks sticking into their boot soles.

Like I always tell people, check your tools, your PPE and that includes your boots.
Carpet tacks? Are those even a thing anymore?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Imagine what would have happened w/o the steel toe?

For a very long time workers hesitant to purchase safe boots for whatever the reason have referenced "somebody" who had their safety steel toe turned into a toe guillotine under some gear or roll of cable or crushing force... as if they would have fared any better wearing the boot-like hikers or uggs they insist on wearing.



Carpet tacks? Are those even a thing anymore?
LoL, your right would've just had pancakes for toes.
 

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Carpet tacks? Are those even a thing anymore?
Sure people still use them. But that was the reason for the non-conductive shank.

BTW, years ago the steel tip on my boots kept me from loosing my toes to an aircraft hanger door aboard ship. Lost the tip of the boot, but kept my toes.
 

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EH is a thin sheet of plastic in the midsole. It’s not tested and has no safety rating other than the off chance that you might touch something and it may or may not work. Real insulated boots are rubber dielectric boots that have to be tested just like gloves. Plus the electrical shock safety standard speaks to “floating objects”. If your boots are insulated and you are around significant voltage fields, you will be at a different potential and can get shocked touching anything grounded. For something that has questionable safety in the first place.

Because of the steel toe thing many plants make you wear boots with no holes over the toe area.
 
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