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In series with the existing nc stop push button.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
What if I wanted to add a light to be on only when the motor runs, and off in the event that the overloads were to trip, as well as a second light to be on when the motor is off?
 

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That's typically done with aux contacts snapped on the sides of the coil or with extra contacts sometimes featured on certain overload units.
 

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I'm just on my phone. Someone else will need to jump in
 

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None of the drawings tell you if the overloads are tripped. Many overloads have a NO contact that closes when they trip that you can use to indicate a tripped overload. If you don't have that you can make something with a relay and an additional NC contact on the starter.

One side of the relay coil would be connected to the left side of the starter coil, the other side of the relay coil would be connected to the neutral. You would use a NO open contact on the relay to "seal-in" the relay. This contact would get its power from the wire between the start and stop buttons and connect to the relay coil. This will keep the relay pulled in when the starter coil drops out because the overload has tripped.

Power would be taken through NO contact on the relay and through a NC contact on the starter and then to the light. This light would only be on if the starter was being told to be on and the overload was tripped.
 

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Put your green light in parallel around your M coil, just like you did the "holding" or "latching" cantact around your start button.

Your red light is fine.

In other words, the green light is wired between A1 and A2. Save you a set of contacts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
If I wanted to change this to having no voltage protection, aka if there's loss of utility supply the motor would return to whatever state it was in once it is re-energized, would it be as simple as replacing the pushbuttons with switches?
 

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If I wanted to change this to having no voltage protection, aka if there's loss of utility supply the motor would return to whatever state it was in once it is re-energized, would it be as simple as replacing the pushbuttons with switches?
Yes you would use a two wire control vs a three wire. A manual motor starter would serve that purpose.

ETA: the two wire control could be anything though, a float switch, pressure switch, limit switch, etc.
 
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