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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm working homework for apprentice school. The question (statement) is:

Name all appliances required to be on a separate circuit.

This is a residential wiring class. On a job that I was on, we ran dedicated circuits for everything except the dishwasher and garbage disposal, which were together. I am reading Article 422, but it doesn't list appliances specifically. Can someone give me a code reference that lists which appliances require a separate circuit? Thanks.
 

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I'm working homework for apprentice school. The question (statement) is:

Name all appliances required to be on a separate circuit.

This is a residential wiring class. On a job that I was on, we ran dedicated circuits for everything except the dishwasher and garbage disposal, which were together. I am reading Article 422, but it doesn't list appliances specifically. Can someone give me a code reference that lists which appliances require a separate circuit? Thanks.
Look at 210.23
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
So basically, there isn't a list. I need to sift through all of these requirements. In school, we were told to run dedicated circuits for everything in a kitchen. The gave us this handout for doing a kitchen upgrade.

 

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So basically, there isn't a list. I need to sift through all of these requirements. In school, we were told to run dedicated circuits for everything in a kitchen. The gave us this handout for doing a kitchen upgrade.

View attachment 31597
Do you have a screen shot of the question?
 

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I would say range(exception for a separate cook top), dryer, water heater and central heating equipment. Now that I've made a list, the experts will come out and tell me how I'm wrong and what it should be
 

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I would say range(exception for a separate cook top), dryer, water heater and central heating equipment. Now that I've made a list, the experts will come out and tell me how I'm wrong and what it should be

His list above looks good,just ad AC units.


I hope you post the answer they expect , so we can tell them they're wrong..:laughing:
 

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I'm working homework for apprentice school. The question (statement) is:

Name all appliances required to be on a separate circuit.

This is a residential wiring class. On a job that I was on, we ran dedicated circuits for everything except the dishwasher and garbage disposal, which were together. I am reading Article 422, but it doesn't list appliances specifically. Can someone give me a code reference that lists which appliances require a separate circuit? Thanks.

Your answer is in pursuing the size of each individual appliance, and then doing the 'fixed appliance' math Owl

from the hip (yes i'm lazy) a fixed appliance is required to have a branch circuit capable of providing not less than 50% of it's nameplate rating


i'm sure someone less lazy will ref 'fixed appliance' , but to be honest we rarely get the appliance lowdown @ rough, so we simply figure circuit dedication , as most manufactuers don't wish to blow the 20A norm



~CS~
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Celtic said:
I know that...you know that..many of us know that....

BUT...

I wanted to see it the OP knew that.
Here, we use #12 for the kitchen countertop receptacles. Is #12 required for kitchen receps that aren't countertop. Those can be 15A, correct?
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
chicken steve said:
Your answer is in pursuing the size of each individual appliance, and then doing the 'fixed appliance' math Owl

from the hip (yes i'm lazy) a fixed appliance is required to have a branch circuit capable of providing not less than 50% of it's nameplate rating

i'm sure someone less lazy will ref 'fixed appliance' , but to be honest we rarely get the appliance lowdown @ rough, so we simply figure circuit dedication , as most manufactuers don't wish to blow the 20A norm

~CS~
Re: not knowing appliance specs in advance

Jobs I have been on put the refrigerator on a 20A line. How common is it to put them on a 15 A line [210.52(B)(1) exception 2]? I see refrigerators = 725 W at most, so I have no idea why they would go on a 20A circuit.
 

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Re: not knowing appliance specs in advance

Jobs I have been on put the refrigerator on a 20A line. How common is it to put them on a 15 A line [210.52(B)(1) exception 2]? I see refrigerators = 725 W at most, so I have no idea why they would go on a 20A circuit.
A few years ago....a debate raged and flamed on about refrigerators and 15 or 20 OCPDs.

I personally looked at every residential unit Sub Zero had on their website...non called for anything more than a 15A CB.

Things may have changed in the refrigerator department from then until now.....but I doubt it changed the electrical requirements.
 
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