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Been a while since I was an apprentice, I loved questions like this. Simple question, and few of us JM ever give it a second thought. Just for apprentices please, but if someone you work with has an answer that's fine too.

A kitchen split receptacle fed by 3 conductor # 14 AWG cable is connected to a 15 amp DP breaker. Let's not quivel on a breaker smaller ok. In other words, 240 V, or 208 V, from hot to hot. In other words, fed from two different legs!

Question is Why? ;) Why can't you feed it from two breakers on the same leg, with a tie handle. Hope I am posing this properly. Space saver modules for example.

Have fun.

Thanks, Borgi
 

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14-302 Construction of circuit breakers (see Appendix B) Where circuit breakers are provided for the protection of apparatus or ungrounded conductors, or both, they shall open the circuit in all ungrounded conductors by the manual operation of a single handle and by the action of overcurrent, except (a) where single-pole circuit breakers are permitted by Rule 14-010(b); or (b) in branch circuits derived from a 3-wire grounded neutral system, two single-pole manually operable circuit breakers shall be permitted to be used instead of a 2-pole circuit breaker, provided that (i) their handles are interlocked with a device as provided by the manufacturer so that all ungrounded conductors will be opened by the manual operation of any handle; and (ii) each circuit breaker has voltage ratings not less than that of the multi-wire branch circuit.

The voltage ratings referred to in Item (b) covering single-pole circuit breakers suitable for use with handle ties appear on each breaker, e.g., 120/240 V.

So if you had a quad breaker you could use it on a MWBC
 
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