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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Doing some general wiring in a residential setting.
Now when entering a device box, or octagon box should there be any excess wire left in a loop before coming into the box, or should the wire be ran to the length necessary.

There is no code rule that I could find for this, other than pot lights.

I've been told by others that you should use extra, and I've also heard that you shouldn't. Which is correct? Or is it just a matter of personal taste?

I can see the point they are trying to make by leaving extra, though if done correctly you shouldn't need any extra.

Thanks
 

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About RXDT690
What is your electrical related field/trade:
Student
Location
Canada

What kind of 'student' are you? An apprentice?

And what Province?
 

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RXDT690 said:
Doing some general wiring in a residential setting. Now when entering a device box, or octagon box should there be any excess wire left in a loop before coming into the box, or should the wire be ran to the length necessary. There is no code rule that I could find for this, other than pot lights. I've been told by others that you should use extra, and I've also heard that you shouldn't. Which is correct? Or is it just a matter of personal taste? I can see the point they are trying to make by leaving extra, though if done correctly you shouldn't need any extra. Thanks
I've heard it both ways, but a little loop sure don't hurt when someone decided to move something alittle.
I never have left much extra, but that's how I was taught.
Worked on loan to another company who wanted loops once and it was darn hard to get in the habit.
A loop makes it easier to strip outside of the box before tiring in.
I didn't learn that way when I started so I still strip it after it's in the box.
 

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12-510
(4) Notwithstanding Item (1)(a), where cable is run to a switch or a receptacle specifically approved with an integral enclosure incorporating an integral cable clamp, the cable shall be supported by straps or other devices located within 300 mm from the switch or receptacle wall opening and there shall be at least a 300 mm loop of unbroken cable or 150 mm of a cable end available on the interior side of the finished wall to permit replacement.
 

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12-510
(4) Notwithstanding Item (1)(a), where cable is run to a switch or a receptacle specifically approved with an integral enclosure incorporating an integral cable clamp, the cable shall be supported by straps or other devices located within 300 mm from the switch or receptacle wall opening and there shall be at least a 300 mm loop of unbroken cable or 150 mm of a cable end available on the interior side of the finished wall to permit replacement.
Pretty much sums it up:thumbsup:
 

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Egads, I like tight. Never moved a box. Done millions. Some have posted a rule? I've totally ignored that. Inspectors have never called it.

I didn't learn that way when I started so I still strip it after it's in the box.
^^ :eek::eek:
 

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Egads, I like tight. Never moved a box. Done millions. Some have posted a rule? I've totally ignored that. Inspectors have never called it.



^^
I believe the rational behind this has more to do with drywallers and their :censored::censored::censored: routers. With a foot of extra cable outside the 2104, you can pull the slack in and voila, no damaged conductors.
Either that, or train drywallers to be careful:eek::eek:
Easier to leave slack
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
12-510
(4) Notwithstanding Item (1)(a), where cable is run to a switch or a receptacle specifically approved with an integral enclosure incorporating an integral cable clamp, the cable shall be supported by straps or other devices located within 300 mm from the switch or receptacle wall opening and there shall be at least a 300 mm loop of unbroken cable or 150 mm of a cable end available on the interior side of the finished wall to permit replacement.

This only talks about the interior side not what is left in the wall.



I understand the supporting within 300mm of the box, or using the holes in the studs as support. Though with doing a rough in leaving 300mm of cable coming out of your box is too much.

This code rule is talking about how much to leave coming out of the box, correct me if I'm wrong. I'm wanting to know if there is a rule for leaving the loop seen in the picture above, as opposed to leaving no loop and just running the wire directly in.
 

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12-510
(4) Notwithstanding Item (1)(a), where cable is run to a switch or a receptacle specifically approved with an integral enclosure incorporating an integral cable clamp, the cable shall be supported by straps or other devices located within 300 mm from the switch or receptacle wall opening and there shall be at least a 300 mm loop of unbroken cable or 150 mm of a cable end available on the interior side of the finished wall to permit replacement.
Is this a new code rule, I don't remember ever hearing about this rule in school. The last job I was on using NMD90 was 6 yrs ago.
 

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Is this a new code rule, I don't remember ever hearing about this rule in school. The last job I was on using NMD90 was 6 yrs ago.
I don't use NMD either, but at one of the MB Hydro, code seminars they mentioned the loop. At least that is how I interpreted it.
We need a loomex king to verify this.
 

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12-510
(4) Notwithstanding Item (1)(a), where cable is run to a switch or a receptacle specifically approved with an integral enclosure incorporating an integral cable clamp, the cable shall be supported by straps or other devices located within 300 mm from the switch or receptacle wall opening and there shall be at least a 300 mm loop of unbroken cable or 150 mm of a cable end available on the interior side of the finished wall to permit replacement.
Is that not talking about those self contained units (don't remember what they're called) used in mobile homes, etc., so there's slack to work on the device.... not the standard device box with separate device?
 

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In my terribly small amount of experience, its a crapshoot. Some inspectors want lots and some want virtually none. Doing a 4-storey, 110-unit wood frame condo right now, and there seems to be no rhyme or reason to proper loop length.
 

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Doing some general wiring in a residential setting.
Now when entering a device box, or octagon box should there be any excess wire left in a loop before coming into the box, or should the wire be ran to the length necessary.

There is no code rule that I could find for this, other than pot lights.

I've been told by others that you should use extra, and I've also heard that you shouldn't. Which is correct? Or is it just a matter of personal taste?

I can see the point they are trying to make by leaving extra, though if done correctly you shouldn't need any extra.

Thanks
In Ontario rule 12-510 (4) says you must leave extra wire it is a new rule that came out in the last code book. I always left extra wire at the boxes in case the drywall people got carried away with their roto zip and chew up the wires,I have seen it happen many times.
 

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12-510(4) pertains to switches/receptacles not mounted in a box Rules 12-510(4), 12-3000(8), 12-3010(7)
Rules 12-510(4), 12-3000(8), and 12-3010(7) are intended to permit the use of a self-contained device in lieu of a device box. A self-contained device is a wiring device with an integral enclosure having brackets that securely fasten the device to walls or ceilings of conventional frame construction, for use with nonmetallic-sheathed cable. Self-contained devices used in dry locations are certified to CSA C22.2 No. 111 for switches and CSA C22.2 No. 42 for receptacles and are primarily used in mobile homes, recreational vehicles, manufactured buildings, and on-site frame construction.
 

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