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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a warm tiles RK- 2 240 volt relay that I am working with. I am controlling 2 loops off of the same tstat. When the tstat calls for heat the relay doesn't close. I have 240 volts on the primary of the relay but nothing on any other terminals. Bad relay?
 

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Donuts > Fried Eggs
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Assuming you checked all the simple stuff like correct voltage, correct terminals?

Then yes, if you put voltage to the relay coil and it doesn't change state, bad relay. A sure-fire confirmation is if you've got no continuity on the relay coil.
 

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Here is some info about the relay


http://www.ezfloorheat.com/images/RK-00142-002.pdf

They call it an 'electronic relay' which suggests to me it is a solid state relay.



OPERATION:
When you are ready to energize your system, consult the
operating instructions associated with the specific heating
controller, such as those provided with Easy Heat’s Warm Tiles
FTS and ET series thermostats. If you have any questions please
contact Easy Heat at 1-800-537-4732
 

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I have a warm tiles RK- 2 240 volt relay that I am working with. I am controlling 2 loops off of the same tstat. When the tstat calls for heat the relay doesn't close. I have 240 volts on the primary of the relay but nothing on any other terminals. Bad relay?

Edit..BBQs link shows that it doesn't wire the way I thought.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Here is some info about the relay

http://www.ezfloorheat.com/images/RK-00142-002.pdf

They call it an 'electronic relay' which suggests to me it is a solid state relay.
I called that number and they are closed today. In reading the paper work it says that the relay will allow you to control loads higher than the rating of the tstat. How does this work? The relay and tstat are both 240 volts. When the relay closes the tstat will have the same load as if the loads were tied in directly to the tstat correct?
 

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I called that number and they are closed today. In reading the paper work it says that the relay will allow you to control loads higher than the rating of the tstat. How does this work? The relay and tstat are both 240 volts. When the relay closes the tstat will have the same load as if the loads were tied in directly to the tstat correct?
No, the heating load will be carried across the relay contacts, not through the tstat, which as you read will not carry as high a load as the relay. Think of the relay as a remote-control switch. The tstat closes and opens the switch as heat is called for and reached. When the relay is used the tstat current should be very small, just above the minimum the tstat will work with (some electronic line-voltage tstats have a minimum current that they can operate with, as well as a max).
 

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How does this work? The relay and tstat are both 240 volts. When the relay closes the tstat will have the same load as if the loads were tied in directly to the tstat correct?

Not if you wired it per the link.

Is that how you wired it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Not if you wired it per the link.

Is that how you wired it?
I realized I didnt wire it according the accompanied diagram. But im still confused by the whole thing. I ran a 30 amp 240 volt line to the tstat. From the load side of the tstat I went to 0 1 of the relay. My two loops of heat I brought to 2 and 6. I now realize I need a separate feed to the relay. But if I have only two hot legs in the service..... you hear what I'm saying? I think I kinda just talked myself through it haha. Its the same 240 volt circuit but the load doesn't pass through the relay. Am I getting somewhere now? I knew these lunch beers and electricaltalk.com would help me
 

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finster said:
I realized I didnt wire it according the accompanied diagram. But im still confused by the whole thing. I ran a 30 amp 240 volt line to the tstat. From the load side of the tstat I went to 0 1 of the relay. My two loops of heat I brought to 2 and 6. I now realize I need a separate feed to the relay. But if I have only two hot legs in the service..... you hear what I'm saying? I think I kinda just talked myself through it haha. Its the same 240 volt circuit but the load doesn't pass through the relay. Am I getting somewhere now? I knew these lunch beers and electricaltalk.com would help me
Bring the 240 volt to 8&4.
 

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Electric Al
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Between 2 and 4 is a normally open contact .

Between 6 and 8 is a normally open contact .

When T stat calls , the relay closes these contacts .

Diagram looks O K to me .
 

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As others have said you need to run 240V feed to terminals 8&4. Theres no electrical connection between your relay coil (0&1) and your contacts (2&4) and (6&8) thats what makes it a relay. This relay is really nothing more than a fancy 2 pole switch the only difference being you turn it on with electricity instead of your finger.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks for all of your help guys I had a basic understanding of relays before today. I wire a lot of boilers and HVAC systems with multiple zones requiring relay boards. I guess the line voltage confused me a little bit. But this leads me to another question. The radiant heating is in a bathroom which means I need it to be GFCI protected. The thermostat comes with a GFI built in but the thermostat is only controlling the coil which means it won't pass that protection on to the load side of the relay am I correct?
 

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Electric Al
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Thanks for all of your help guys I had a basic understanding of relays before today. I wire a lot of boilers and HVAC systems with multiple zones requiring relay boards. I guess the line voltage confused me a little bit. But this leads me to another question. The radiant heating is in a bathroom which means I need it to be GFCI protected. The thermostat comes with a GFI built in but the thermostat is only controlling the coil which means it won't pass that protection on to the load side of the relay am I correct?


Can you not use the same G F I protected power source ?
 

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Thanks for all of your help guys I had a basic understanding of relays before today. I wire a lot of boilers and HVAC systems with multiple zones requiring relay boards. I guess the line voltage confused me a little bit. But this leads me to another question. The radiant heating is in a bathroom which means I need it to be GFCI protected. The thermostat comes with a GFI built in but the thermostat is only controlling the coil which means it won't pass that protection on to the load side of the relay am I correct?
How big is this bathroom? At 240, you can could heat 300 sq ft very easily:eek:
You can feed 2 loops with one circuit and thermostat.
 
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